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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (July-Dec. 1911)"

SDD7 1SD2E3T 7 

California State Library 



Accession No. 



Call No. 



Ci /> 



JjrIISB, 



3604S S-66 SM 5PO 



I 



BOOST FOR GOOD ROADS 




Established July 20. 1856 



apO FlgAKI©Q@(B 







AN FRANCISCO, CAL, JULY 8, 1911 



I£ Marquise 

Turkish Cigarettes 




"OF A VINTAGE" 



10 FOR 25 CENTS 



35 Years 
Will Be Saved 



Transcontinental Travelers 
in the Next Twelve Months 



BY THE 



SAN FRANCISCO 

"OVERLAND 
LIMITED" 

(The train of superb service) 



LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO 10:20 A. M. 
ARRIVE CHICAGO 9:10 A. M. 

In time to connect with morn- 
ing trains for Eastern Cities. 



This reduction of time is made possible by the expendi- 
ture of TWO HUNDRED MILLION DOLLARS in 
improving road bed, installing electric block signal pro- 
tection, double tracks, in betterment of power and 
equipment, etc. 



SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC 



TICKET OFFICES 

Flood Building Palace Hotel 

Market Street Ferry Depot 

TELEPHONE KEARNY 3160 

Broadway & 13th St. Oakland 



TFrHATT TAVERN 

X ■ ' V»X J.XJL \J COR. EDDY and POWELL S" 



STS.. S. F. 
Phones: Douglas 470 0: C3417 



A New Departure 

The management is pleased to announce to the patrons 
of Techau Tavern, that hereafter, in addition to our vocal 
and instrumental concerts during luncheon, shopping 
hours, and dinner, there will be a continuous vocal 
entertainment between the hours of 8:30 p. m. and 12:30 



The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 Home C 6705 



BLANCO'S OFarr i t^ Larkin 



Phone Franklin 9 



No visitor should leave the city without seeine the finest cafe 
in America. Visit our new annex 



TREAT YOUR FAMILY TO A SUNDAY 
DINNER AT 

JULES Under MONADNOCK BUILDING 
SPECIAL MUSIC GRILL FOR LADIES 



St. Germain Restaurant 

60-64 Ellis St., San Francisco 

Capacity 600 Seats 
OUR SERVICE AND PRICES WILL PLEASE YOU 



GRAND RESIDENCE SITE 



Unobstructed 
Marine View 



Lot 45x120 to Rear Street on Sunny Side of 
Russian Hill's Finest Block 



FOR SALE — Account of Non-resident Owner, by 
John McGaw & Co., 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 

232 Montgomery Street Mills Building 



00 



u. 




!< % >7 ,?s 




bUHUM July to, VtM 




Devoted to the Leading Interest! of California and the Pacific Coaet. 




VOL. LXXXII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 8, 1911 



Ni. 1 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LT5TTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 

London Office — 30 Cornhili, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements, or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LF.TTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



Everything is lovely and the airship honks high. 

Yesterday's thriller is to-day's commonplace. The bird- 
men are now flying across the British Channel in flocks. 

In New York they are to put up a hotel twenty-four 

stories high. Incidentally they will put up prices to match. 

Listen to the sorrows of a poor old man while Nat Good- 
win relates how it seems to be married to a few stage beauties. 

Hiram I's board of control is drifting out into deep 

water, and there is no life preserver handy. Caveat emperor. 

Put the exposition in the best place, and then, when the 

time rolls around, put Rolph where he will do the city the most 
good. 

There seems to be lots of feeling about this exposition 

site question — vacant lots with nothing growing on them but 
options. 

Only thirteen killed in the nation's celebration of its 

135th birthday. And the firemen did not play the hose, but 
played cards. 

Seattle has burned the local hammer, but what good will 

that do? You don't knock your enemies any more; you get 
them indicted. 

The way some people go on about the little quiver of last 

week, you'd think they did not know by personal experience 
how to spell temblor. 

Motormen on San Francisco street cars want to sit down. 

So, it may be remarked, do those passengers who belong to the 
strap-hanging brigade. 

The Fourth of July feature at San Quentin was the pro- 
duction of a farce by Abe Ruef. One may guess that it dealt 
with municipal government. 

It would not be proper for a polite journal to name the 

only kind of shop that is "open" in San Francisco under the 
beneficent rule of McCarthy. 

"Near beer" is no longer to be sold in North Carolina. 

It produced a near drunkenness that seemed to all the senses 
no different from the real article. 

The new Chief of Police for whom John Seymour was 

driven out of office appears to be of just the color he is painted 
— and that is not the color of his name. 

Just as soon as an aviator with a Teutonic name gets 

into the cross-channel flying game, watch for a recrudescence 
of the German war scare in Great Britain. 



The crackerless Fourth is responsible for the patientless 

hospital and for the ringless fire alarm. 

Katherine Elkins, says rumor No. 9001, is going to marry 

"Billy" Hitt of Washington. After that we may expect to see 
Hitt hit the first reporter that comes his way. 

At twenty-nine a Colorado woman is a grandmother by 

the birth of a child to her fifteen year old daughter. 'Tis a fine 
combination of precocity and fecundity in that family. 

An Italian writer, discussing male dress, advises men to 

discard their trousers. The way this suffrage business is siz- 
zling, it's a one-guess matter who will get the bifurcated gar- 
ments. 

San Francisco earnestly requests the Dutch professor 

who is over here studying Indian dances to come on West, and 
look into the "Grizzly Bear" and kindred terpsichorean nov- 
elties. 

Saturday, July 1st, the city was shaken up. On that 

same date, it being pay day, the city employees were shaken 
down by the administration which needs coin for political pur- 
poses. 

A high-church rector in Massachusetts has it all figured 

out that King George is of Hebrew descent. Here's one cleric 
who won't be bidden to put his legs under the royal mahogany 
at Windsor. 

Did any of you notice Mayor McCarthy stopping the 

prize-fight on July 4th in San Francisco ? And do you remem- 
ber why there wasn't a similar affair in this city on the same 
day of 1910! 

Why shouldn't Rowell have taken money for his Ber- 
keley high school speech? Was it not said by that Great One 
whose prophet Rowell is, that a man must eat ? And is not an 
editor a man? 

Dance till any old hour in any new way without fear of 

the police. The lid was wrenched off and converted into a 
chafing dish wherein Mayor McCarthy may cook up another 
term in office for himself. 

Singer Emma Eames is soon to marry singer Gorgoza, 

for whose freedom she is said to have paid $100,000. It's a lot 
of money for a husband in a world so full of men, but maybe 
he is as good as he sounds. 

The Oakland man who left $3,000 worth of real estate 

to the Industrial Workers of the World may have meant noth- 
ing of the kind, but he dealt that order a cruel blow. Forty 
acres and a mule will cure the rankest socialist of his economic 
disease. 

What has become of all the "highbrows" of Carmel? 

The annual play of that town of genius was chiefly done by the 
butcher, the baker and the druggist of the village who make no 
pretensions to genius in writing books and getting them pub- 
lished for nothing. 



E ID) H T ® IR H A L 



COMMENT 



A Reasonable 
Water Proposition 



Distinguished and invaluable ser- 
vice is rendered to the Spring Val- 
ley Water Company by an adminis- 
tration which favors the Hetch- 
Hetchy project just far enough to keep any other Sierra water 
proposition from getting before the people. The enthusiasts 
who cling blindly to the Hetch-Hetchy idea — some of them 
honestly enough, although ignorantly — are helping along the 
water monopoly's game in the same way. These will ask noth- 
ing and get nothing for their endeavors. Nobody will hand them 
any bills, marked or unmarked; nobody invites them to secret 
conferences in the private rooms of French restaurants. They 
are merely foolish people, easily deceived and ardently striving 
to make co.iverts to their own folly. 

Note that there is an outcry from the unrewarded Hetch- 
Hetchy enthusiasts against the inquiry now being conducted 
by the Government into the Sierra water question. Notice, 
also, that Spring Valley makes no objections at all. The Hetch- 
Hetchyites declare it to be a question for San Francisco and 
not the Government to settle. They forget that the essence of 
the plea which got us a temporary and revocable permit to use 
the Tuolumne source was that without it San Francisco could 
not grow — that there was no other available Sierra source, and 
that we had outgrown already the capacity of Spring Valley. 
The Army Board of Engineers is on the ground making a first- 
hand inquiry into the validity of this plea. The engineers have 
been over the ground, and now they are taking testimony from 
the various parties interested and concerned. Opposition to 
any such examination tends strongly to excite suspicion as to 
the motives of the objectors. They must have something to 
hide. 

Spring Valley does not mind. It feels safe, no matter what 
the engineers may recommend. If the report is against the 
Hetch-Hetchy, they can look to the Hetch-Hetchyites to march 
on Washington like an army with banners. Thus the whole 
Sierra matter will be indefinitely hung up. Meanwhile, stimu- 
lated by the necessities of the Exposition, and by the normal 
increase of population, the demand for more water will turn 
the city in disgust and despair into the hands of Spring Val- 
ley. Either the public must buy that concern, lock, stock and 
barrel at its own inordinate figures, or must give it such assur- 
ance of better rates as will "justify" it in making large ex- 
penditures for development of its sources. In short, San Fran- 
cisco is caught and crucified between the Spring Valley on one 
side and the dubious, costly, far-off Hetch-Hetchy on the other. 
If the engineers are uninfluenced and unbiased, if they know 
their business and do their duty, it is the belief of the News 
Letter that they will report adversely on the Hetch-Hetchy 
proposition — will hold it to be not necessary to the growth of 
San Francisco and wholly inadvisable as a Government gift be- 
cause it would prove a ruinously costly municipal luxury. If 
these engineers have made their examination with an eye sin- 
gle to the facts, and will report the absolute truth, then they 
will make it clear that the largest, nearest, cheapest and best 
Sierra source is that offered by the Sierra Blue Lakes Water 
and Power Company. 

If they have not already learned for themselves, they may 
quickly and easily find out that the Blue Lakes project involves 
no controversy over titles; that it is nearly fifty miles closer 
to the point of consumption than Hetch-Hetchy ; that it can be 
made available in three years instead of ten years for Hetch- 
Hetchy; that its cost will be $30,000,000 less than Hetch- 
Hetchy; that it will send in its water through pipes all the way, 
and not subject to the contamination of the open ditch plan 
necessary to get Hetch-Hetchy water here at the present esti- 
mate of cost; that it is the only all-gravity source offered; that 



it will incidentally and with trifling comparative expense de- 
liver to the city 50,000 horse-power, which can be sold at nomi- 
nal cost and yet return a substantial profit ; that the Sierra Blue 
Lakes proposition will make it possible for the city to have 
200,000 gallons a day of the purest water in the world, plus 
50,000 horsepower, on such terms that, at a minimum rate for 
the water and power the Spring Valley city distributing system 
may be acquired, and that the interest and sinking fund of the 
bonds will be completely covered by the city's income from the 
plant. 

But it is not likely that such a report will be made. The in- 
fluences at work are not all on the surface. They have thus far 
kept San Francisco from doing anything but waste time and 
money on Hetch-Hetchy, and yet have permitted that project 
to retain enough life to suit the purposes of the water monop- 
oly. They will not kill Hetch-Hetchy, although they have the 
power to do so when they please. It is a most useful factor in 
the situation. 

Doubtless the people will some day see these things clearly, 
but it is likely to be too late. If the taxpayer and the water 
rate payer could be induced to judge the proposition on its 
merits, and if an administration could be installed that would 
deal with the matter openly and energetically, then before the 
Exposition opens we should have settled the ancient water 
question by acceptance of the Sierra Blue Lakes plan. By that 
time we should be as rich in water as we are now poor and 
cramped. Every householder in the city would be enjoying a 
practically unlimited supply of water straight from the snow- 
fed sources of high, cold Sierra, at merely nominal cost. We 
should be as regards water the most fortunate and most inviting 
city in the world. With respect to power, we should hold out 
to the manufacturer inducements that no other city could ap- 
proach. 

The Supervisors seem to be in a great hurry, for some reason 
or other, to acquire the Hall properties. Ham Hall and asso- 
ciates can give no guarantee with their deeds, and with only 
$100,000 in the treasury to purchase $625,000 worth of prop- 
erty, seems to be an anxious and undue course to follow. It is 
to be hoped that the army engineers will not be influenced by 
this particular move. 

»• 
A few of the counties of California 
have, and others are preparing, to 
make a demand on the State Gov- 
ernment for their share of the $18,- 
000,000 good roads fund so that they may commence providing 
themselves with modernized highways. This is unfair to the 
State as a whole. Cutting up of the fund by piecemeal or for 
division among the counties was not contemplated when the 
call was made to the people to ratify the proposition to bond 
the State to construct a State-wide system of public roads. If 
the Legislature had contemplated apportioning the appropria- 
tion according to location and population of the several coun- 
ties, it would have said so; moreover, the people supposed that 
the appropriation was for general and not purely local good 
roads building: otherwise it is safe to say that the propo- 
sition would have been rejected. Whatever may have been in 
the minds of the advocates, the mind of the public was clear 
that the oniy way to supply California with a system of good 
highways was to construct at least two trunk roads between the 
northern and southern boundaries of the State, one running 
through the great valleys and one following the coast line, 
having them both for base lines, and at various points the ter- 
mini of the lateral or county roads. 

It was some such plan that was advocated before the people 
to win their favorable consideration of the proposed bond issue, 



Raiding the 
Good Roads Fund 



July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



and it may be said that the proposition was ratified by the 
voters because of that understanding of the proposed good 
roads programme. But nothing would more surely and certainly 
defeat the leading purpose of the good roads scheme than dos- 
ing out given sums from the appropriation to counties for local 
expenditure. Certainly such distribution of the general fund 
would greatly expedite the work in some counties, but so far 
as the whole State is concerned, there would be patches of 
good roads connected by unimproved highways — a system of 
patch-work and wholly inefficient for the purpose originally 
contemplated. Such a system for State-wide good roads, with 
a cluster of good highways here and there, would make Cali- 
fornia resemble a wide expanse of region with oases scattered 
about to designate the desirable places for comfort and profit. 
New York and the New England States began the construction 
of good highways by first designating lines for trunk roads with 
commercial centers for initial and objective points, then fol- 
lowed a system of lateral or county roads which finally cul- 
minated in an elaborate system of highways between the rural 
districts and the towns and cities and industrial centers through- 
out each commonwealth, but they were constructed under the 
supervision of State engineers. Should the fund set apart by 
California be divided between the counties for them to do their 
own road building in their own way, and to and from points of 
their own selection, the $18,000,000 would soon be frittered 
away, with nothing left but a lot of poorly-constructed and un- 
connected public highways to show for it. 

3»" 
It is well enough for the good peo- 
Boost for Good Roads, pie of San Mateo County to urge 
their claim to a share in the $18,- 
000,000 State Road Fund. In truth, they should be strongly 
supported in that by San Francisco and Santa Clara Counties. 
It will be a poor system of State highways that does not give a 
direct all-land route to the metropolis. Under any such system 
there must be a road running from San Jose to San Francisco, 
else it will fail of its purpose. 

But San Mateo cannot afford — nor can San Francisco — to 
wait for the State highway plan to be worked out into a high- 
way down the peninsula. This, as is already clear, is not a 
constructive administration, but rather a destructive. It is 
more occupied in tearing down than in building up — too busy 
doing politics to do business. There is little prospect of any 
actual State road making that will help San Mateo and San 
Francisco within the next two or three years. These two coun- 
ties are almost cut off from each other by the present wretched 
road that serves as their only means of individual communica- 
tion. They will lose much if they let this condition continue 
until the State cures it. 

Both the peninsula counties should take a lesson from Sacra- 
mento and San Joaquin Counties which have not waited for the 
State highway dream to come true. They have expended mil- 
lions in the last two years on roads, and have done it wisely and 
effectively. Around both Sacramento and Stockton there are 
some of the finest boulevards in the State, and between the two 
cities is nearly fifty miles of road that make the motorist, the 
driver of any horse-drawn vehicle, the 'cyclist and the pedes- 
trian wonder if he is really on earth or in a kind of paradise. 
Judicious use of oil in these counties, properly spread upon a 
surface inexpensively graded and treated, has produced a road 
that holds up magnificently under all kinds of traffic. It is 
dustless and smooth, yet not slippery. It is elastic and yet does 
not wear into ruts or tTacks. where it is given any reasonable 
attention. 

San Mateo should certainly keep on moving for its share of 
the State fund, but meanwhile it should, co-operating with San 
Francisco, make itself a highway that will answer for the inter- 



val, and afterwards can be put to good use as a secondary route, 
or can be figured into the larger improvement. There is just 
one way to do things like this, and that way is by means of a 
county issue of bonds. By that process there will be no diver- 
sion of the present road appropriations from needed works of 
construction and repair, and in that way, also, posterity will be 
made to bear its just share of the burden. Let San Mateo be- 
gin at once the campaign of education that is an essential pre- 
liminary to any bonding proposition. 

JT 
For about two years the Govern- 
The Folly of it All. ment has kept its law department 
very busy curbing "the interests," 
and during that time it has paid $1,000,000 for the service of 
special counsel to assist the Attorney-General and about thirty 
district and circuit court attorneys in prosecuting the several 
alleged law-breakers. But the special counsel fees are not all 
the Government has paid out in vindication of its own integrity. 
The Supreme Court, its machinery and the machinery of more 
than two dozen district and circuit courts and commissioners 
has cost a deal more than $1,000,000. However, at least two 
results have been secured. For the most part the so-called 
trusts appear to be unharmed, and the courts themselves hav« 
shown that practically all the anti-trust legislation is not work- 
able. In fact, it has broken down under the weight of its own 
uncertainty. Suits were originally brought against the com- 
bines because they were conducted in a way that restrained the 
free course of merchandise distribution between the States, be- 
sides destroying competition with the greedy and merciless 
hand of competition. Another consequence of this effort of the 
Government to protect the public by crushing the "combines" is 
that the people have been taxed $1,000,000 extra for special 
legal aid, and what is more to the point is that general business 
has been retarded and clothed in uncertainty. But it could not 
have been otherwise. 

It is no small matter when the entire legal machinery of the 
Government assumes that our greatest business enterprises are 
law-breakers, and then try to destroy them. Naturally, all 
business enterprises, great and small, would feel the jar and 
become timid, the more so because the highest court known to 
our system of Government has practically admitted that the 
letter of the anti-trust law was insufficient to cope with such 
aggregations of capita), but by interpreting the act in the light 
of its spirit the resources of the court were ample. The busi- 
ness interests of the United States were quick to interpret the 
spirit of the court's finding to mean that the court was guided 
in coming to its conclusion by what it conceived to be in the 
minds of the framers of the Sherman law, rather than in its 
letter, which the public is disposed to think fully expressed the 
purpose and range of authority of the enactment. The public 
is justified, therefore, in believing that the law under which 
the two greater trusts were tried is not only workable, but that 
it broke down under the strain of the decision. 

While anger, in the nature of hatred, malice, strife, envy, 

should be put away by all who are seeking to be copies of God's 
dear Son, anger in the sense of righteous indignation against 
wrong-doing, sin in its various forms, is proper; and although 
it should be used with great moderation, backed by love, there 
are circumstances in which it would be wrong not to have right- 
eous anger and use it. 

The intelligent janitor at the Hall of Justice is of an ob- 
serving turn of mind. The other day he was heard to remark: 
"Notwithstandin' de new chief of police, it looks like dat new 
s'nografuh, Miss Ann Ex, is gwine hab a hahd time to hoi' huh 
job." 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



The public is being treated these 
Scientific Management, days to wise dissertations on the 
brand new subject of "scientific 
management," of about every enterprise whose aim is to secure 
larger profits at the expense of some one. The air is burdened 
with the theme, especially in the industrial world, and in rail- 
way operation. Some very wise and learned men have volun- 
teered to enlighten the public by defining the meaning of 
"scientific management," and the kind of machinery that gives 
the best results. Especially are employers of skilled and un- 
skilled labor taking great interest in the new economic discov- 
ery. Significantly so, because at the last analysis of "scientific 
management" no place for a scientific or ethical uplift for the 
hewers of wood and drawers of water is to be found anywhere 
in its ramifications. Scientific management, according to its 
advocates, means a lower cost of materials and greater effi- 
ciency in the machinery of the management and its methods. 
The machinery of production always includes the operatives 
of the machinery. 

Scientific management, therefore, contemplates the utmost 
possible volume of production by the machinery and its opera- 
tives to the end that the cost of converting raw materials into 
finished product may be reduced, under scientific management, 
to the minimum. This means two things. First, greater output 
facilities on the part of the machinery and the cheapening of 
the cost of intelligent direction of the mechanical operation of 
the machine. Scientific management includes a reduction in 
the cost of maintaining a sufficient steam-power to drive the 
machine or machines, and if the cost of supplying the toilers 
with ample steam power to run the machines is scientific eco- 
nomics, is not the cost of the operatives of the machineiy to 
be considered scientifically? 

Scientific management stands for longer hours and lower 
wages for those who prepare raw materials for the machines to 
convert into finished products, and longer hours and lower 
wages for the operatives of the machines, but greater dividends 
for the stockholders in the scientifically managed corporation. 

W 
All great cities are faced by the 
perplexing problem of how to han- 
dle its traffic. Surface ways, ele- 
vated ways and sub-ways have been 
constructed to prevent congestion, but they all are artificial 
means of transportation, and in no large city in America or 
Europe do they Keep pace with the steadily increasing demand 
of the steadily increasing population and requirements of 
steadily expanding business enterprises for more and more 
rapid ways and means to meet the demands of the pedestrian 
and vehicle traffic. Hence it is that the traffic of a great city- 
continues to be the most perplexing problem that large munici- 
palities have to solve, and so long as cities keep on expanding 
in population and area, the solution of the problem is to be- 
come more difficult. 

San Francisco is approaching the problem in what might be 
called an aggravated form. If the world stands as it is until and 
during the year 1915, the present demand for facilities to ex- 
pedite the movement of the city's traffic — vehicle and pedes- 
trian—will be multiplied. As it is, fully 100,000 people have 
to have accommodations every day to reach their homes, which 
are located beyond the limits of the city proper, and the street 
cars they have to depend upon are hemmed about throughout 
the journey by countless vehicles, so that the streets of San 
Francisco are covered from sidewalk to sidewalk by what, at 
a distance, looks like a solid mass of moving life. But the 
same conditions obtain in all great cities. As for San Francisco 
this condition comes directly as a consequence of commercial, 
industrial and population increase, which come in advance ofc 



San Francisco's 
Traffic Problem 



increases in facilities for transportation and surface way for 
vehicles. That is the condition of San Francisco to-day. What 
will it be in 191S, when people from all nations throng the city 
and its suburbs? 

To be sure, the underground space is still unoccupied by 
transportation and traffic conveniences, so is the "air route" 
waiting to welcome elevated railway passenger service. From 
the view-point of San Francisco's unoccupied space that could 
be utilized for the accommodation of the city's traffic, the prob- 
lem of how to handle the crowds in 1915 conveniently and with 
despatch does not seem to be impossible of solution. But there 
is a growing need of subways and elevated ways independent 
of the additional requirements of 1915. 



The Los Angeles 
Dynamiting Case. 



The stage is being set at Los An- 
geles for the most dramatic court 
scenes the country has witnessed in 
the last half century. In a short 
time, all the pleas of evasion having been brushed away, the 
McNamaras will be brought to trial for the Times dynamiting 
of October last, and then will begin the unfolding of the most 
diabolical "physical force" system since the "Molly Maguires" 
were put out of the assassination and arson business. 

The prosecution appears to be proceeding with coolness and 
the utmost self-repression and restraint. Probably it is the de- 
sire and design of the Los Angeles authorities, co-operating 
with national interests, not only to bring home the Times out- 
rage to its actual perpetrators, but to make the exposure of the 
plan and its master minds so complete that it will be a long time 
before dynamite is again systematically used as a factor in in- 
dustrial controversy. 

Enough has been revealed of the dark and bloody background 
behind the Times horror to let the hand of organized labor be 
seen at work in ferocious and unexampled criminality. Quite 
apart from any written or oral testimony against the men in 
jail there are many evidences, physical and circumstantial, 
definitely to connect the organization of the iron-workers with 
a long series of crimes of which that at Los Angeles was the 
most terrible in results, the climax of ten years of savage, half- 
secret lawlessness. When the story is told bit by bit under 
oath and the trail is mapped out by fact and date and circum- 
stance, unionism will be hard put to it to escape the responsi- 
bility and the sure punishment of public sentiment. 

Weeks before the Los Angeles crime, the investigators of the 
dynamite outrages in widely separated cities had in their hands 
the evidence that made the tracing of the Times dynamiters 
comparatively simple. Long before that it had become evident 
that wherever there was conflict between open shop and closed 
shop affecting structural iron and steel workers, there might be 
expected murderous assaults and dynamiting. It had come to 
be understood, also, that the men and the means employed in 
these disputes were biddable for the desperate work of any 
other section of organized labor that would countenance such 
crimes as a part of their warfare. All this will be made plain 
through the trial at Los Angeles, and it will be shown how the 
dynamiters went to that city, not so much to take a cowardly 
hand in local controversy, touching the union that owns the 
McNamaras, as to murder Otis, the hated union-baiter, and to 
destroy his newspaper. Very probably it will be brought out 
who financed that transaction and carried on the negotiations. 

It is a losing cause that must resort to dynamite to maintain 
itself; it is a lost cause against which such crimes can be 
proved. The trial at Los Angeles will make a most significant 
chapter in the history of industrialism in America. 



ASTI SPECIAL, SEC, the Italian-Swiss Colony's popu- 
lar California champagne, is naturally fermented in the bottle 
and not carbonated, 



July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 








To Subscriber. — Laborers do not strike in hard times. 

The man who is without a job cannot strike. The man whose 
situation is precarious because of uncertainty as to how long 
the work will last is afraid to strike. Good times come. There 
is work for everybody and more than all can do. Workmen 
demand better pay, and generally get it. If they don't get it, 
they strike, and it comes promptly. Higher pay for the pro- 
ducer raises the cost of the product. The workman must pay 
more for all he buys. Everybody must do so, for everybody 
must get more for what he has to sell. Workmen must again 
get more for their labor. New strikes follow, wages advance. 
Things cost so much that people buy less. Building diminishes 
because prices of material and labor are too high. Diminished 
demand for material and manufactured product closes factories, 
and men are thrown out of employment. Hard times come 
again. You work out the solution: I'm busy. 

A city official who has once before contributed to these 

columns an expression of opinion regarding my personality and 
acquirements, concludes a lengthy screed with the remark, "So 
we trust our yeliow dog friend will not lie awake nights over 
any 'laugh' that may be given the writer." This finished sen- 
tence is perhaps as stirring, if not quite as grammatical, as any- 
thing he has written, and is quoted as exhibiting the writer's 
classical style and dignity of expression. His employment of 
the pronoun first person plural is justified by the usage of 
monarchs, princes, ecclesiastical dignitaries and editors, from 
which his position may be inferred to be so elevated as to make 
the cultivation of a gentlemanly demeanor quite unnecessary. 
I have read just sufficient of this man's correspondence to feel 
quite sure that no one, unaffected with a taste for coarseness, 
arrogance and brag, can possibly experience a disposition to be- 
come further acquainted with it. 

A poor little kiss, dead and buried months ago, has been 

resurrected and made the means of dividing in fiercest battle 
the erstwhile peaceful burg of Redwood City; the women, who 
take the matter seriously, on one side, and the men, who say it 
is "all rot," on the other. One of those innocent kissing games, 
so dear to our childhood, was the scene and instigating influence 
of the "assault;" a sweet young girl pupil the uncomplaining 
assaultee, and a bold, bad teacher the alleged assaulter. This 
teacher, other teachers, the principal and most of the pupils 
have, as a consequence, gone, and now the women's clubs are 
dragging the dilapidpted little corpse of this dead and gone 
crimelet through the streets of the village and demanding ven- 
geance and "protection." They declare that under present ex- 
isting conditions they are in momentary danger of being kissed 
themselves, and the brutes of men declare their fears to be 
ridiculous. Where is chivalry? 



-As examples of sticking their heads in the sand and 

praying for the good luck to have a decent municipal Govern- 
ment provided at the pains of other men's votes, San Francis- 
cans out-do any ostrich whose scaly leg ever encompassed an 
African desert. This human ostrich of society seems to come 
• out of his trance only when the iron is thrust into his vitals. 
He has long felt the thrust, and has been as long in waking up, 
but there are, at last, local indications that he is becoming res- 
tive. It is not yet too late to remind this bird that the day af- 
ter, of the drunkard, is no easier for the thought that he should 
have known better, and that there is still time to acquire the 
habit of voting. 

A lady of evident education and refinement, the wife of 

an enlisted man, takes energetic and forceful exception to the 
declaration of an evening paper that the United States Army 
is recruited chiefly from the haunts of disreputable characters, 
and that it is the final refuge of vagrants, dope fiends and bums. 
The lady is giving herself unnecessary concern, and should not 
feel surprised that "the loyal citizens in the Presidio" have not 
flown to the defense of an institution that needs none. The 
monstrous and unmitigable malevolence of this glib writer 
is anything but elevating to either himself or the masters whom 
he serves, but against the object of his attack his vengeful as- 
saults fall harmlessly and unnoticed. The strongest contempt 
is not infrequently expressed by silence. 

What fools we Americans are! Of all the people in the 

world who can be bamboozled, hoodwinked, duped, demagogued, 
insulted or despoiled, we are the easiest played upon. The 
most of us who have a cent are just now over kow-towing to 
King George, so the wave of indignation that should be sweep- 
ing over the country at Russia's affront to Americans armed, 
with passports from our Secretary of State will hit few of the 
elect. We are a proud people and quick to resent an affront 
provided it is directed at our pockets, but with nobody to in- 
form us that we are being otherwise insulted, how the deuce 
are we to know it? 

Speaking of the lyric performances of a loathed contem- 
porary, an editor says that if you put a beggar on horseback he 
will ride to the devil, and that if a poor devil of a plodding 
editor is placed astride Parnassus with his head in the clouds 
and his brains dangling on either side, something is bound to 
give way. "Astride of Parnassus" calls for an almighty big 
straddle and a split act wider than that of the Colossus of 
Rhodes, or the longirostral dirdums of an Orpheum circuit 
soubrette. How can a poor devil of a plodding editor be ex- 
pected to bestride Pamassus when he cannot even straddle 
Pegasus ? 

The Bureau of Corporations makes the disclosure that 

"there is no money for stockholders in merged corporations." I 
regard such disclosure as being in the highest degree indis- 
creet, for is not ignorance bliss, and is it not folly to put the 
stockholder wise to his discontent, so long as he is, seemingly, 
satisfied to pocket his 15 or 20 per cent dividends and permit 
his capital to remain patriotically invested for the benefit of 
the consuming public? 



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San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 




Robberies are frequent, but once in a while one will be 
brought to notice that is absolutely unique in its planning and 
the perfection with which it is carried out. A couple of law- 
yers were swapping yarns the other day, and one of them told 
the following story: 

A few years ago a young college chap with the near-to-nature 
bee in his bonnet, decided to follow his inclinations and get 
out in the wilds for a time. Accordingly he went forth and 
purchased a portable house and appropriate furniture for the 
little shack and had it shipped to Redding. From there it was 
taken east by wagon, and put up in the loneliest canyon he 
could find. With the purchase of a horse and a cow, the near- 
to nature artist settled down to get next. 

Everything went fine for about a week. What with the close 
companionship of trees and grass and birds and wild flowers, 
the seeker after the simple life was fast reaching a state of 
ecstatic happiness. Then one day the outside world obtruded. 
He must go for the mail and a new stock of eats, for be it 
known that even the most inspired of nature's devotees must 
feed his face. So he saddled his horse, and early in the morn- 
ing set out for town. Now the trip to Redding and back occu- 
'pied the greater part of an entire day, and the afternoon shad- 
ows were fast lengthening when at last the landlord returned 
to his little farm. Putting up the horse, he went to get his cow, 
which he had staked out on the hillside. What was his dis- 
may to find the stake still in place with a foot or more of rope 
still clinging to it, but the milk wagon and the remainder of 
the rope was nowhere to be seen. The next day he scoured 
the surrounding country for a glimpse of his Jersey, but she 
had vanished completely. Resigning himself to Fate, but not 
to creamless coffee, he once more drove to town to lay in a 
supply of the canned kind. While there he reported the theft 
of his cow, and as soon as possible was on the homeward way. 

Reaching his shanty late in the afternoon, he attended to the 
wants of his horse, and then went up to the house. On opening 
the door, he gasped in astonishment. The walls and floor were 
as bare of furnishing of any kind as on the day of his original 
purchase. Even the window curtains were gone. 

There was nothing to be done until the next day, so he com- 
posed himself to sleep as best he could on the hard floor, and. 
in the morning, bright and early, was on the road for Redding 
and vengeance. He told his remarkable story, but the law 
moves slowly, and it was afternoon before he left town, accom- 
panied by a posse. The men made fairly good time, but the 
sun was well along on its western journey by the time they en- 
tered the canyon. And then a sorry sight met their eyes ! Only 
a few scattered blocks of wood marked the place where the 
little two-room house had held its own. The thieves had re- 
turned at the first opportunity and carried the structure away 
bodily. 

The dispossessed owner dismounted and sat down weakly 
under a tree. "Now, what d'ye know about that?" he asked in 
disgust. "Too bad I didn't walk to town this morning; they 
might have had a nice saddle horse to add to the collection." 

They struck the trail, which was easily followed, and pur- 
sued the escaping party for a matter of ten miles or more with- 
out, however, catching a glimpse of their quarry. Finally at 



a fork of the road the wagon tracks were obscured by the many 
footprints of a flock of sheep, and try as they would, the search- 
ers were unable to again pick it up. Suddenly the disgruntled 
owner called off the hunt and announced his intention of going 
back. 

"What're you going to do?" asked one of the horsemen. 

"What am I going to do?" asked the other, sarcastically. 
"Why, I'm going back and camp on the foundations of my 
house and see that they don't steal the blamed well." 
*r ?r S 

Among the distinguished visitors in San Francisco at present 
is Fred Yates, the artist, whose portraits of distinguished Lon- 
doners in recent years have won him international fame. Yates 
has been away from San Francisco for twenty-one years, and 
his return to the scenes of his earlier endeavors has been a 
source of much pleasure to his many friends here. Primarily, 
however, the object of his visit was the painting of a portrait 
of Judge Henry A. Melvin. which he presented, the other day, 
to the Bohemian club. 

Shortly after finishing the picture the Judge and Mr. Yates 
were showing it to a group of friends, and the latter remarked : 

"You see on the front will be the name plate, and on the back 
of the canvas I intend to put not only Judge Melvin's name in 
full, but his title as well. That will serve to identify the por- 
trait throughout the years to come long after I am up in the 
clouds." 

Judge Melvin looked up with a quizzical smile. 

"You seem to be quite sure, Fred, which direction you'll 
take," he remarked. 

S ~S 5 

E. Curtis, the well-known auctioneer, is a Southerner — not the 
make-believe kind from Missouri or West Virginia or Texas, 
but the real thing from below the Mason and Dixon line in the 
good old State of Louisiana. In consequence he has never 
quit fighting, and his rebellion dates from the Civil War right 
up to now. 

The other day he was talking to a friend who dearly loves to 
get a rise out of the peppery Southerner. Veering the conver- 
sation around to the negro question, the friend who is a West- 
erner, launched into a eulogy of the colored race, citing Booker 
T. Washington as an example of what the darkies could do if 
given a fighting chance. Curtis listened, and more than once 




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July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



tried to interrupt the Westerner's flow of eloquence. Finally 
he broke in cholerically : 

"Let me tell you one thing, suh, you don't know what you're 
talking about. The average niggah is the most wuthless piece 
of flesh ever invented, and in his natural state isn't wuth a 
continental damn. Keep him in his place and he's all right." 

"But," protested his friend, "you must admit, Curtis, that in 
the matter of physical courage he is the equal of an average 
white man." 

"I'll admit nothing o£ the kind, suh; he's a bohn coward, that 
is what he is." 

"I can't agree with you there," declared the other. "If you 
remember, it was a negro regiment that led the United States 
army into Santiago." 

Curtis looked disconcerted, but only for a minute. 

"I'll tell you how that was," he remarked with a cheerful 
grin: "I have it on the best authority. Just before marching 
orders arrived, some man with a Machiavellian brain spread the 
report through the colored ranks that down in Santiago there 
was an army of chickens waiting to be captured. And I tell 
you, suh, there was no holding those niggahs back!" 
"6" S S 

Rufus Steele, the well-known Bohemian clubman and maga- 
zine writer, is possessed of a quick and ready wit. He always 
has a clever answer on the tip of his tongue. The other day 
he was one of a group of which Arthur Putnam was also a 
member. Putnam had just finished a bronze upon which he 
has been working, and the friends were plying him with ques- 
tions. The finished piece is one of a series of figures upon 
which Putnam has been at work for some time, each of which 
is planned to represent some period of the historical growth of 
California. Putnam was explaining as best he could what had 
been done and what he was planning to do in the future. 

"How many have you finished, Arthur?" asked one. 

"Three," replied Putnam. "The Indian, the padre and the 
ploughman." 

"How many more will there be," queried another. 

"Why, I haven't exactly decided," replied the artist. "Of 
course, there will be the miner, and probably a figure represen- 
tative of the agricultural growth of the State, and then " 

"And then," broke in Steele quickly, "Arthur's going to do a 
colossal figure and label it 'The Southern Pacific' " 
5 o- 5 

Few have been such an adornment to local society as Donald 
Shorb. Consequently society is desperate at the rumor. Did 
or did not, some ruthless barber of inartistic disposition make 
careless inroad on the Shorb lollop of hair, worn so long to the 
desperation of bald-headed confreres. The fatal news has 
spread rapidly. In sundry corners shining pates of society talk 
it over with glee. Women wear a concerned look. Shorb, him- 
self, cannot be found. It is reported that he has taken to the 
woods. During the last few days friends have searched in vain 
for him, and the catastrophe is being accepted on all sides as 
true. But the Lookeron would inform his readers that the cir- 
cumstances of the case are not so bad as envious masculine 
souls relate. The new wild man glimpsed recently by several 
in the vicinity of Hillsborough is not Shorb. At the same time, 
having exact information, we must speak the deplorable truth. 
Shorb has had a hair-cut. It wasn't his fault, so he cannot be 
blamed for it. Consequently his friends should bear with 
him in exile. As for the barber who accepted the ten-spot to 
pull the trick — ne should be stabbed to death with his own 
shears. The briber and would-be joker, who slipped the coin, 
has already been summarily dealt with by more than one charm- 
ing miss not at all inclined to forget her Samson in his destitu- 
tion. Donald was always popular. When his hair grows he will 
be so again. For the benefit of the worrying ones, we would 



state that in the meantime he is simply keeping to the house. 
Among the tall timbers he might have been compelled to asso- 
ciate with the barbarous — barbers, for instance. At home, on 
the other hand, he is more or less safe. Once, through virtue 
of a wide sombrero, he even ventured to go out. But, as luck 



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THINK IT OVER 



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Sunday Return San Francisco, 1:15, 5:00, 6:50 P. M. 



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Telephone Market 46 



Low Excursion 
Rates 



Observation 
Cars 



Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet of rerfumed powdered leaves to 

carrv in the purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly 1m- 
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: Great Jones 3L. N Y 



8 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



would have it, the young lady he met noticed his misfortune in 
an instant. 

"Oh, Mr. Shorb," she sighed, "and you looked so much like 
Goethe." 

"Never mind, Margaret; it will be alright after a while. Do 
I look so bad, then ?" 

"Do not call me that," she sighed. 

"But I always have." 

"Yes, but I do not want you to talk like Mephistopheles, too." 

5 8 S 
The Municipal Conference, with all its troubles, is a happy 
organization. Its work of selection is well over. Eighteen good 
men it has chosen for supervisors, and it is as sure to elect the 
majority of them as it is James Rolph, Jr., for Mayor. Mayor 
McCarthy, looking into the future, is beginning to see political 
ghosts. He is acting in a dazed way, most unbecoming to a 
frock coat. In every woodpile he beholds a nigger — a Johnson 
for his destruction. While there is little doubt that his premoni- 
tions will all come to pass, it would look better for him to shy 
less at Fate, and at least appear confident until the end. His 
charge against the World's Fair Company that they are delaying 
the site for political reasons is the most foolish sort of rot. With 
the site selected, he sees an army of union men rushing to the 
city to register at the primaries — an army of the imagination. 
Is it not too bad the World's Fair Company would not forget 
everything else to convenience them. The Barbary Coast or 
south of Market street would do for a site, provided it lent 
assistance to the election of McCarthy. However, as the par- 
ticular subject of a cataclysm, the Mayor has our sympathy. 
The number of Rolph clubs being formed, and the unanimity 
of public sentiment behind them, is enough to swamp even a 
more optimistic temperament. At a Rolph meeting the other 
evening, Henry M. Owens made a rather brilliant speech. His 
dulcet tones set C. T. Reese to nodding his handsome head in 
slumber. It was Hermann Morris, president, who, with a slap 
on the shoulder, brought the delinquent back to political con- 
sciousness, just as the applause following the peroration had 
died away. 

"Are you awake, Reese?" he inquired. "Are you awake?" 
Slowly Reese passed his hand over his eyes. "A wake!" he 
ejaculated, startled. "Oh, McCarthy's! Is the election over so 
soon?" 

S S S 

Mrs. Gertrude Atherton has become a pronounced suffragist. 
At least she says she is, and the Equal Suffrage League, in 
honor of her opinions, lunched her at the Palace Hotel but a day 
or so ago. Mrs. Atherton, of course, made a speech becoming 
the occasion. Poor, down-trodden women, she prophesied, 
would yet rise to her proper place — that is, unless she happened 
to be already sitting at the end of the table. Man, whether from 
Missouri or not, would be shown; not the things he had always 
insisted upon, but others. The world was gradually breaking 
away from the cobwebbed conventions of antiquity, and in the 
future when woman stamped her foot, man would hold his toe, 
right or left as it might be, and howl. Etc., etc. It was all bril- 
liant and quite up to the Atherton standard. If it had not been 
sipping — just sipping — champagne, the banqueters might have 
cried over the prospect. Anyway it was a good old world to 
live in — or would be. After it was all over the manager of the 
Palace met Mrs. Atherton in the lobby. Eagerly she introduced 
her new creed, hoping perhaps to convert him. 

"What is a suffragist?" he asked. 

"Why, a woman who stands up for her rights," replied the au- 
thoress. 

"I suppose by that you mean her husband," slyly suggested 
the manager. 



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L A 



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July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 




Germany Joins 

China in Mexico. 



Germany has joined China in mak- 
ing a cash demand on the Govern- 
ment of Mexico for maltreatment of 
certain subjects of the Kaiser who 
were there engaged in business enterprises during the life-time 
of the revolution. France and England, too, are preparing in 
a diplomatic way as a starter to safeguard valuable invest- 
ments, and in circles where chancellors are prone to give un- 
official opinions for the public to talk about, and give them the 
worst possible interpretation, the rumor has been started that in 
dealing with Mexico, Germany, France and England may feel 
obliged to give the Monroe Doctrine an interpretation from the 
view point of the several hundred million dollars the subjects 
of the three nations named have planted in the Mexican Repub- 
lic. Perhaps a Berlin newspaper voices the public sentiment 
concerning the Monroe Doctrine — -very likely the opinion of 
the Government as well — v/hen it says that inasmuch as the 
United States does not recognize the right of a foreign country 
to invade a Latin-American State and force the payment of 
debts by seizing territory, if necessary, it is incumbent upon 
the American or Washington Government to itself undertake 
the collection of such debts, or guarantee them. If the Wash- 
ington Government objects to that, it would be justified by in- 
ternational law, common honesty and a proper sense of the 
right in stepping aside while foreign creditors were making 
their own collections, with soldiers and warships, if force shall 
be found to be needed. The American people have not kept 
themselves well advised concerning the policy of the Madero 
regime, because, no doubt, they could not make themselves be- 
lieve that Mexico threatens war upon capital, especially on 
American capital, or at least the belief has prevailed all along 
that in any event no attempt at anything like confiscation of 
American or foreign investments would be attempted. But an 
attack has been made, and that is why certain nations of Europe 
are becoming anxious for a new interpretation of the Monroe 
Doctrine, and the worst feature of the policy of the new Mexi- 
can regime is an effort to engender a hostile sentiment all over 
Mexico against American and foreign capitalists because ex- 
President Diaz was unduly favorable to their schemes. They 
have gone so far as to say that the Standard Oil Company and 
American Tobacco Corporation were "pets" of Diaz, and should 
be wiped out. The same charges are made against what are 
called the "Pearson interests," which represents investments in 
Mexico and Central America aggregating not far from one bil- 
lion dollars, and the American interests are assailed because of 
their friendly relations with the Pearson syndicate, both of 
which were in close touch with Diaz to his personal advantage. 
For these reasons, the new regime in Mexico proposes to assail 
all American and European capital invested in that nation. The 
aggregate sum of American and European money now invested 
in Mexico and Central America reaches nearly two billion dol- 
lars. The Pearson syndicate is closely identified with the 
American interests as well as with the investing public of Eng- 
land, France and Germany, for it either took over for its own 
account or floated many of the bonds of the American, English, 
French and German investments in Mexican railways, mines, 
plantations and municipal public service corporations. Thus 
it is seen that American investments are threatened as well as 
those of Europe. The new regime in Mexico is certainly mak- 
ing a serious blunder in threatening a policy of hostility to 
American capitalists, and it is a blunder to announce that no 
more concessions will be granted to Americans for any purpose. 
There are more than 75,000 American residents in Mexico who 
have a great deal of their own money invested in mines, rail- 
ways, factories, bankinc institutions, mercantile houses and 
other enterprises. England, France and Germany combined 
have not so many residents of Mexico, but there is as much 
money from these nations employed in various business enter- 
prises in that country and in Central America as there is of 
American capital. Of course the whole scheme is to discredit 
Diaz, and make him the excuse for any ruinous policy that the 
regime may elect to adopt, and it would seem their aim is to 



make the masses of Mexico believe that the former President 
"stood in" with foreigners and conceded franchise privileges 
of enormous value, thus robbing the people of the Republic. 
They are not a hard people to inflame with hatred, nor would 
it be difficult to so incite them that they would insist upon the 
annulment of existing franchises and concessions without any 
effort on their part to compensate foreign investors for their 
losses. No doubt such a scheme would be convenient for the 
Mexican masses. They will forget, too, that when Diaz first 
took hold of the destinies of Mexico the population was 
8,000,000, and they numbered 15,000,000 when he left the 
country. During the same period, the railway mileage of Mex- 
ico grew from 360 miles to 19,000 miles. The telegraph mile- 
age, when he first assumed the presidency was practically none 
at all, but when he was driven out of the country it was over 
50,000 miles. Nevertheless, the policy of the new regime is to 
prejudice the masses against Diaz, against foreign owners of 
Mexican concessions, and especially against all sorts and con- 
ditions of Americans. It all may culminate in a demand from 
the nations that a few rails of the Monroe Doctrine fence be 
taken off. Mexico's dog in the manger policy does not appeal 
to Americans as strongly as it did a month or so ago. 



The Postmaster-General of Eng- 
Of General Interest. land announces that his bureau pro- 
poses to take over the entire tele- 
phone system of the country; reduce the charge for plain lan- 
guage cable messages 50 per cent; reduce the telephone rate 
to France 50 per cent ; expedite mail service to the United States 
and give English farmers unlimited telephone service for $15. 

The Russian Douma has voted an appropriation of $7,500,000 
annually for the improvement of harbors, and ordered four new 
battleships for the Baltic squadron. 

John Burns, Laborite, M. P., was honored the other day by 
being invited to open the new water supply works for London 
— two reservoirs — covering 175 acres, with a capacity of 1,200,- 
000,000 gallons of water. 

In the parade of the suffragists in London during the corona- 
tion festivities women from twenty nations participated, in- 
cluding women members of religious, labor unions and profes- 
sional organizations, each nation and organization carrying a 
suitable banner. 

More than 10,000,000 pounds of dynamite a year are required 
to make way for a complete Panama Canal. 

Melbourne, Victoria, Board of Trade reports that more than 
350 tons of butter leave Victoria every week for foreign mar- 
kets. Since July, 1910, 21,880 tons have been exported, valued 
at $11,500,000. The United Kingdom, South Africa and the 
Far East are the largest buyers. Preparations are being made 
to try the butter markets of the Pacific Coast of the United 
States. 



J. Spaulding & Co., carpet beaters, are the pioneer steam 

machine carpet beaters in San Francisco. They make a specialty 
of relaying carpets, and give special attention to carpet dyeing. 
The office and works are located at 353-357 Tehama street. 
Telephones Douglas 3084 and Home J 2347. Immediate re- 
sponse to 'phone calls. 




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COLLECTED ANO EDITED B\ LEOPOLD JORDAN. 



Potsdam, February 12, .1909. 
Mein dear Oncle Evenheart — 

Much pleasure it gifts me to write to you to der extent dat der 
core of mein heart has a feeling of joy, und vhy ? Dis : 

Der Count Von Schweibackerderkovetelazen met me Unter 
der Linden yesterday. He had yoost returned from de village 
of London, vere, he told me, you are all plump crazy vid a game 
dey call Pridge. 

Der Count Von Schweibackerderkovetzelazen informed me 
you yourself played at der game, und he liked it much. He gave 
me to understand it is a pridge dat is liaple to preak down, und 
you lose yourselves zo soon on der pridge dat some fall in a 
hole, und, he says, it takes money to get dem out. 

As I like to know all tings on der poard, you vould pe so kind 
to give me some idea of der gaze zo ve can play it as a family 
recreation. Zo mein dear Oncle, send me der prescription at 
vonce, as ve are needing a new game for der family uses. 

It's not like ping-pong, is it? Yes? No? If it should pe, 
den I vant it not. 

Der Count Von Schweibackerderkovetzelazen vas in zo 



grrreat a hurry to catch der train for Monte Carlo, or he vould 
haff explained der game for me, vich vould haff saved you all 
dis trouple I imposition upon you. Vaste no time, as dere is 
much ennui in dese parts, vich is against mein principles. 

Your loving nephew, 

Whalem. 



Castlebridge-on-the-Thames, February 17, 1909. 
My well-beloved Nephew, Whaley: 

In accord with your wish, I hasten to give you the informa- 
tion asked as to the game of bridge. There is no fear of ennui 
where it is introduced, and, I know, during the winter evenings 
you and the dear children will enjoy it. 

Bridge is unlike ping pong, and is really not only innocent, 
but exhilarating. I will now give you the rules of the game. 
You can call the family together, say about 8:15 o'clock in 
the evening, though the hour is really immaterial — it might as 
well be 8:15 o'clock in the morning. When you are all together, 
you call in a fear-sticken voice, "London Bridge is falling 
down," the signal for quick action. With this fearful warning 




July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



of impending catastrophe, you and your family close in, and 
covering your ears with your hands that you shall not hear the 
crash of the splintering bridge, all excepting yourself crouch in 
simulated awe. With intrepid steps, fearful of bodily injury, 
you then retreat to a corner, where, huddled together, you simu- 
late the cold shivers, your teeth chatter, your knees knock, your 
hands shake as though with palsy stricken, your eyes pop from 
their sockets and each hair on your cranium changes its position 
to one balancing on end like quills on the fretful porcupine. 
Again you, as leader, will shriek once more, "London Bridge is 
falling down," and terror must overtake all who by this time 
are wailing, grinding the teeth, shaking, reeking in sadness and 
grief. The third warning of impending destruction of the bridge 
must come with the accompaniment of a nerve-racking clap of 
thunder and flashes of lightning, all of which you have had 
prepared preparatory to the game by a competent stage mana- 
ger, who can be had by the hour at reasonable cost. 

At the first awful peal of thunder, don't forget this, because 
it is so important to the effectiveness of the game, all but your- 
self fall flat on their faces, and you, standing erect with mantle 
thrown around you a la Napoleon, face the torrential storm in 
defiance. At each blinding flash of pitchfork lightning you 
valiently thrust your sword; then comes a peal of ear-racking 
bolts that rend the heavens and shiver the atmosphere. Here 
your heroic stand shows itself, and you can take it out of the 
others. Blushing at their timidity, for they are still flat on their 
stomachs, you give them a whack with the hilt of your sword on 
their prostrate forms and command them to arise. As they are 
about so to do, your stage manager repeats his noisy counter- 
feiting of nature's wrath, and once more they flop to the floor 
with their teeth grasping the rugs or carpets, whichever is the 
more convenient. You, in haughty pose, look down with sorrow 
on the display of abject cowardice, and as you cry: "Begone, 
fools! Is it thus you would leave me alone to perish?" by a 
clever contrivance, which your Royal carpenter will arrange at 
small cost, the floor opens, and those in the game fall through it 
with wails and shrieks and heart-rending moans. They won't 
hurt themselves, because of the thoughtful precautions taken 
to have feather bedding laid on the floor of the room beneath, 
upon which they will land. Left alone to brave the wild, dis- 
torted fractured elements, you look down into the chasm, and 
to a weird chorus which mournfully arises, you chant: 

"London Bridge is falling down 
Falling down, falling down, 
London Bridge is falling down — 
How many centuries falling?" 

Then the Union Jack, with the flag of Saint George, is 
hoisted — I don't suppose you'll have any objection to this es- 
sential part of the game being carried out — and red, white and 
blue fire illuminates the scene, and you are in the act of 
dancing the "Sailors' Hornpipe" when all those who have taken 
part re-appear, and forming themselves into a ring, one of the 
prettiest girls having placed a wreath of laurel upon your now 
placid brow, dance hand in hand around you, singing: 

"London Bridge is falling down 
Falling down, falling down, 
London Bridge is falling down — 
How many centuries falling?" 

And the band strikes up "God Save the King," which is in- 
dispensable to the perfect playing of bridge. 

Though personally you might prefer "Die Wacht Am Rhein." 
such an innovation would prove a shock to those who are devo- 
tees of bridge. You will see, nephew dear, there is much in the 
game that is patriotic and wholesome. 

It is purely allegorical. For instance : 

Disaster to the bridge, which means really the nation, is 
feared, and against the wails of the croakers the King stands 
erect, defiant of enemies, magnificent in composure and ready 
to surmount all obstacles : the croakers croak on and croak off, 
but in spite of torrents of opposition, the King towers above 
them all in his strength and pity. Threats are heard, heard in 
the terrible thundei and blustering blasts, and the croakers fall 
flat on their faces in abject fear, and still the King stands, tow- 
ers, above all. At last, hurt unto his breast at the sight of the 
affrighted croakers, with the hilt of his sword he slaps them a 
swift spank on their prostrate forms, and in disgust drops them 
over the parapet of the trembling earth. The clouds lift, the 
high colors of heaven descend, the Union Jack with the flag of 



Saint George floats on the breezes, and the croakers return to 
earth to crown with laurel their King and gambol with joy and. 
elation because the storms have cleared, and all being serene, 
they have become brave. 

In the last line of the stanza, "London Bridge is falling 
down," you will note the significance of the allegory: "How 
many centuries falling?" 

The only bet permissible in the game is when the chorus of 
croakers sing, "London Bridge is falling down," and you can 
bet it isn't. 

Get a kodak and be taken playing bridge with the dear child- 
ren, and send the picture quick to 

Your affectionate uncle, 

EVENHKART R. 



(A startling stolen letter of the President, written from the 
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Ride a cock-horse al! the way to Banbury Cross, and you will 
not see a knowing-looking woman on a white horse. For styles 
have changed in horses and habits since the days of Mother 
Goose, when women rode on snow-white palfreys in green 
velvet riding habits. 

To-day, Eleonoro Sears, or "Bobby," as her friends call her, 
stands for the type, or rather rides off with the honors of fit 
horsemanship which takes account not only of horsemanship, 
but of habit. 

Green velvet has gone out with fainting spells and smelling 
salts, and even in the profane days of Queen Elizabeth, when 
women could rip out oaths with impunity, they could not sit a 
horse in comfort. 

There are several styles of horsemanship to-day, and each 
style has its mode of dress. What is sauce for the effete parks 
is not sauce for the wild woods, and in consequence the woman 
who rides must have an elastic wardrobe of togs that will ex- 
pand to the demands of city and country riding. Everywhere 
the cross-saddle is gaining in respectability, and one may now 
ride astride in town without incurring the reproach of unlady- 
like behavior, but the color and even the cut of the cross-saddle 
habit has geographical differences. 

Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent, who, as Maude Bourn, was one of 
the best horsewomen in San Francisco, recently wrote from her 
home in England that cross-saddle riding is now considered an 
irreproachable custom, and since King George and Queen Mary 
have advocated it, one sees the daughters of most conservative 
families riding in that fashion. Queen Mary will not hobble 
her feet, and she has not hobbled her mind either on the sub- 
ject of riding, for her daughter rides astride, and all the young 
girls in the royal set are now using the cross-saddle. Mrs. 
Vincent, Jennie Crocker and Eleonoro Sears were the three girls 
who practiced polo so assiduously two or three seasons ago, and 
finally induced some of the men to play a match game with 
them. 

This is the season when every one who rides at all indulges 
in the sport, so the fashion of dressing the part can be appro- 
priately exploited now. Habit modes are divided into three 
classes, the conventional side-saddle habit, the divided skirt 
habit, and the long coat and breeches habit, and the extrava- 
gant rider orders all there, adapting the costume to place and 
occasion. One rarely sees a side saddle habit here, for the 
women of the West are still the most emancipated in that re- 
gard. Perhaps it is because the Californian out-Kentuckys the 
Kentuckian in love of horses that it is practically impossible 
in any small town or resort in California to hire a good horse if 
a side saddle is to be used, the owners of the horses declaring 
that poor riding and a side saddle will ruin the back of a horse 
in one day. 

Like everything else ready-made, there have been tremen- 
dous strides in ready-made riding togs, and even a fastidious 
rider can now stock up her outfit in a smart shop without go- 
ing through the ordeal and taking the time to have the togs 
made to order. I went in search of riding clothes for a friend 
who was unexpectedly going to spend a month in Santa 
Barbara, and we found a large assortment of well-cut and well- 
made togs. The absolute severity of riding clothes throws all 
the responsibility of their success upon cut and fit, and one must 
cast a severe and censorious eye upon the lines of ready-made 
things — but even the tailor does not always give inspired -re- 
sults in riding clothes, and an expert judge can find very satis- 
factory ready-made things. 

For out-of-town wear there is a growing liking for the tan 
or dust color lightweight coverts, whipcords, khaki and such 
fabrics, and they certainly show the dust less readily than the 
dark clothes, but on the other hand they are not so becoming 
and are not so kind to an overplump figure. My friend is — 
well,_ she casts more shadow than goes with attenuation, and 
she is aware of the fact. So she discarded the very light tan 
assortment and chose a very dark brown whipcord, long coat 
and breeches costume. The loosely-fitted coat falls past the 
boot-tops, and when on the horse this coat is held down to the 
knees by straps so that its skirt divides and falls smoothly on 
each side of the saddle, and does not blow back to show the 
breeches. 

Soft, unstarched riding blouses of madras, linen and India 



silk are shown, to be worn under coats, or in the country may 
be used with the riding skirt without the coat. The riding 
blouse must be of the severest tailored kind, and may have 
a high turn-down negligee collar for informal occasions, or 
a regulation riding stock. The soft India silk blouses of the 
admirable quality provided by the fashionable shirt makers is 
increasingly popular with equestriennes, and indeed for all 
sporting purposes. 

Boots of soft tan leather are the coolest wear for summer, 
though black boots are always good looking, save with the tan 
and brown habits. The majority of riders now buy their ooots 
ready-made. 

The Derby hat holds first place for winter and formal eques- 
trianism, but the wide brim sailor and Continental shapes in 
straw are the popular summer hats. Englishwomen like a 
rather wide brim Derby of fine straw, and it has its merits, 
but it has not been accepted here. The straight brimmed sailors 
and continental or tri-cornered are considered better form than 
the soft straws or felts which are seen, and are very comfort- 
able, for they may be pulled down over the eyes, but while 
comfortable and sometimes becoming, they never have the cor- 
rect air. Black patent leather is still the most popular material 
for informal riding. 

If a woman can only afford one habit, experts would advise 
against the breeches and long coat model, and the type most 
accredited for general wear is the divided skirt and short coat. 
There is a choice in coats, many riders adhering to the snug, 
close-fitting coat that gives such neat, trim, taut lines. But the 
more fashionable coat is the semi-fitting one, and down Bur- 
lingame way the younger contingent has come out in loose box- 
coats and Norfolks. 

Having advised that the divided skirt costume is the best for 
the woman who wants or can afford only one habit, the sage 
counsellor proceeds to instruct a purchaser in the folly of hav- 
ing only one habit. It is penny-foolish to make one habit work 
summer and winter when for a few dollars one can have a sum- 
mer habit, and so save the more expensive town habit the wear 
and tear of cross-country riding. Amateur and home-made 
habits are usually a failure, but one can buy inexpensive ones 
in light-weight coverts, wools, khakis and linens. Linen habits 
are very much worn this summer at Del Monte, Santa Barbara 
and other fashionable resorts. To supplement a good dark habit 
one or two linen habits are desirable, if one can afford to have 
them, the linen being of the soft, rather heavy but loose-woven 
crash kind, which will be cool, yet keep its shape, and not 
wrinkle without any encouragement like the smooth linen which 
crumples up apparently through mere cussedness. For hard 
summer wear a brown or tan covert cloth is a sane and sober 
purchase, and pays dividends for several seasons. 

In these specialized days there is special jewelry manufac- 
tured as an accessory to the riding habit. Cravat pins and hat 
pins are "sporty" in design, fashioned like a whip, a horse- 
shoe or something equally applicable to the sport. No knowing 
rider would wear a butterfly or fancy pin — it would be the em- 
blem of a "duffer." All the sports have a creed of good form 
that extends to the accessories to the very way in which a rid- 
ing crop is carried. It does not suffice to wear a smart habit 
if the accessories are not in established form. Fortunately, 
styles in riding togs are not so whimsical as in every-day dress, 
and when once a rider is properly equipped, there is little dan- 
ger of going out of style before the things wear out. 



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July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



13 




IMME'S*) 



lO, 4fyj» amJ W&OV6-S./U4 




Mrs. Fiske at the Columbia. 

It has always been hard for me to determine whether I liked 
Mrs. Fiske best in serious roles or as a comedienne. After see- 
ing her delightful characterization of "Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh" 
I verily believe that she is the most entertaining and charming 
comedienne our English-speaking stage possesses at the present 
day. For sheer unction and those delicate touches of comedy 
which only the consummate artist can show, Mrs. Fiske in this 
play rises head and shoulders above them all. Possibly it may 
have been her good fortune to have secured a play which fitted 
her unusual temperament and personality, but be that as it 
may, she gives us a performance which is a revelation in many 
ways. In the many roles I have seen Mrs. Fiske enact for 
some years, I have never before seen her place so much zest 
and spirit in her performance. She seems to enjoy the role so 
thoroughly that it appears to be a positive pleasure for her to 
romp through the play nightly. Mrs. Fiske must also be given 
the credit of discovering a new playwright in the person of 
Harry Smith. He has written a comedy which is away from 
the conventional in construction and theme. In places he 
plainly shows that he has yet a lot to learn, but his wit is so 
sparkling and his situations so broadly humorous that we must 
stamp the play as a big success. If this is the first effort of 
the gentleman, we shall certainly look for still better things to 
follow. In instances, Mr. Smith drags his scenes, and in one 
or two places they seem talky; in fact, the first act somewhat 
bores you until Mrs. Fiske comes on the stage, when the action 
brightens perceptibly, and from then on, all is joy and mer- 
riment. 

The plot is simple, but on the whole rather clever. I am not 
surprised that New York liked the play. It is hard to imagine 





Chauncey Olcott in his nen play. "MacasMa," at the Colum- 
bia Theatre. 



Emma Dunn, the famous actress who will appear next week 
at the Orpheum. 

that Mrs. Fiske, who gave us such a powerful performance of 
"Salvation Nell" is the accomplished comedienne bubbling 
over with high spirits as "Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh." The whole 
affair is capital entertainment, and like most comedies, would 
not bear dissecting, but it manages to get the laughs, and, best 
of all, it is clean comedy. In this country we may not have as 
many clever writers of comedies as France can boast, but we 
.can feel proud of the fact that those which are turned out by our 
countrymen are of a brand which we can afford to allow our 
sisters and sweethearts and wives to see without the blush of 
shame rising to our chaste brows. And if we do not happen 
to be the possessor of a chaste brow and a clean mind, we can 
enjoy a clean play anyhow. 

It is too bad that Mrs. Fiske is not to be with us for the cus- 
tomary two weeks, but it seems that booking arrangements take 
her away from us at the end of this week, which fact is to be 
keenly regretted, as Mrs. Fiske is a big favorite here, where 
her splendid efforts are always enjoyed by all our discriminat- 
ing play-goers. Mrs. Fiske, as always, has surrounded herself 
with a competent company. In Florine Arnold she has a 
mighty clever character woman whose performance of Mrs. De 
Salle is a delight. It is a distinct creation, and so is the Peter 
Swallow of Malcolm Duncan. Swallow is on the stage about 
half an act, but you can never forget him. It is about the big- 
best part for the time that he is on the stage that I have seen in 
a long time. The role was done in New York by Henry Dixie, 
and then I believe it was done by Tim Murphy. Malcolm Dun- 
can, who does the part here, shows much cleverness and a 
certain amount of characterization. The part is such a good 
one that in professional parlance they would say "it would play 
itself." Duncan should, however, be given due credit for a 
clever performance. Cyril Young as Kitson was also very good. 

The cast was uniformly excellent, and there is not a weak 
spot in the entire company. Mrs. Fiske is her own stage direc- 
tor, and she has always shown decided cleverness by her man- 
agement of her situations, and her adeptness in this respect. 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



The one setting is complete in every respect, and looks like the 
real thing. If you want splendid comedy excellently acted, do 
not miss Mrs. Fiske and her clever work in a clever play, as- 
sisted by a very clever company. It is a genuine treat which 

one should not miss. 

* * * 

"Old Heidelberg" at the Alcazar. 

The Alcazar is presenting that good old play, "Old Heidel- 
berg," this week. Thurlow Bergen takes the part of Karl Hein-. 
rich, the unhappy prince, and portrays the part delightfully, 
especially in his scenes with Kathie and his old tutor. 

"Old Heidelberg" tells of Karl Heinrich, hereditary prince 
of Sachen-Karlsburg, who .is sent to spend a year at the great 
German university before he attains his majority. His life has 
been spent in comparative seclusion, under the tutelage of old 
Doctor Juttner, and at college all the pent-up vigor of his youth 
comes out, and he falls in love with the innkeeper's niece. While 
in the height of his enjoyment he is summoned to the throne, 
so he bids adieu to Kathie, promising to return after the coro- 
nation. When he makes good that promise, Old Heidelberg is 
not to him what it wa«. His former chums treat him with the 
deference due a monarch, and his final parting with Kathie is 
one of the most pathetic love scenes ever staged. 

Miss Roberts enacts the role of Kathie, the charming dis- 
penser of ambrosia at the students' inn. The role does not 
permit Miss Roberts to shov; her great versatility as an actress, 
but the bits she gives are sufficient to bring tears to the eyes of 
the fair sex and make the sterner sex surreptitiously wipe 
glistening eyes. 

Aside from its pretty story and engaging characters, "Old 
Heidelberg" possesses a wealth of fascinating atmosphere. This 
is chiefly maintained through the frolics of the nattily-uni- 
formed students, with their songs rich in harmonies and melodi- 
ous phrases. 

Theodore Roberts, as old Dr. Juttner, tutor of the heir ap- 
parent, does his part very well. His acting this week is up to 
his high standard of work. The other members are also very 

good, and deserve praise for the excellent support they give. 

* * * 

The Orpheum. 

Among the newcomers at the Orpheum this week, perhaps 
the best is Gene Greene in a selection of character songs. The 
songs are sung to catchy, melodious tunes, and are all in a 
happy vein. The humor is brought out forcefully by Mr. 
Greene, who has an original and pleasing way of singing char- 
acter songs. There are many laughs furnished by his various 
types. Charles Straight at the piano aids much in making the 
act a success. 

The Bergere Players, in a skit entitled "Room 44," are excep- 
tionally clever. The playlet is rich in the element of suspense 
so essential to the drama. Valerie Bergere has in this act 
proved herself quite as successful as a producer as a player. 
She has secured a very capable company. Ruth Raynor, as 
"the woman," Edward Hemmer as the hotel proprietor, and 
Richard Basil as the bell-boy, are all admirably cast. 

"The Photo Shop" is light musical comedy. Among the hits 
in the show are "It's a Very Busy Day," "I Want You in My 
Picture," "It's Enough to Get the Girl," and "The Belle of 
Manhattan Isle." The act is staged with the care and good taste 
that is always displayed by Mr. Lasky. The action is brisk 
and fetching. The girls are pretty and clever in the singing 
and dancing numbers. The idea is novel, and altogether it is 
a most pleasing ensemble number. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

The merit of next week's Orpheum bill may be estimated 
from the fact that it will contain three entirely new headline 
acts in addition to other novelties. 

Al. Jolson, the famous black-face monologist and comedian, 
and the greatest star in his line in this or any other country, 
is playing his farewell season in vaudeville, and will entertain 
the Orpheum audiences next week only. 

_ Emma Dunn, who starred successfully in "Mother" for some 
time, and also played the Mother with the late Richard Mans- 
field in his production of "Peer Gynt," will be a special feature 
of the new programme. She will appear in John Stokes' olav- 
let, "The Baby." 

Another great attraction will be Willa Holt Wakefield, who 
has not appeared at the Orpheum for several years. Her long 



absence is owing to the fact that she has been in great demand 
in and around New York, for she has a knack of entertaining 
that makes her immensely popular. 

The Charles Ahearn Cycling Comedians will present a novel 
offering in which skillful wheeling and genuine comedy alter- 
nate. 

Next week will be the last of Gene Green, the Marcel and 
Boris Trio, the Bergere Players in "Room 44," and Jesse L. 

Lasky 's "The Photo Shop." 

* * * 

"Macushla" (Pulse of My Heart) is the title of the new play 
which will be presented for the first time in this city at the 
Columbia Theatre on Sunday night, July 9th, by the romantic 
Irish actor, Chauncey Olcott, and company. The play is from 
the pen of the noted author, Rida Johnson Young, who in col- 
laboration with Rita Olcott furnished this popular star with 
"Ragged Robin," one of his greatest successes. The scenes 
of the play are laid in one of the most picturesque parts of Ire- 
land, and one identified with the greatest hunting and sporting 

sets of the old Irish gentry. 

* * * 

There are many new concessions to modernity in "The Mer- 
chant of Venice," which will be presented to Alcazar audiences 
next Monday evening, and throughout the week, with Theodore 
Roberts as Shylock, Florence Roberts as Portia, Thurlow Ber- 
gen as Bassanio, and the rest of ihe players appropriately be- 
stowed. Mr. Roberts revised Shakespeare's book in accord- 
ance with his belief that the stage is gradually emerging from 
the umbra of tradition that actors are using research rather 
than memory, and that the public is demanding more than the 
actor gives. 



A Northern lady with philanthropic symptoms was try- 
ing to instill a little economy into her husband's colored tenants. 
One of them, Mary Kinney, an anti-race-suicideist, kept a col- 
ored girl as nurse to her group of ten growing American citi- 
zens. "Mary," remarked the lady, "do you think a woman in 
your circumstances can afford a nurse?" "I dunno, 'm, as 
I kin, but I don't pay her but twenty-fi' cents a month, an' I pays 
dat in ole clo'es, and" — v/ith a wide smile — "she don't git 
dem !" — Exchange. 

Sutter and Steiner Streets. 

West 1400. Home S. 4242. 



Alcazar Theatre ™™ 



Monday evening, July 10th, and throughout the week, FLORENCE 
ROBERTS. THURLOW BERGEN, THEODORE ROBERTS, sup- 
ports] by tii'- Alcazar players in 

THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, 
A magnificent pictorial production. 

Prices — Night, 25c. to ?l; matinee, 25c. to 50c, Matinee Sal irdaj 
and Sunday. Seats on sale at box-Office and Emporium. 



Columbia Theatre 

Gottlob, Marx & Co., Managers. 



Corner Geary and Mason Sts. 
Phones Franklin 150. 
Home C 6783. 



Two weeks, beginning Sunday night. July 9th. Matinees Wednes- 
days and Saturdays, Augustus Pitou presents CHAUNCEY OL- 
COTT in his new play. 

"MACUSHLA" (Pulse of My Heart.) 
Hear Olcolt's four new songs. 
Prices— $1.50, ?1. 75c, 50c, 25c - 

NeW OrVheUTft O'Farrell Street, 
X¥fM/ W / JJIWWIIV Bet stockton and Powen . 

Safest and Mos.t Magnificent Theatre In America. 

Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

A GREAT NEW SHOW. 
AL. JOLSON. the World's Greatest Ulack-faee- Monologist inext 
week only); THE CHAS. AHEARN CYCLING PROl PE 

EMMA DUNN, 
in John Stokes' Playlet, "THE BABY: Jesse I. Lasky's "THE 
PHOTO SHOP:" GENE GREEN THE MARCEL AND BORIS 
TRIO: BERGERE PLATERS; NEW DAYLIGHT MOTION PIC- 
TURES; WILLA HOLT WAKEFIELD in "SONG READINGS" 
Evening prices. 10c. 25c. 50c. 75c Box seats, $1. Matinee prices 

(except Sundays and holidays), 10c. 25c, 50c Phones I _l.i 7" 

Home C 1670. 



PATRICK*™ 

r Rubber siAMhU. 

Stencils.Seals.Signss,Etc. 



SBO MARKET ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



July 8. 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



IS 



PLAYTHINGS. 

By a flower, a glance, a sigh, 

Hardly won, 
You vow to love me till you die — 

Pouf! Tis done. 

We were only playing then — 

Why not so? 
Who cares about a heart wound when 

It does not show? 

I look another way, and now 

Smile and sigh — 
Listen to another vow, 

And so — pass by! 

Hearts are brittle things, they say, 

Rare and fine — 
But why should I heed theirs, if they 

Heed not mine? 

— Maud A. Black in Smart Set. 



The use of trade union funds for political objects is to 

be legalized by the British parliament, with certain reserva- 
tions. The decision of the court in the Osborne case outlawed 
all such expenditures, and so sweeping a prohibition was a blow 
at the labor party, many of whose members are supported by 
trade union contributions. The bill introduced by the Govern- 
ment, which will probably become a law, provides that a politi- 
cal fund may be maintained separate from other funds, and that 
all appropriations from it for political purposes shall be author- 
ized by a majority of the members voting. Yet members who 
refuse to contribute to the political fund shall be protected 
from coercion or punishment, and shall not be placed at any 
disadvantage compared with other members of the union. These 
provisions in defense cf individual rights seem reasonable, for 
a man should no more be 'coerced into contributing toward the 
support of a political party than he should be assessed for the 
maintenance of a religion that was abhorrent to him. 



Only one Democrat left his party on the wool tariff bill, 

while twenty-four Republicans voted with the Democrats — thus 
sending the bill to the Senate with an overwhelming House 
majority. So is further emphasized a breaking up of the Re- 
publican party over the tariff issue. So many votes from that 
party in the House for the bill indicate the possibility that the 
measure may come to a vote in the Senate and pass that body 
with the help of the Republican progressives. But a veto from 
President Taft would most likely follow on the ground that 
legislation should be based on a report from the tariff board. 
There is practically no possibility that the bill will become a 
law at this session. 



It is admitted on all hands that the reciprocity bill will 

pass the Senate. Nevertheless, it is now the plan to drawl 
the debate along into the middle of July merely to give some 
of the opposition statesmen a chance to define their position. 
This seems to be wholly and wantonly unnecessary. The case 
has been made up and the country is entitled to a vote. Sena- 
tors who oppose do not need until the middle of July or until 
the middle of next week to state the reasons of their opposition. 



Ever notice how the man who is willing to be a scoun- 
drel objects to being called one? What we really want to 
know in San Francisco just now is (1) where is the fair site to 
be; and (2) who will be chief of police month after next? 



The trial of Blackburn, the alleged boodler, resulted in a 

hung jury. Served it right : such a jury ought to be hung. 



PWBI 




"WHERE QUALITY COSTS LITTLE 



OZ1KI AWn C0B WASHINGTON I C0R.MARKE7 

UMKLANU and III- STS I »na rOURTH STS SAN FRANCISCO. 



Sales Important Alike to 

Men and Women 

TAKE PLACE 

Saturday and Monday 



Merchandise of a high order for Men and Women in 
various lines is to be featured at unusually attractive prices. 

Briefly — these are the events to be featured: 

( For further details as to prices, descriptions and values, 

see evening and morning papers, and also our [350 feet of 

show windows on this busy corner.) 

Sale of Men's Suits 

Spring and Summer Weights in Medium Colors. 
About 300 of them which are to be closed out at 
ABOUT HALF PRICE. 

Sale of Men's Soft Stitched Hats 

New models in Scratch Felt, 
usually selling at $3.00 

On Sale at $1.95 

Sale of 1000 New Petticoats 

In Taffeta, Plain Messaline, and Persian 

and Pompadour Messalines. 

Patterns and Colors of Extraordinary Beauty 

At $2.45 and $2.95 

Sale of Women's Tailored Suits 

In new Fall Models and Colors at 

$22.50, $25.00 and $27.50 

Clean-Up of Women's Untrimmed 
Millinery Shapes 



Worth up to $1.50 



At 85c 



Special Tailoring Proposition 

In which Men's Suits are Made-to-Messure 
in Our Own Workroom, in Any Style from 
New Fall Materials 

At $16.75 

Sale of Women's Wash Dresses 

Lawns and Batistes, in Tailored and 
Trimmed Styles. Formerly $5 and $6 

At $2.95 



16 






i^. 



-*sf 




n Cisco lNews 



N« 



Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



Not so many weeks ago, a house guest with whom several 
mosquitoes had been coquetting was quarantined as a victim 
of the measles while the rest of the guests and the host and 
hostess and their children in a panic declared that there were 
potentialities of every phase of the affliction showing in fev- 
ered brow, lacing pulse and parched lips, and the country home 
was ail ready to antiseptic itself into a sanitarium when a phy- 
sician from the city arrived and pronounced the patient a mere 
example of choice pickings for mosquitoes that had gone right 
down the menu on him. 

Since then I have heard a number of tales of house party 
happenings that have likewise enlivened the annals of this sea- 
son's records. This is the week when every country house 
bulges with guests, so it is altogether a fitting time to share 
these disclosures. There was the young man who was a house 
guest at his sister's home in Napa County. He and his brothers 
have soldiered with fortune from Skaguay to Salvador, from 
Nome to New York, and always some member of the family 
has been hereabouts driving dull care away with a natural 
and deliberate incorrigibility. 

Things were not moving at a head-on collision rate of speed 
and the brother of the hostess felt guilty. So he announced 
that he would have to part the week in the middle with a 
hurried trip to town. That very day a jovial married man in 
the party refused to join the others on a picnic drive, with the 
plea that he must stay home and write some business letters. 
Imagine the feelings of the picnickers when a turn in the road 
disclosed the perfidious husband seated in a trap, driving with 
one careless hand, and the other closely and painstakingly em- 
bracing the good-looking woman who snuggled up in defiance 
of the proprieties. 

The host whipped up the horses, hoping that the wife had not 
recognized the affectionate driver of the trap disappearing from 
view at a turn in the road. Of course the wife pretended not 
to have seen her erring spouse, but her gayety was too high- 
pitched and empty, and no one seemed to care much for the 
cold chicken and salad and sandwiches and coffee, and the 
repartee was as flat as the lunch, and the early drive homeward 
unenlivened by song and laughter. 

The perfidious husband, with a here-I've-been-all-the-dreary- 
while expression, met them, fountain pen in hand. What his 
wife said to him while they were dressing for dinner could not 
even be surmised, for he ate his dinner with unimpaired appe- 
tite and was abominably cheerful throughout the embarrassing 
meal. After dinner he thought he'd take a little walk to town, 
and went whistling off. "The brute!" whispered the other 
women, and proceeded to redouble the wife's misery by their 
tender solicitations. Then some one suggested that they all go 
into the village to the moving picture show. There they found 
the brazen husband in the front row with his companion of the 
afternoon. He pretended (the women in the party were par- 
ticularly sure of the pretense) that he did not know they were 
in the back of the house. 

The drive home was a savage attempt at gayety, and the 
supper afterwards was not larded with good humor. In the 
midst of it the husband showed up and nonchalantly remarked 
that he had brought home "a lady friend," whom he called into 
the room and solemnly introduced as Miss Flossie Lark, and 
after a moment of petrified astonishment at his effrontery, 
every one penetrated the disguise and recognized Miss Flossie 
as the brother of the hostess. "We knew you'd follow us to 
the village," the rogues confessed, "and we knew you were 
lonesome for the scandal of San Francisco, so we furnished 
you some." Whereupon "Flossie" untied the laces of her 
"stays," and sat down to satisfy "her" robust appetite, while 
the husband magnificently oardoned his wife for her suspicions 
© © & 

The Country Club dance down at Menlo Park was only the 
prize package in a series of prizes drawn by the guests who 
celebrated the Fourth down the peninsula. There were unin- 
terrupted festivities, and from Los Gatos to Burlingame was 



PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street in the center of the city. 
Take any Market Street Car from the Ferry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The most beautifully situated of any City Hotel 

in the world. 

Take the Sacramento Street Cars from the Ferry 

Two Great Hotels Under the Management of the 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



one amalgamated house-party. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sharon had 
their magnificent new home at Menlo Park filled with guests, 
and every morning their neighboring friends joined them for a 
swim in the commodious pool which is perhaps the most attrac- 
tive feature of this ideal country home. The Sharons, like the 
Newporters, speak of it as a "cottage," though it is more like a 
palace. 

The Fred McNears also have a new home, and though it was 
not conjured up by rubbing Aladdin's lamp like the Sharon 
place, it is a fascinating home with the intimate, delightful 
touches that clever Mrs. McNear knows how to give to her sur- 
roundings. She is accounted one of the most capable young 
matrons in society, and is considered a perfect house manager, 
never overlooking the slightest detail, from bath perfume for 
the guest rooms to extra gasoline in the garage. 

Miss Florence Hopkins entertained Miss Marian Zeile and 
Miss Julia Langhorne over the Independence Day festivities, 
and like all the other hostesses, took her guests to the dance. 
The Clement Tobins had a merry house full, and so did the 
Walter Martins. Mr. and Mrs. Norris Davis and Mr. and Mrs. 
Pierre Moore had guests, as did the Gus Taylors, the Drowns, 
the Worthington Ames, the Will Taylors, the Schwerins, the 
George Camerons, the Mountford Wilsons, and the George 
Howards. 

Over San Rafael way there was likewise an uninterrupted 
chain of house parties extending all the way to Lagunitas. Mr. 
and Mrs. Joe Tobin, who are spending the summer at the de 
Young home near San Rafael, had a big house party, which 
was made up of very intimate friends, so it was just like a 
family party. Mrs. Kruttschnitt, who has just returned from 
thrilling experiences in revolution-ridden Mexico, held the 
center of the stage. She refused to be interviewed by the news- 
papers, saying that her experiences could not possibly interest 
the public, but hers is one of the most thrilling tales that has 
come out of the undisciplined land to the south, and her friends 
are enthusiastic over the cool bravery she displayed in those 
trying times. 

6> © © 

The Will Tevis place at Tahoe was the scene of a house party 
this week which was likewise in the nature of a farewell, for 
Mrs. Tevis and her youngest sons leave shortly for Europe, 
where the "twins," Lansing and Gordon, will take a prelimi- 





OLD 




BUSHMILLS 






IRISH WHISKEY 




1 - ' " "' 


TEN YEARS OLD 




H SVIHLIlflM 

I '*':&-% 

s^H i BM ,, < 
■ aUSHHILlS 


Pure Barley Malt 




The Finest Whiskey Imported 
To The American Market 




B 


ALEX D. SHAW & CO. 

United States Agents 

New York San Francisco Chicago 



July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



nary canter at Continental culture before entering Yale. Pub- 
lic please take notice! Now that the "twins" are ready for col- 
lege, perhaps they will not be referred to as the "Tevis child- 
ren," or as "Mrs. Tevis's little boys." Somehow, neither friends 
nor strangers have ever appreciated that Mrs. Tevis has stopped 
rocking the cradle, and the boys have stopped playing with 
marbles, and have passed the preparatory examinations for 
Yale. 

Miss Lily O'Connor, who is a member of the house party, will 
accompany Mrs. Tevis on this trip abroad. Mrs. Tevis will 
leave her two youngest sons with tutors, and with Miss O'Con- 
nor will spend a summer in leisurely travel, returning here be- 
fore the Christmas holidays. 

? S S 

Tahoe seems tepid this year without the Fred Kohls, who 
always have a houseful of merry guests who can be counted 
upon to add an extra ripple to the gayeties of the lake. Mr. 
Kohl is still at the sanitarium, and his recovery is now a cer- 
tainty. Mrs. Kohl has for some time been a sufferer from ap- 
pendicitis but has resisted all effoits at an operation. Now, how- 
ever, that her husband is in the sanitarium, she decided to like- 
wise take up residence there and part with the troublesome ap- 
pendix. Her rooms are filled with the choicest flowers, and her 
popularity with her friends is attested by the constant stream 
of visitors. 

ffi © & 

It is now definitely decided that Mr. and Mrs. Paul Foster 
(Margaret Calhoun) are to make their home in Cleveland, and 
indeed the last letters contain the news that ground has been 
broken for their new home, which is one of the many gifts the 
Calhouns showered upon their daughter. Mr. Foster, St., was 
very anxious that his son should stay here, and fit himself to 
manage the Foster interests, which are very large, but the 
bride won out in the selection of the home, and Cleveland will 
have the pleasure of closest companionship with this interesting 
young couple. A false rumor to the effect that Mr. Foster, Sr., 
stayed away from the wedding because of his displeasure over 
this choice, was entirely without foundation. Mr. Foster was 
delayed at the last moment by pressing business demands, and 
was deeply disappointed in the turn of affairs which made his 
absence from the wedding imperative. Young Foster has been 
given complete charge of the real estate interests df the Cal- 
houns, and as their realty holdings in the East and South are 
very large, he will have responsible, and needless to say lucra- 
tive, work. Friends here hope io welcome them some time 
during the winter, when they plan a brief visit here. 



PRESIDIO HEIGHTS 

DYEING and CLEANING WORKS 

3828 to 3836 CALIFORNIA STREET 

High Art Cleaners 

HENRY HICKMAN, Proprietor Phone Pacific 1612 



AN IDEAL S 

Throughout the world. Lea & Perrins' Worcestershire is re- 
garded as the most delicious seasoning for meats, soups and 
l ish of all kinds. For three generations it has held its place un- 
rivaled. It stands today the unrivaled table sauce the world 
ever, through the unwritten decree of nations. So staple is 
Lea & Perrins' Sauce, so unvarying in quality, so universally 
used that it is a quick world asset. It is always salable because 
of the absolute fidelity of Lea & Perrins' to quality, adherence 
to a formula tested for three-quarters of a century and a product 
that has never been successfully counterfeited. Its formula 
has defied the researches of chemists the world around because 
the secret of its combination is an unsolved riddle. 

Worcestershire Sauce gives a zest to the food upon which it 
is placed that no other sauce in the world can even resemble in 
the slightesc. No house, where once it is used, ever goes with- 
out it. It is used in the home, the best hotels and restaurants, 
on shipboard and by travelers everywhere. 



An echo is the only thing under heaven that always gets 

in the last word with a woman. 



SWEETS IN THE COUNTRY. 

Geo. Haas & Sons' delicious candies are doubly appreciated in tl un- 

try. Send a box to your friends on their vacation Can ho senl from 
any of Geo. Haas & Sons' four stores: Phelan Building; Fillmore al Ellis; 
V:m Ness at Sutter; and 28 Market street, near Ferry. 



ST. FRANCIS 



UNION 



SQUARE 



ELECTRIC GRILL 

A restful a'mosphere for ladies and 
gentlemen who wish it. No music. 
An artistic setting- for the best 
service that we can give. : : : 
Geary Street entrance. 

Under the management of James Woods 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Sts., San Francisco, California. 
High order hotel. Fine air. elevation, location. Five minutes 
from San Francisco's lively center. Well liked by ladles. 

American Man $3.00 and up per day 

European Plan $150 and up per day 

THOS. H. SHEDDEN. Manager. 



THE LATEST STYLES IN 

Choice Woolens 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO., Merchant Tailors 
108-i 10 Sutler Street French Bank Bid*. 



There is * COLUMBIA Grafonola for $50 



J3 




$ 



W 



Tbe Columbia Grafooola FAVORITE Mahogany or Golden Oik 
E BELIEVE this to be tt.e BEST hornless .nstrument that ca (Mr be made anJ sold tot Fitly Dollars, and we want 
demonstrate this to >>iu In ) ai La! Kearny MS4 «»d sk tor the Talking Machine Department or drop us a postal 



to 



26 OFARRELL STREET 



KOHLER & CHASE 

1015 BROADWAY. OAKLAND 



SAN FRANCISCO 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear In the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 

WEDDINGS. 

HENSEL-SCHAEFFER.— The wedding of Miss Helen Hensel and Jack 
Schaeffer took place on Monday in Calvary Presbyterian Church. 

LYTTON- WHITE. — The marriage of Miss Camille Lytton and Launce S. 
White will take place Wednesday, July 26th, at 5 o'clock at the home 
of the bride in Leavenworth street. 

RODDA-MISTROT. — The wedding of Miss Ethel Rodda and Lewis Mis- 
trot will take place Wednesday at St. Luke's Church in Van Ness 
avenue. 

LUNCHEONS. 

CLUFF. — Miss Florence Cluff was hostess at an informal luncheon at the 

SL Francis recently. 
HARDING. — Mrs. Thomas Edward Harding gave a luncheon recently at 

"the Claremont Country Club in honor of Miss Greet of London. 
HARRISON. — Mrs. Ralph C. Harrison was hostess at a delightful luncheon 

at the Town and Country Club recently in honor of Mrs. Sam Sothern. 
MILLER. — Mrs. H. M. A. Miller entertained at a luncheon recently in 

compliment to Mrs. Horace Hill, who is here from New York. 
MORROW. — Judge and Mrs. W. W. Morrow entertained half a dozen of 

their friends at a luncheon at the St. Francis recently. 
McBEAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Peter McG. McBean entertained at a luncheon 

on Monday in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Horace Hill of New York. 
PHELAN. — Miss Mollie Phelan entertained at an informal luncheon at the 

St. Francis recently. 

TEAS. 
DAY. — Mrs. F. R. Day, w:fe of Captain Day of Fort Mason, gave a tea 

recently. 
SIMPSON. — Miss Amaiia Simpson was hostess to several friends at tea 

at the Palace recently in compliment to Miss Alexandra Hamilton. 
STEIXER. — Mrs. Ray E. Steiner was hostess at a pretty tea at her home 

on Frederick street recently. 

DINNERS. 
KATES. — Mrs. Francis Kates entertained at dinner on Tuesday evening, 

in honor of Captain and Mr?. J. H. Bennett, 
KENNEDY". — Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Kennedy' entertained al dl i at 

the St. Francis recently in honor of Miss Fort and Miss Florenc i >-- 

borne of New Jersey. 
MARTIN. — Mr. and Mrs. Walter Martin celebrated the tenth anniversary 

of their wedding at a dinner at their home in Burlingame recently. 
MILLER. — Mr. and Mrs. Clay Miller gave a large dinner recently at their 

home in Sausalito, in honor of William Bohrman. 
SHARON. — Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sharon gave- a dinner at the Palace 

cently for half a dozen guests. 
WISSER. — Colonel and Mrs. John P. Wisser entertained at an elaborate 

dinner party recently at the Presidio in compliment to General and 

Mrs. Tasker H. Bliss, who will leave shortly for the East. 
YATES. — A stag dinner was given at the Bohemian Club recently In 

honor of Fred Yates, who has returned to San Francisco from 

London. 

HOUSE PARTIES. 
CHASE. — Mr. and Mrs. Horace Blanchard Chase entertained a house 

party at their country home, "Stag's Leap," in Napa County over the 

week-end. 
TjE PUE. — Miss Elva de Pue is entertaining a series of house parties at 

the de Pue ranch in Yolo County. 
HOLM. — Miss Hazel Holm, who is spending the summer in Han Rafael, 

entertained several friends from town at a house party over thi 
JOSSELYN. — Mr. and Mr?. Chorles Josselyn entertained a house party 

over the week-end at their country home at Woodside. 
MANN. — Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Martin Mann entertained a house party 

over the week-end at their bungalow in Marin County in honor of 

Mrs. Bowditch Morton. 
MOORE. — Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Moore entertained a large party of friends 

over the week-end at their beautiful place in Santa Cruz. 
SHAJtON. — Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sharon entertained a large house party 

at Menlo Park over the week-end. 
SMITH. — The Sidney Smith home at San Rafael housed a gay party over 

the week-end. 

RECEPTIONS. 

MERSFELDER, — Miss Genevieve Mersfelder and her fiance, Hugo Fred- 
erick Linz of New York, were the guests of honor at a delightful 
reception given by her uncle, Jules Mersfelder, at his studio recently. 

UPHAM— Isaac Upham was host at an informal reception in the -red 
room of the Bohemian Club recently. 

MOTORING. 
CORYELL.— Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Coryell have returned from a pleasant 

motor trip to Bartlett Springs. 
LANGHORNE.- Mrs. James Potter Langhorne is enjoying a motor trip 

with friends through Southern California. 
McCORMICK. — Mrs. E. O. McCormick, Miss Louise McCormick, Robert 

Hudson and Mr. Henry are enjoying a motor trip to Paso Rubles. 

CARDS. 
BROWN.— Mrs. Guy W. Brown entertained the belles and matrons of 

the Navy at a bridge tea recently In compliment to Mrs. Frank Mc- 

Comas. 
WILSON. — Mrs. Edgar Wilson and Mrs. Effingham Sutton entertained at 

a bridge tea recently in honor of Miss Louise McCormick. 



DANCES. 

WILLIAMS. — Mr. and Mrs. Harry Alston Williams entertained at a dance 
Tuesday evening in honor of their daughters, Muriel, Plorenci and 
Corona, who have just returned from the East. 

ARRIVALS. 
ALTMAYER. — Mrs. Ralph Altmayer, of Jacksonville, Flaw, is visiting her 

mother, Mrs. R. Sternhelm. at the Bellevue Hotel. 
BAIN. — Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Bain, accompanied by Miss Beatrice .Miller 

and Miss Lucy Page-Brown, are here from New York, en route to 

Santa Barbara. 
BOCQUERAZ. — Mr. and Mrs. Bnet|uoraz have arrived home from Europe, 

and will spend tin v. n alndi i Ol the summer in California. 
BOT1 UN. — Mrs. Josephine Bothin and her daughter. Miss Genevieve 

Bothln, have returned from a delightful visit in the Orient, and are 

at their home in San Mateo. 
CAMPBELL. — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Campbell and their daughter, Eliza- 
beth, are here from Chicago, and are visiting Judge and Mrs. J. C. 

Campbell at Palo Alto. 
CHESEBROUGH. — Miss Helen Chesebrough, who has been visiting Mr. 

and Mrs. Thomas Scott Brooke in Portland, has returned to town, 
CROCKER. — Henry Crocker, Jr., has arrived from the East, and will 

spend his vacation in California. 
DRAPER.— Mr. and Mrs. EQben Draper, the Misses Draper and Miss Marie 

Louise Black have returned from the Sbsemite Valley, and are at the 

Fairmont. 
DRISCOLL.— Mrs. J. M. Drlscoll ami Miss Mary Vetdon have returned 

from Santa Barbara, and are a! their home In Broadway. 
FARRELL.— Mrs. James Fain II lias returned lo her home in Broadway. 

after a visit to Coronodo. 
FRIEDLANDER. — Mrs. T. Cary Fried returned from a delight- 

ful Eastern trip. 
HENLEY. — Homer Henley is down from 5a< rami nto for a visit of several 

days with friends here. 
HEWITT. — Mr. and Mrs. Dixwell Hewitt have returned from Alaska, 

where they have been for several months. 

JENNINGS. — Mr. and Mrs Bennen Jennings, .Mis- Catherine and Cole- 
man Jennings, of Washington, l ». C, arrived at Lake Tahoe rei 
and will spend the summer in Santa Bar! 

JUNGEN. — Mrs. Carl Jungen has ai rived from New fork, and is the 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Schwerin at San Mateo, 

'.i.i'k i LLOP. — The Misses Violet, Gladys and Queenle MacKIUop have 
arrived from Seattle, am Mi Ed EMggins. 

MOFF1TT. — Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Moffitt h om Honolulu. 

MORTON. — Mrs. Bow 7 ditch Morton Iris returned from Marin County. 

where she has been the house guest of Mr. ami Mr .Martin 

Mann. 
NEWMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. George H. Newman have returned from Europe 

after being away six months. 
PAYNE. — Mrs. Abney Pajtie, wife of L Payne, has returned from 

Virginia, where she was the guest 
PIERCE. — The Misses Hazel and Fra Pieri returned recently from 

Wellesley. 
PISSIS. — Mr. a'nd Airs. Albert Plssls and their 'laughter, Miss Dorothy 

Pissis, have returned from Europe, and are at the Hotel St. Francis. 
POWERS. — Dr. and Mrs. <;<"iu< ii. rman P been travel- 

ing in the East, have returned, and an it their home in Clay street. 
SMITH. — Sydney Smith and Felix Smith have arrived from school, and 

will spend the summer with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Smith. 

in Berkeley. 
STERN. — Mr. and Mrs. Slgmund Stem have returned from JTosemlte, and 

are at their country home at Fair Oaks 
STEVENSON. — Commander Stevenson Bind Mrs, Stevenson have returned 

from a delightful visit to Yosen ti 
UHLEE. — Mrs. Ella L : hleo has I isit in Santa 

Barbara. 
WATERHOUSE.— Mr. and .Mis. E, w. ,\. Wati I 

Mrs. Carl Plattee, have returned 

two months' tour. 
WILSON. — Mount!'.. id Wilson. Jr.. h.is returned Inn K.istern 

school, ami is visiting his parents in Burllnge 

DEPARTURES. 

BASSEJTT. — Mrs. Prentiss Bassetl has gone to Del Mont, for a short stay. 

BOHRMAN. — William C. Bohrman ins left for Nevada, where he will re- 
main for about a year. 

i :l ITERS.— Henry Butters has left for an extended Australian trip. 

CASEY.— Captain Henry Ca.-ey left reC< ntly for San I HegO, where he 
Will be on duty several weeks. 

karcie. — Mrs, w. E. Dargie, of Oakland, sailed on Wednesday for a 
six months' tour of Japan, 

DENNY.— Miss Esther Denny has joined Colonel and frank Denny and 
Mrs. Denny at Applegate. 

DURKEE.— Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Durkee sailed on Wednesday for Hono- 
lulu, to be absent about six weeks. 

ERWIN.— Captain and Mrs. Isaac Erwln are soon to leave for Toil 
Leavenworth, to the regret of their San Fra nds. 

FEXMMORE.— Arthur Fennimore has h-ft for the Bast, win re he will 
spend a month or more. 

FRANKLIN.— Dr. and Mrs. Walter Scott Franklin hav( left for Tahoe, 
where they will remain for two weeks. 

GERBERDING.— Mrs. Elizabeth l h i herding and Miss Gcrberdlng have 
left for New York via Panama. 

HANFORD.— Mrs. Marguerite llanford win leave Monday for Santa 
Barbara, where she will visit Mrs. E. Walton Ih -: 

JOHNSON. — Mrs. Frank Johnson, ompanled by her b< Dore, 

and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Johnson, Jr., have sailed for Honolulu. 

JONES.— Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Jones and Miss Helen Jones will leave 
shortly for Castle Crag Farm, wl 



July 8, 1911. 



and Caliiornia Advertiser 



19 



where they will remali tnlght. 

[rs. E. J. Mi i 

Bpend .i month at the Potter, 
McNEAR.— J Mrs. ( 

to Lake Tahoe. 
NAYLOR. — Lieu tenant Harold Naylov and Mrs. Naylor ha 

their new station at Honolulu. 
O'CONNl ik.- Miss Lily I n ■ io 

for an extended trip to Europe. 
PIERCE.— Mr. and Mrs. - Plero are planning to leavi roi 

Crag 1 , where they will spend three or four wi 
PISCHEL Dr. and Mrs. E<nsper Pischel arid Miss fnez Plschel have gon 

East for several a 
RICHARDS. -) »r. and Mrs H G. Richards have lefl roi a I pip to \ osemlte 

Vail. 

RIDEOTJT. — Mrs. Norman Rldeoul has left for the Highlands, wher ah< 

will spend the summer. 
SUTRO. — Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Sutro and children have left for Aetna 

Springs. 
STi INKY.— Mrs GailUard StOney and ht-r sisl.-r. Miss Sarah Mrl ><m;il.!, 

have joined the summer colony al Tahoe, 
TEVIS. — Mr. ami Mrs. William S. Tevis have gone to Tahoe foi a brief 
stay, with theii two sons, Lloyd and William Tevis, Jr. 

INTIMATIONS. 

ASHE. — Mr. and Mrs. William Ashe will occupy Hie home of Mr. and Mrs. 

Walter Seymour at Glen Ellen during the summer. 
BALI >WIN. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Baldwin, who arrived recently from 

the Orient, are still at the Fairmont, supervising the completion of 

their home at Woodside. 
BARTON.— Wi Hard Barton spent the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. Fred- 
erick MeNear at their country home at Menlo. 
BATES. — Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bates and their children are at the Penin- 
sula Hotel in San Mateo. 
BASSETT. — Mrs. Prentice Bassett, accompanied by her brother, Fritz von 

Schrader, and the Misses Everett, have left for Hoi Monte. 
BEAVER. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick li. Beaver and the Misses Isabella 

;iml Miriam Beaver win spend the summer at Inverness. 
BOOTH.— Mrs. S". F. Booth, with her son and daughter, are at Tahoe 

Tavern. 
BREWER.— MlSS Marie Brewer is spending the summer in Carmel, as the 

guest of Miss Alyce Warner. 
BUCK BEE. — Mr. and Mrs. Spencei Buckbee and Sar i Buckbee are 

spending- the week at Del Monte. 
BURKE. — Richard Burke, of Dublin, is the guest of his son and daughter- 
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. William Burke, in San Mateo, 
Bl fTLER.— Mrs. M. Butler and ber niece, Miss Belle Butler, have been 

visiting Mrs. E3. Walton Hedges at Santa Barbara, 
CAROLAN. Mi and Mrs. Frank Carolan and Miss Emily Carolan will 

sail shortly from Liverpool for New York. 
CARRIGAN, — Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Carrigan are the guests In San Mateo 

of Mr. and Mrs. Charles de Cazotfa 
CLARK. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles w . Clark are planning a trip i>- Salt 

Lake in their prft ate car. 
clark. — Dr. and Mis. John Rogers Clark are planning to leave shortly 

for Webber Lake. 
CLOVER.— Rear-Admiral Rtchardsou Clover, Mm Clovei and theii daugh 

ters are spending the summer nn the Atlantic Coast 
CLUPF. Miss Florence ''inn has i <i i-ru.-.i in hei home a1 Menl 

spending a Cew days In (own. 
coyle. Mies Marians Coyle, with liei daughtei . th< Miss _ M i 

Angels Coyle, are.at Vpplegate, where thej will remain for ■ 

weeks. 
CROTHERS. -Mr. and Mrs, George Crothera and Mrs. w. n. Mills are 

spending a few weeks a1 Rancho de Montr. 
DBERING.- Mr. and Mrs Frank P. Deerlng in 

iin-' month of July. 
DBTRICK.- Mrs. Ji i ! < trh k bas taki n a i 

Cruz Mountains for UlO summer. 

DE LAVEAGA. — Mr. and .Mrs. s. Vincent de La 

are established In their atti i i Park hoi summer. 

>i . ne de Sabla, Jr., and th< lr d 

Vera de Bablo and Vtl i I ■ ' 

i Ion, 

]■■ \ RRE1 i -' mi. 

at Santa Cruz. 
ki ,i ii 1] i .\i r and Mrs. James I brief visil 

Cruz. 
FOSS.- Benjamin Foss, the Ban by Chapmai 

in a »Ston. 

GLASS FOR] i leutenanl and Mrs William a. Glassford and their little 

daughter will spend i In Vallejo. 

i ;i; \i Willcutl are In Alpine ■ 

will Bpend the coming month. 
< iREi ;<;. -Mr. and Mrs \\ 
with friends in > 
GREENFIELD.- Mrs ik ' :,i ' 

thrist ( >u .n in 1 *Ol ilnnd. 

GREENWA1 i the Fourth ollday at 

MAXM ind Mrs, P Ban will spend the sun 

LOB iUtOS, Wh< 6 they have taken pOSS 
HARRIS iherd Han ■ 

bert B 

IIAU'llCAN HarOgan, the former v 

Thorn] York. 



EMANN. — M 

i 
HOWAB Howard U , Fallen 

Leal i 

JANKE. — Dr. 

tion at Monte Vlata [nn In th< sierra N vada M 

JENNINGS.' Mr, and Mrs. i mlngs, ot Washli fl 

■ . 

i i 

■ 
KEITH. William m. Keith, of Ne^n STorh and Lond ■ I Iting hie 

family In Pacln* Grove, where be will remain foi tin summer. 
KELLOGG.— Mrs, M. B. Kellogg and 

who ha; e recenl 1 1 ret timed from E p . an al I : ' ■■ 

KRUTTSCHNITT. Mrs. Julius R ruttschnltt Is In town visiting al I ■ 

home of her parents, Mr, and Airs. ETrederii b Pli I erJ 
LANGHQRNE.— Miss .Juiii. Langhorm and Miss Marion Zelb are the 

guests of Miss Florence ETopkln al tfenio. 
lane. — Mrs. Franklin K. Lane and children are the I guesl 

Frederick K. Lane at Claremont Court. Berkeley 
martin.— Mrs. Eleanor Martin has returned bo her home In Broadway, 

after an enjoyable visit with the Walter Martins at their Burlingam< 

home. 
iMAKYK— Mr. and Mrs. George T. Maryo have taken a cottage al Alii:. 

mar tor the summer. 
MASTEN. — Mrs. Joseph Manuel Masten, J. Kendall Masten, Miss Eugenie 

Masten and Kathryn Masten are at Del Monte. 
MAXWELL. — Mr. and Mrs. T. V. Maxwell are al r,uns Itoarh. 
MacDONALD. — Mr. and Mrs, Allan Mai Donald and son are the guests or 

Colonel and Mrs. John Kirkpatriek at Pleasanton. 
MCALLISTER.— Mr. and Mrs. Kail McAllister and Miss Ethel McAllister 

are in Boston. 
McCRACKEN. — Miss Isabel McCraeken". daughter of the late commander, 

Alexander McCraeken, U. S. N., is the guest of Lieutenant and Mrs. 

Miles Georgas at Mare Island. 
McLAINE. — Mr. and Mrs. William McLaine are spending their honeyn n 

in Los Angeles. 
McLAREN. — Mr. and Mrs. Norman McLaren will -spend the summer at 

their country home in Lagunitas. 
MIZNER. — Mrs. William Mizner is spending the summer with her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Horace Bin m hard Chase, at "Stag's Leap." 
MOODY. — Mr. and Mrs. Fred Moody and theii sons are al Castle Crag, 
McINTYRE. — Lieutenant Edward Mclntyre, U. S. N., is the guest of Mr. 

and Mrs. Fred Sharon at Menlo Park, 

OLIVER. — Mr. and Mis. I'artlry P. Oliver and their daughters, Miss Nora 

and Miss Katherine, will pass the summer in Los Altos, 
OTIS. — Mrs. Lucy Otis and her sister, Miss Martha Macondray, will leave 

shortly for Santa Barbara. 
PILLSBURY — Mrs. Horace Pillsbury will return from the East t\\<' Brst 

of September, and will spend a month at the Peninsula Hotel in 

San Mateo. 
PIXLEY. — Mr. and Mrs, Frank 1'ixky and lh-:m- ni.-.-r, Miss S.ih^kmi, : t v 

settled at the Victoria Tor the sumrm i 
ROBINSON. — Mrs. Jamea I. Robinson and Miss Elena Robinson bad Mr 

and Mrs. Georgi Cadwaliadei as their house guests over the week-end. 
Seymour.— Mr. and Mrs. Walter Seymour are planning to leave shortly 

for the Blast 
SHERIDAN Bare, Thomas R. Sheridan and hei daughters Grace and 

Minnie, are sel tied tc theii country borne al Coos Bay for the summer. 
SHORB. — Mrs. Donald ; - ■ ; - n an apartment in Green street, 

where she will spnnd the summer. 
smith. — Mrs. ESleanor Hyde-Smith la th ber daughter, Mrs. 

Baldwin Wood, at the Peninsula n< tel in San Mateo, 
SMYTH.— Mrs. Mary Hanson Smyth and Mr. and Mrs. I. K. D. Grubb 

will sum n n i B i 

tip i.m rsox.- Misf Thi i ' ■ pson Is In New York visiting her sis- 

ter, Mrs. Charli s Noi i 
TILLMAN- Miss Agnes Tillman has returned from a visit to Miss Fran t- is 

Martin in F 
r \ s Li 'i: Mrs. William Hinckley 1 a 

Allen Lewis. In 1 
VON SCHRADER.— Colonel and Mrs. Frederick who are 

established at the Presidio, lining Dr. and Mrs. Alleyne 

Schrader. 

KR. — Mr. and Mrs. Talbot Walkei have sailed on tl 
Wilhelm from New Vu k toi i 

. Webster are enjo; 
i stone Park. 
YVILKINS. — Mr. ana Mrs. Frank E. Wllklns, Laurence Van Wyck ' 

Upham ha\ to Clio, Feather 

i Mrs. John C Wilson and family hi 
Cms tor .< few d 
WRIGHT.— Judge and MrP. H. M. Wright are enjoying the gnif 
menl at I'ti Mi 



Petitions are going up to Congress from various parts of 

the country for lower duties on sugar or their abolition alto- 
gether. At the same time the Congressional investigation of 
the sugar trust is bringing out testimony favorable to lower 
duties or no duties at all on raw sugar. Thus the Bailey diver- 
sion of the Democracy to tariff protection for raw materials in 
the guise of a tariff for revenue only is heading toward another 
obstruction. The sugar duties are now on a revenue basis. 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



A M<sx$®E M@<al®m Factory 




The San Francisco News Letter presents as a frontispiece 
this week a picture in four colors of a model and modern fac- 
tory. This picture and descriptive article is produced here be- 
cause we recognize not only the greatness of the achievement, 
but feel that the man who has built it up to its present high 
standard is a worthy example to be followed by others who are 
interested or are conducting manufacturing establishments. Mr. 
David H. Fanning, whose portrait appears above, has, by am- 
bition, honesty and tenacious zeal placed a monument in Wor- 
cester, Mass., that will live in years to come, and be pointed 



out to younger generations as an example of what can be 
accomplished by following in the footsteps of a man who has 
always been fair and honest, and has lived to see his ambitions 
fulfilled. Mr. Fanning is now eighty-one years of age, and has 
been in no other business than the manufacture of corsets for 
fifty years past. 

Beginning with a single helper, in one room, he has built up, 
steadily but surely, without a slip backwards, the greatest and 
most conspicuous business of its kind in the world, with a fac- 
tory employing upwards of fifteen hundred people, the product 
of which goes into every country on the globe where civilized 
women live. 

The factory, which is illustrated on the first page of this 
issue, is one of the industrial show places of America, and re- 
flects the character of its founder, as no detail for the better- 
ment of employees, or the perfection of merchandise produced, 
has been overlooked cr neglected. 

Commencing on a small scale, and by careful business fore- 
sight, strict attention to work and able management, it has now 
developed into one of the most remarkable concerns of its 
kind in the world. 

The factory itself, where these corsets are made — the Royal 
Worcester, Bon Ton and Adjusto — is a model establishment, 
where close attention has been paid not only to the production 
of goods of the highest quality and latest style, but to the 
health, comfort and general welfare of its employees. The 
Royal Worcester Company's wage workers perform their duties 
amid ideal surroundings. No healthier, happier or more intelli- 
gent body of working girls can be found in the world. They 
work in pure air and sunshine, perfect ventilation, clean, sani- 
tary, and, in fact, comparatively elegant workrooms. They have 
the bubbling fountains to drink from, and unequaled locker 
systems, constantly sterilized and cleansed, to hang their cloth- 
ing in. 

Protection against fire is probably more perfect than in any 
other factory, and new safeguards are being constantly added. 

The danger from fire from outside sources is reduced to a 
minimum, through the plant being located directly on streets 
on the northeast and south sides. To the west is a wide lawn, 







July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



21 




which prevents any buildings being built within one hundred 
feet. 

The factory proper is of heavy mill construction. The walls 
are unusually thick, and the floors, which are solid, are in no 
instance less than 5 inches thick, while in one of the lower 
floors this is increased to 7 inches. The floors slant from the 
centre towards the walls, where trenches are located to catch 
and drain any water which might pour down upon them. 

At the west of the main building is the engine room, sepa- 
rated by a heavy brick wall, and directly west of the engine 
room is the boiler and coal room, also separated by heavy walls. 
The floors, walls, stairways, etc., in this section are in every in- 
stance either stone or steel. 

All stairways are so situated as to give easy, quick and natu- 
ral access. The stairways are of iron construction, 10 feet 
wide, with frequent and spacious landings, and run from base- 
ment to roof in brick lowers at each end of the building. 

The management never hesitates, regardless of expense, to 
add any new practical devices which will materially improve 
the system and increase the safeguarding of human lives. 

In the various departments some 40 drinking fountains have 
been established. These are on every floor in the dressing 
rooms, and are as sanitary in construction as it is possible to 
make them. All are nickel plated and the water is forced 
through the pipe at a uniform height, by merely turning a 
handle. This is a vast improvement over the common method 
of forcing the water by means of a foot lever. There is no wet- 
ting of the drinker, and it is the invariable rule of the em- 
ployees that they prefer to drink this way than by the use of 
the cup. The handle arrangement for turning on the water is 
a mechanical device originated at the factory. Superintendent 
Bennett says that he caused notices to be posted in the factory 
as to the doing away of the drinking cup, and that never since 
has he knowledge of an employee who made use of the old 
method, though it was not obligatory at the time to use the 
bubbling fountains. 

The office fountains are of somewhat different construction 
than those in the workroom departments, though the principle 
is practically the same. They are made of marble, with nickel- 
plated pipes, and the water is forced through the drinking pipe 
by pressing a lever with the hand. 

Though the expense of establishing the system has entailed 



a considerable outlay, the management believes that in the 
benefit which will accrue to the employees, the money is well 
spent. 

With a corps of operatives as well cared for and as con- 
tented as those of this progressive company, it is not wonder- 
ful that the corsets it makes are of the highest grade in every 
way. 

The Royal Worcester Company, its plant and products, form 
a monument to the ability and business sagacity of its founder, 
David H. Fanning, and it is a pity that there are not more 
business men of his kind. 



When on an Outing 

All camp cooking is made far 
more appetizing 
and digestible by 
the use of the 
world-famed 




LEA * PERRINS 

SAUCE 

THE ORIGINAL. WORCESTERSHIRE 

Fish, Game, Stews, Gravies 

and all outing dishes are im- 
proved by its use. 

A Wonderful Appetizer. 
John Duncan's Sons, Agents, New York 



J 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



When Muriel Vane boarded the Mosetania her heart was as 
free as the undipped wings of a bird : she was gloriously happy. 

During the afternoon of the first day out she ensconced her- 
self in a deck chair and gave herself over to the idle dreaming 
which mingled itself with the soft swell of the waves and the 
steady throb of the huge engines. 

She must have dozed into at least semi-unconsciousness, for 
she realized, with a sense of expectancy, that the chair next 
to her own had been claimed. From the manner in which his 
legs projected beyond the steamer chair, she judged him to be 
all of six feet in height. 

Muriel began to speculate as to what he looked like. She 
dared not turn and store at him. but her eyes traveled as far 
as they might without apparent curiosity. 

Her rug had been slowly slipping from about her feet. 

"You will have cold feet in another moment." He was out 
of his chair and wrapping her up before she knew it. "Let me 
tuck you up." 

"Thank you," Muriel said, "but you were so comfortable be- 
fore." 

"Never mind that — I'll manage to get comfortable again." 
He drew out his tobacco pouch. "I hope you don't mind my 
smoke — it will blow in your direction." 

"Smoke is one of the most lovable things about men — -I 
think." 

The man paused in the act of lighting his pipe. He turned 
startled eyes on Muriel. She encountered the peculiar, green- 
ish light in his eyes with a quickly indrawn breath, nor could 
she turn her gaze from the fascination of them. His scrutiny 
of her became intensified, and Muriel felt her color rising. 

"A man who doesn't smoke," she insisted, hurriedly, "is like 
a woman who doesn't flirt." 

"O-oh!" Allen Tweedie's eyelids drew together as he used 
the peculiar, scooping syllable which Muriel grew to love. "Then 
— you are a flirt, are you?" 

"I most certainly am." Muriel smiled wickedly. "I simply 
love to flirt. I sometimes think I would flirt with a lion tamer 
should I happen to meet one." 

"And what about a tamer of women?" 

"I have not had the pleasure of meeting one." 

Tweedie's eyebrows went up slightly, then closed again over 
the heightened brilliance of his eyes. Then he said slowly, "If 
I were not practically tied down to single blessedness for the 
next few years I would take great pleasure in giving you that 
experience." 

Muriel laughed mockingly, her eyes bantering and irrespon- 
sible. "I'm so sorry," she said through' her ringing laughter, 
"that you are so comfortably supplied with a reason." 

Allan Tweedie's lips tightened and his eyes narrowed them- 
selves into green points of light. "You are amusing, at least," 
he said, lightly. 

Muriel turned her eyes full upon him. For a second, Allan 
Tweedie glimpsed the thin film of tragedy beneath the surface 
of the girl's mocking spirit. She spoke with an impetuous 
haste, entirely forgetting that the man to whom she spoke was 
an absolute stranger. 

"Your cruelty was rather uncalled for, I think — since we are 
merely shipboard companions where all " 

"I am sorry," he put in quickly, but she interrupted him, 
swiftly. 

"It doesn't in the least matter — I never let these little stabs 
hurt me — I perhaps deserve them. But listen," she unveiled 
her inner thoughts with rapid words: "Light as I may seem to 
you, I would give anything in this world if some man would 
make me love him. I don't mean the common attraction which 
draws a man and a woman together — I've had a surfeit of that." 

"And it has never lasted?" 

"Not once." Muriel paused a long moment, and then turned 
to him. "I have been on the verge of marriage three times, and 
it seemed like an intervention of fate that I should have sung at 
some concert just before taking the step. In each case, the ap- 
plause and the honor of friendships given me so dwarfed the 
love that I was about to accept as life that I could have none 
of it. Man — to me — has never risen to the height of an indi- 
vidual — he is only a part of the universal man." 

"Evidently you have not met the man who could let you have 
both and still stand out as a part of your happiness." 



"There are so few men who really take pleasure in sharing 
the object of their love with the world. And how miserable I 
would be in loving a man who failed to appreciate the infinite 
happiness which my music affords me — and who would degrade 
my music by being jealous of it." 

"Then music means life, happiness, to you?" Allan Tweedie 
turned and held the gaze of her eyes while he waited his an- 
swer. 

"I only know that when I am alone and can sing my favorite 
songs that I long for nothing." Muriel laughed whimsically. 
"At times, I have felt that I would willingly give my voice for 
the power, or rather that some one else might have the power, 
to make me love him. bur," she laughed mockingly, "those 
moments are few and far between. It would probably be irk- 
some to be tied to one man when there are so many handsome 
ones. Why, think of it! I couldn't even flirt with them!" 

"Oh-h — I see!" Tweedie again made use of his expressive 
syllable. Had Muriel at that moment not been engaged in 
wriggling from her steamer chair she might have wondered at 
its significance and at the narrowing of the green light in Allan 
Tweedie's eyes. 

"I promised Mr. Kelly a game of shuffleboard," she informed 
him, "but when I come back — no more seriousness — this has 
been enough for the whole six days." 

"I shall remember." laughed Tweedie, lightly. 

Muriel spent the greater part of the days following with her 
table companion, Jim Kelly. He demanded most of her time. 
He was not a man to inspire her confidence such as Allan 
Tweedie had, but she enjoyed an unemotional comradeship 
with him. 

During moments of the day when she was with Tweedie, a 
sense of security and contentment dawned slowly within her. 
His conversational reserve chilled Muriel to the heart, but on 
the other hand he seemed trying to concentrate every atom of 
his power into the deep glance ot his eyes. In this way much 
was revealed to the girl. By word of mouth Muriel was not 
permitted to enter the inner life. 

Even so, the six days on shipboard taught Muriel that her 
life henceforth would circle around the memory and personality 
of Allan Tweedie. For the moment she was not unhappy. What 
she had longed for had come to her, and she made no attempt 
to ward it off. 

Upon the day of her landing, she said good-bye to Tweedie 



For Centuries 



Known as Chartreuse 
LIQUEUR 

PERES 
CHARTREUX 

-GREEN AND YELLOW— 



THE GRAND 

FINALE TO 

THE WORLDS 

BEST DINNERS 



At flrst-class Wine Merchants, 

Grocers, Hotels, Cafes, 

BUtjer & Co., 

45 Broadway, New York, N. T. 

Sole Agents for United States. 




July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



and Jim Kelly. They were going on to Liverpool, while she 
was leaving the boat at Fishguard. The goodbye was not for 
long. Both men were coming to see her in London. 

Jim Kelly came, but not Allan Tweedie. When the dayt 
wore on and he never so much as wrote a line or in any way 
lived up to the trust she would have credited him with, Muriel 
knew sorrow. He, thu one man she had chosen to believe in, 
had failed her utterly. 

Muriel tried to put him from her thoughts, but he remained a 
living, breathing personality and she despised herself for cher- 
ishing the memory of a man who had crushed out once and for 
all hope that a man might one day give her the greatest gift. 

Four years on the continent gave her a firm footing in the 
musical world. It was then that she crossed back to America 
for a big concert tour. 

One of her first stops was in Toronto. She realized that she 
was near the man who refused to leave her in peace. He was a 
civil engineer, and was even then probably in Sault Ste. Marie. 

Muriel was well through her first operatic aria when her voice 
suddenly wavered and would have broken save for her swift 
control. Allan Tweedie was in the stage box, and leaning far 
over. The green light of his eyes shone full into Muriel's own. 

She answered in the affirmative to the note which he sent 
around to her. He came to her dressing room and she closed 
the door. 

"Tell me first," Allan Tweedie said, trying to steady his 
voice, "whether or not you are the wife of Jim Kelly?" 

"I am nobody's " 

"Then come here, dear," he held out his arms. 

Muriel drew a deep breath as his arms tightened about her. 
"This all seems very natural, Allan — but why have you left me 
so alone?" 

"I have been more or less of a fool. After you left the ship 
at Fishguard, Jim Kelly told me that you were his wife " 

"I?" Muriel drew from Tweedie's arms. 

"Come here — just where you were. Yes; he said that you 
were eloping and that it was a secret." 

"Still — you could have made sure — couldn't you — if you had 
loved me then?" 

"If I had loved you then. I have loved you always — so much 
so that I dared not trust myself to see you if you were his wife. 
After I had lost the opportunity of finding you, I somehow knew 
that it was best. You wanted your music more than any- 
thing " 

"Never more than vou, Allan — if you ever think that, I will 
drop every bit of my music." 

"No, you won't — because then I would have nothing to live 
up. As it is, I will have a constant struggle to hold my own 
against another love." 

"It won't be much of a struggle — you see I have been given 
the greatest gift." — Dorothy Douglas in Boston Globe. 



BANKING 



THE PARTING GIFT. 



Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 





Casta and Sight Bx ■; 10,170 

Kesources 13,71 1,997.72 



.\ it appropriately dec t--< ] Ron \ ■•■■■■■ Bo: filled with candl 

. : i ■ ■ ■ i ■ . ol your besl wishes for a pleasanl jounv 

a- Sons" foui ■ .' M i ■ ■ - Plielan Build 

.-it Ellis; Van Ness al Sutter; and - its '■ I treei 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 
(Member of thi Associated Sa 1 I ; rancisco.) 

Poi the half yes 1 911. :* dividend hai arod at 

te of four (4) per cent per annum on all savin free of 

!■ tyable on and after Sal 
(or are Inclpal and bear I 

July 1, 1911. 

II. C KLEVESAPE 
Office — 783 Marl.: . u- Fourth, San Pranci! 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 
(Member of iks of San Pi 

Fit the half year ending June SO, 1911, dividends ti] 
■ 
ruly l. 1311. 

FRED W. R w. & retary. 
■ 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Bank of Italy. 

■ 

For ui 1911, a divtd< 

the rate "'• 

and after July 1st, 19U 

.Tuly 1, 
est from 

V. PEDRJN1 

Brando 

- 



I. W. Hellman, Jr. 

!\ L. Ivipman . . . . 

K. Wilson . 

Frank B. King . . 



Isaias W. Hellman 
C. de Guigne 
Leon S103S 
Percy T. Morgan 
F, W. Van Sicklen 
[Tartland Law 

Customers of this 
dent banking. New 



Isaias W. Hellman, President. 

-Vice-President W. McGavln Assistant Cashier 

.Vice-President E. L. Jacobs ....Assistant Cashier 

.Vice-President V. H. Rossettl Assistant Cashier 

Cashier C. L. Davis Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 
I. W. Hellman, Jr. 



James L. Flood 
Henry Rosenfeld 
J. Henry Meyei 
Charles J. Deerlng 
James K. Wilson 
F. L. Lipman 
bank are offered every facility consistent with pru 
accounts are invited. SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



William Sproule 
Wm. Haas 
Wm, F. Herrin 
John C. Klrkpatrick 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO 

SIR EDMUND WALKER C. V. O., LL. D., D. C. L. 
President 



ALEXANDER LAIRD 



General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 

Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 8,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are is- 
sued in denominations of 

$10. $20, $50. $100, and $200 

and the exact amount payable in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated on the face of each cheque, while in other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained al 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Miooser 

450 California Street corner Leldesdorff 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings THE GERMAN BANK Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,605,792.68 

Employees' Pension Fund 113,473.47 

Deposits June 30, 191J 44,567,705,83 

47,173,498.51 

Remittances naaj be made bj Draft, Post Office or Express Co.'s Money 
i i] del --. or c bj E2 1 press. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS — President. N. Ohlandt; First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; 

Second Vice-President and Manager. George Tournv; Third Vice-Presi- 
dent, J. W. Van Bergen; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, 
William Herrmann; Secretary, A. H. Muller; Assistant Secretaries, G. 
J. O. Folte and Wm. D. Newhouse; Goodfollow. Eells & Orrick, General 
Attorneys. _ 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. — N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, George Tourny, 
J W. Van Bergen. Tgn. Steinhardt, I. N. Walter, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. 
Kruse and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH— 2572 Mission St., between 21st and 22d streets. 
For receipt and payment of deposits only. C. W. Heyer. Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH — 132 Clement street, between 5th and 
6th avenues. For receipt and payment of deposits only. W. C. Heyer. 
Manager. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

N. W. COR. OF SUTTER AND SANSOME STS. 

Paid Up Capital J4.000.000.00 

Reserve and Undivided Profits 1.700,000.00 

Deposits 23.500,000.00 

Cash and Siglit Exchange 10,300,000.00 

Slg. Greenebaum. President. 

It. Flelshhacker. Vice-Pres. & Mgr. A. Hochstein Asst. Cashier 

Joi Frledlander Vice-President C. R. Parker Asst. Cashier 

C F Hunt Vice-President Wm. H. High Asst. Cashier 

P. \ltschul Cashier H. Choynski Asst. Cashier 

A. L. Langerman Secretary G. R. Burdick Asst. Cashier 

Issues Travellers' Letters of Credit, available In all parts of the world; 
buys and sells Foreign Exchange, and Issues drafts and cable transfers. 
Accounts of Banks, Bankers, Corporations, Firms, and Individuals 
invited. SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 
iThe German Bank.) 
(Member of th. ks of Ban I 

For U ending Jun.- 3". 1911. 

tie rale oi ft r annum on 

.Lie on and after Saturday. July 1. 1911 ailed for are 

added to the deposit account and earn divt MIL 

Office.— S26 California si ' l, . n 1Sr 

trlct Branch — 132 Clem. : ath and btn 

avenues. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 




The New York 
Financial Outiook 



The excellent cotton crop report of 
last week was passed by in the 
same manner as other good news re- 
cently received. The grain condi- 
tions are now receiving the most attention. We believe that 
after we are past this uncertain period, barring developments 
of a more serious nature than have been so far received, good 
opportunities will be presented for making purchases. 

There is quite a short interest in the market, and prices have 
held up fairly veil, considering the professional selling pres- 
sure. At the present time, we advise extreme caution, and 
would not mak; any new commitments until the crop situation 
is in a more settled state. 

Erie's earnings for fiscal year ending June 30th show ap- 
proximately $6,000,000 available for dividends. This is suffi- 
cient to meet 4 per cent dividend on both classes of preferred 
stocks and still leave about 3 per cent outstanding common 
stock. We advise the purchase as heretofore of Erie, believing 
in higher prices later on. — By F. Thieriot, Resident Partner 
Ehrich & Company, 409 Pine street. 



A Union of 
Commercial Bodies. 



Articles of incorporation of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce will be filed with the Sec- 
retary of State in a few days. It is 
under this name that the present Chamber of Commerce, the 
Merchants' Exchange and the Merchants' Association will 
amalgamate into one body, with one set of officers and acting 
as one body to achieve the same results that the three bodies 
have hitherto sought to achieve independently, often with more 
or less confusion. The present hall in the Merchants' Exchange 
building will be used as the meeting place of the new Chamber, 
the Merchants' Exchange having agreed to lease the hall to the 
amalgamated body for 12 years, at a rental beginning at $500 
a month and gradually increasing to $850 in the last year, and 
also to give the new body an option to purchase the properties 
of the Exchange at the price of $1,750,000. 

Permanent organization of the new San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce will shortly be effected, after an election of offi- 
cers. The union of the three present bodies will release some 
of their present salaried employees. Two of the secretaries, 
for instance, will no longer be needed, as there will be but one. 
Whether this new secretary will be T. Cary Friedlander, of the 
Merchants' Exchange; C. W. Burks, of the Chamber of Com- 
merce; or L. M. King, of the Merchants' Association, is not 
yet known. It may not be any of them. 

The California Development Board, into which the Board of 
Trade and the Manufacturers' and Producers' Association were 
recently merged, and the Home Industry League will not enter 
into the coalition, each pursuing its aims along present lines. 

The Home Industry League remains aloof for the alleged 
reason that its purpose is solely the furthering of California 
manufactures and products, while the other organizations in- 
clude in their memberships many individuals and firms inter- 
ested in Eastern industries and therefore liable to come in con- 
flict with the purposes of the Home Industry League. 

"We have resolved not to become a party to the combina- 
tion," said A. C. Rulofson, president of the Home Industry 
League, "because our object is the development of California 
products only, and if we joined with the other organizations, 
there would always be more or less conflict of opinion. Many 
California products are in competition with the same class of 
products manufactured in the East, and the latter have their 
agents in the three other organizations, who would naturally 
seek to push their business at the expense of the home pro- 
ducers. 

"The Home Industry League is applying its efforts solely to 
California interests, and no one interested in competing East- 
ern industries is eligible to membership. Representatives of 
Eastern or foreign industries which have no counterpart on this 
coast, which do not compete with Western industries, may be- 



come members, however, until such industries are established 
here, when they must ce?se to represent the rival Eastern con- 
cerns, or leave the organization." 

It is believed that the new San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce will begin active work as a unit by October 1st of this 
year, by which time, it is expected, the centralization process 
will be completed. 



The Earnings of 
Pacific Railroads. 



According to the Wall Street Jour- 
nal, the Union Pacific, judged by 
ten months, will earn about 17 per 
cent for common stock in the cur- 
rent fiscal year, as against 19.17 per cent last year, and South- 
ern Pacific about 9.2 per cent against 13 per cent. April earn- 
ings of the Harriman line afford basis for mixed emotions, the 
darker shades predominating. Compared with the previous 
year the Union Pacific's gross decrease of $681,729, or 9.1 per 
cent, is but a repetition of the February and March exhibitions. 
Its decrease in April net of $380,960, or 13.7 per cent, is slightly 
greater than the decrease shown in March, although some im- 
provement nas been expected. Unlike Atchison, Union Pacific 
did not succeed in cutting expenses sufficiently to offset the loss 
in gross. Southern Pacific's April gross as compared with last 
year shows the largest decrease of any month in the fiscal year, 
viz., $702,981, or 6.4 per cent. The net falling off was $228,366, 
or 7.1 per cent. Allowing for increased mileage which plays a 
considerable part in Union Pacific's statement by reason of ab- 
sorption of a number of Washington and Oregon branches op- 
erated individually last year, the showing is even less favor- 
able. Gross earnings of Union Pacific for ten months ended 
April 30th last were $74,892,411. Adding $15,000,000, which 
was the gross earned in May and June last year, less $1,000,000 
which is approximately the decrease from last year's showing 
to be expected in the-e on the basis of recent performance, 
gross for the year to end June 30th, would approximate $89,- 
000,000. Net treated ia the same way gives a 12-month figure 
of $36,000,000. There ha? been no development which greatly 
affected fixed charges for the current year. The only consider- 
able change in other income will probably be a decrease of 
$500,000 in the dividend received on Union Pacific Coal Co. 



EHRICH & COMPANY 

409 PINE STREET 

Members New York Stock Exchange 

Foreign Correspondents 

Securities Bought and Sold on Commission 

STOCKS, BONDS, COTTON AND GRAIN 

JULY RE-INVESTMENTS 

FERDINAND THIERIOT, Residem Partner 
Telephones: Sutter 2170 Home C 6630 San Francisco 





BONDS 




Established 1858 




STTTRO A, PO Investment Brokers 


412 


Montgomery Street San Francisco 


Memb 


ers Stock and Bond Exchange Circular on request 



BISHOP & ELY 

630 Security Building Los Angeles, Cal. 



SCIENTIFIC TREE 
SURGERY 



Expert Tree Work by Trained Men 
CALIFORNIA OAKS A SPECIALTY 



Branch Office 



San Mateo, Cal 



Your stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY 
Let us guide you in your selections 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importer! of and Dealers in 
THE HIGHEST CLASS PAPER TOR OFFICE STATIONERY 
Battery and Jackson Sts. San Francisco, Cal 



July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



stock. Last year's receipts included a belated $500,000 de- 
claration for 1909. 

The election of former Governor Gillett to the pre: -.'- 

dency of the Mascot Copper Company, is additional promi- 
of a continuance of the good work that company has been doii . 
in the development of its great properties in Cochise Count 
Arizona. This company will, no doubt, soon be on a dividenu- 
paying basis. 



Former Congressman James Mc- 
California Oil Fields. Lachlan, director, and Charles H. 

Treat, secretary and general mana- 
ger of the Midway View Oil Company, in the Fullerton field, 
report great activity in that region by the Standard Oil Com- 
pany. Two forces of this company are at work in preparation 
for drilling dozens of wells, and in the installation of pipe lines. 
The Union company is also preparing to drill several wells in 
the territory northeast of Fullerton, and the Amalgamated Com- 
pany which brought in the first wells in the proven sections of 
Olinda and Brea canyon is quite active. The Midway View- 
Company owns five acres in the center of the greatest activity 
with a long term lease on eighty acres close to the Amalga- 
mated and Union holdings. 

The Associated Oil Company has finished the 3%-inch pipe 
line from its new well on section 30 in the Elk Hills to section 
26, where the 4Vj-inch line to Midway terminates, and within 
a few days this well on 30, believed to be the best strike yet 
made in that territory, probably will be sufficiently tested to 
prove this hope. 



San Diego's 
World's Fair. 



The ground breaking celebration of 
the Panama-California Exposition 
will take place in San Diego July 19 
to 22, 1911. There will be some 
very elaborate and picturesque ceremonies and historical pa- 
geants, the like of which have never before been seen in 
America. The citizens of San Diego are spending $50,000 for 
features that will go to make up the parades and decorations. 
The theme is taken from the remarkable events of history inci- 
dent to the discovery of the Pacific Ocean, of California, and 
San Diego and the early occupation of the Franciscan fathers, 
who founded the twenty-one picturesque missions that stretch 
from San Diego to Solano. 



Prime Wire -New York. Chicago 



Western Uoion Code 



J. C. WILSON 



New York Stock Exchange 

Chicago Board of Trade 

The Slock and Bond Exchange. S. F. 



Main Olfice 

MILLS BUILDING 

Sao Francisco 

Correspondents 

HARRIS. WINTHROP & CO. 

New York. Chicago, London and Paris 



Branch Offices 

PALACE HOTEL 

(Main Corridor) San Francisco 

HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



— —A few months ago a Methodist preacher delivered a dis- 
course on "Jonah" at La Center, Ky., in which he is reported to 
have said : "When Jonah left that fish he hit the ground a-run- 
ning, and started full tilt for Nineveh. One of the sisters looked 
out of her window and saw a cloud of dust down the road, and 
after looking intently, said to her husband : T believe in my 
soul, yonder comes Brother Jonah.' She went to the door and 
hollered, 'Good mornin.' ' 'Good morning,' answered Jonah, 
without turning his head. 'Where yo' goin' so fast, Brother 
Jonah?' 'Goin' to Nineveh,' he replied. 'Well, stop and take 
dinner with us.' 'Ain't got no time. Three days late now.' 'Oh, 
come in and get your dinner, Brother Jonah ; we've got fish for 
dinner.' 'Don't talk to me about fish,' said Brother Jonah. 'Well, 
come in and have a drink of water.' 'Don't talk to me about 
water' — and on he went a-clipping toward Nineveh." — The 
United Presbyterian. 



A certain young man's friends thought he was dead, but 

he was only in a state of coma. When, in ample time to avoid 
being buried, he showed signs of life, he was asked how it 
seemed to be dead. "Dead?" he exclaimed, "I wasn't dead. I 
knew all that was going on. And I knew I wasn't dead, too, 
because my feet were cold and I was hungry." "But how did 
that fact make vou think you were still alive?" asked one of 
the curious. "Well, this way: I knew that if I were in heaven 
I wouldn't be hungry, and if I was in the other place my feet 
wouldn't be cold." — Exchange. 



Dr. Agnew, 

Francisco. 



rectal diseases exclusively. 821 Market street. San 



( ion 

namj, 




The above illustration shows a portion of Horlick's Malted 
Milk Companv's plant at Racine, Wisconsin. One of the most 
delicious, as well as most healthful beverages is Horlick's 
Malted Milk, which agrees with the weakest digestion and is 
invigorating and nutritious. It combines rich milk with malt 



grain extract in powder. It is delightfully refreshing, and is 
suitable not only to children and invalids, but to the strong 
as well. Families find it a most acceptable feature of their 
provender, and an ever-ready aid in making the table attrac- 
tive. 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



SIERRA BLUE LAKES WATER AND POWER COMPANY. 

The S. F. News Letter has printed several descriptive articles 
on the Sierra Blue Lakes water supply, and to further advance 
our arguments we print herewith three views of the Mokelumne 
river, showing the volume of water now running to waste. Just 
beyond these points the Blue Lakes are situated. (See Page 2.) 




North Fork of the Mokelumne River. 




Railroad Flat Reservoir Dam. 




INDEPENDENT SHOWS IN NEW YORK. 

There seems to be some sort of a mixup over independent 
shows in New York next winter. Recently announcement was 
made that the National Association of Automobile Manufactur- 
ers, of which S. A. Miles is general manager, proposes to hold 
an automobile show in New York next winter for the benefit of 
independent manufacturers who are not members of the re- 
constructed A. L. A. M., and who did not show at Madison 
Square Garden. This statement draws forth a reply from C. 
W. Kelsey, secretary of the Automobile Manufacturers' Asso- 
ciation of America. He says : 

"The Automobile Manufacturers' Association of America has 
already announced their show to be held in the new Grand Cen- 
tral Palace during the week of January 1, 1912, where under 
one roof there will be shown at the same time both the com- 
mercial and passenger vehicles in separate sections, and where 
every manufacturer will have abundant room and equal facili- 
ties for showing his vehicles. This show will be conducted 
entirely by independent manufacturers, who have never been 
affiliated in any way with the Selden Patent Association, now 
known as the Automobile Board of Trade, or with S. A. Miles. 
We hardly think that the independent manufacturers after they 
have looked into this matter will be foolish enough to fall for 
a plan arranged to benefit the A. L. A. M. promoters and for 
the express purpose of sidetracking all others, just as in the 
past." 



"He always was a bad egg, but nobody seemed to notice 

it while he was rich." "Yes, he was all right until he was broke." 

"statement - 

Of the Conditions and Affairs of the PENNSYLVANIA CASUALTY COM- 
PANY, of Scranton, In the State of Pennsylvania, on the 31st day of 
December, A. D. 1910. and for the year ending on that day. 

Published pursuant to the Provisions of Section 611 of the Political Code, 

and compiled from the annual statement filed with the Insurance 

Commissioner of the State of California. 

CAPITAL. 

Amount of Capital Stock paid up in cash 'mo.ii >u 

ASSETS. 

Real estate ov mpany $ 84 

Jx>ans on moi 5.005.00 

Cash market value of ail ■ ■ and bond 

Amount of loans • stocks and <ither 

marketable aJ 16,238.20 

Cash in company's ofliee 

Cash in ban^s : r, I 

Interest due and ■<■ crued 

Agents' Balances representing business written subsequent to 

October 1, 1910 140,391.43 

Total assets $661,166.77 

LIABILITIES. 

Losses in process of adjustment or In suspense $16,799.00 

Expenses of adjustment of losses 1,000.00 

Gross premiums on risks running one year or less, $438..':'' 

re-insurance 50 per cent 219,196.65 

Gross premiums on risks running more than one year, $38,404.00; 

re-insurance pro rata 1 1 

Special reserve for unpaid liability tosses 1 2 

Taxes due or accrued 7,000.00 

Commissions and brokerage due or to become due 40,636.56 

All other liabilities ( 3.161.06 

Total liabilities $425,383.85 

INCOME. 

Net cash actually received for premiums $676,430.65 

Received for I bond and rt| ages 1S3.47 

Received from interest and dividends on bonds, stocks, loans and 

from all other sources 16,510.63 

Received for rents 

Gross profit on same or maturity of ledger assets I 

Policy fees required or represented b ions 9,584.00 

Income from all other sources 203.34 

Total income $706,858.76 

EXPENDITURES. 

Net amount paid for losses $260 

Expenses of adjustment and settlement of claims ;, i 

ITividends to stockholders S. 000.00 

Paid or allowed for commission or brokerage 198,777.84 

Paid for salaries, fees and other charges for officers, clerks, etc. 73.860.71 

Paid for State. National and local taxes i< 

Gross loss on sale or maturity of ledger assets 

Policy fees retained by agents 9,684.00 

All other expenditures 46,784.09 

Total expenditures $666,436.74 

M. G. NICHOLS. Vice-President 
GEO. P. COAR. Secretary. 
E. P. KINGSBURY. Treasurer. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day of February, 1911. 

FRANK R. STOCKER, Notary Public. 



South Fork of Mokelumne River at Silver Valley reservoir, 
flowing 18,000 inches. 



A TREAT THAT CANT BE BEAT 

Gilt Edge Whiskeys 

RYE or BOURBON 

For sale at all first-class Groceries. Saloons and Cafes 

WICHMAN, LUTGEN & CO.. Inc. 

SOLE PROPRIETORS 
431-439 Clay and 428-434 Commercial St., San Francisco 



July 8, 1911. 



and Califov ia Advertiser 



27 




moymu 



The following new automobile licenses were issued for San 
Francisco and vicinity for week ending July 1st: 



liioiciiswoirr. ir. i... San LeanSro Touring 

DROWN, .1. J.. 155 Twelfth Ave., San Mateo Ford 

PRINCE. F. W.. Ill Powell St.. S. F T ,,.,. 

Alexander, o. O., care Pioneei Luto Co.. s. p Lozier 

PAHA I : FINE PAINT CO., 31 Ut St, S. F Ilnilsnn 

CRON, JR., Will., 1401 5th Ave., Oakland s. Duryea 

STEVENSON. D. II., 113 Golden Gate Ave., s. F Sterling 

FT.EIGl'EH. L. AY.. 11th and Mission Sts., s. F Buick 

.lARA'IS, F. P. i:ni Missouri St., S. F Buicl 

LEWIS, T„ 1407 Fifteenth St., S. F i Iverland 

LEVY, HERMAN, 2517 Pacific Ave.. S. E P. Hartford 

VOWINCKEL, DR. F. W., 1200 Octavia si., s. F 1'. Hartford 

KELLY, WM., 2333 Stuarl St.. Berkeley Franklin 

SUGAM, J., 1737 Filbert St.. Oakland Olds 

LOPEZ & REIS. Vallejo Buick 

ROBERTS ENG. CO.. Sheldon Blag., S. F Klin, 

BRAND, ARTHUR, S17 Pacific Bide., S. I' - Regal 

COOK, W. F„ 105 Lundy Lane, S. F Winlon 

BELASOo, FRED, Alcazar Theatre, s. F Thomas 

LOZIER. R. M.. 2135 Sacramento St.. S. F Rausch & Lang 

I.EISNAidOR, GEO., Mills Bldg., S. F Haynes 

PRATT, 11, II.. Golden Gate avenue and Larkin street, S. F P. Hartford 

ILAHN. F. AY.. Ill Tenth Ave., S. F Regal 

McCarthy, e. h.. 109 Front St.. s. F Packard 

THOMPSON BROS., Petaluma Cadillac 

FILL1PP1NI. I'liAS,. Napa Cadillac 

guyliclnetti pros.. Petalums ai i v. 1. 

BART 1 1. G. W., 54 N. 11th St.. San Jose Touring 

KING, .1. C, 678 Harrison St., s. F Chalmers 

HESSE. A. H.. Mt. Eden. Alameda County American Trai 

FADIE, P., Pleasanton Crawford 

garrotti. i-\ Pleasanton Crawford 

LOZrER MOTI IE CO., 165 Golden Gate Lve., s. F Loziei 

GRENNAN, ('HAS.. 388 Georgia, Vallejo Overland 

NELSON, N. It, lintel Shattuck, Berkeley Overland 

RODERQUES, J.', E, Itthand 17th \>. A I . ■ 1 1 . . - , ■ E-M-F. 

STINE & KBNDRICK, 23 Montgomery, S, F E-M-F. 

I)E LA MONTANYA. .1 , 1760 P S. F E-M-F. 

MONTGOMERY, E. A, I DEBENDETT1 i i I 8 

ing, s. F Studebakei 

LINDEMANN, F.. 117: *h St., U -i Garford 

DEMENT, MRS. F. G., .'Tim College Ave., Berkeley E-M-F. 

POSEr] , i !laj St., s i i 

HUNTER, c, H., 1819 Broadway, Oakland Hup 

REQtTA, AI I,.. Crocker Bldg., s F P. Arro« 

siiip.aia.n. C. II-. 1S1 Belvedere, s, F Chalmers 

GROVE O. S.i 911 'i ele rraph Lve., Berk i i 

LENIHAN i: J., 1708 Webster St.. Oakland O 

SIMPSON, id;. \v.. 112 N. 3d St, San Jose Bunset 

THAYER, \ i 112 Isl St., San Rafael Reo 

MILLER, DR. J. J., 91 E St. James, San Jose i 

VESSINi I n i- ■'" I ■ ■ tnd Wet: 

CLARK, vv. D., 8 !la] Bt, s. F 

Phillips, l. a i late Ave., S. F 

MARIANI, D., 1414 5th Ave., S. F 

TAYLOR, mi,.- :i :. 130 Fi II .Oakland Chalmers 

HI ME, i ' B., ii i Htllsld monl 

COHTHRJN, V.. I,.. Ill i I-' .Wlnton 

iiiggins. DR, i: ' land Ave., Oakland B 

ATKINSON. II. .1. 119 Vernon S| , Oakland ,. . 

w iiitm a , \Y. II.. 211 B. 16th s, , B O ikland 

. ■. k'i'on. A C . 1801 Wallel SI S F 

: I i LVe., S. 1 II 

DAHNKEN, F.. v.- Ashburj St., s. F R 

MARSH, O. J II St., s. F 

McKILLOP, a. p., Well F 

MOORE 

ton 
iRBA, Ai. ai . Ban R il i ': 

DAVIDSON, A. w .. Mountain v- « 

IIAOKN \\ 
I.AI1.W 
HICKMAN, i 
McGUIRE, A M 

- 

miller. miss k. ii n. 
i:.n. ii ai 

- 

.t Lang 
AIASKIA. FRANK 



Amid a wave of bunting and fire-work artillery, the National 
car driven by Harvey Herrick Avon the much-heralded Fourth 
of July road race at Bakersfield, before one of the largest 
crowds that ever gathered to witness a motor car event on the 
Pacific Coast. That is, the National won the free-for-all class 
which was reckoned the major event of the day. The Buick 
"30," driven by Louis Nikrent, shared in the honors of the oc- 
casion by winning the 100-mile light car event, however, 
and did so in spite of necessity, several times experienced, of 
stopping for tire change. The Chalmers entry ran a remarkably 
consistent race in the light car division, and took second place, 
while third went to the Ford. In both races, the endurance of 
the various entries played a decidedly more important part 
than did their speed, and the National's victory in particular 
was largely due to its out-lasting its competitors. The car, 
however, demonstrated its speed as well by making the fastest 
lap of the day at a rate a little better than 60 miles an hour. 
The entire ISO miles were covered in 2 hours 58 minutes and 
58 1-5 seconds, or an average of 52 1-3 miles per hour. To one 
unaccustomed to the course this seems slow, but when realized 
that the part of the road over China grade was a veritable hill- 
climb, with turns elbowing at such angles that careful driving 
was absolutely necessary, the time made begins to appeal as 
really remarkable. The road-bed, too, in spite of reported re- 
pairs, was rough, and, together with the necessity of sliding 
around corners, raised havoc with the tires. Interest in the last 
laps of the free-for-all event languished because of earlier ac- 
cidents having put all competitors out of the running except the 
winning National car. This car was particularly fortunate in 
point of mishaps, however, only two stops having been neces- 
sary -during the entire race. The Pope-Hartford, driven by 
Bert Dingley, took second in the free-for-all, and the Mercer 
took third. Because of the severity of the course, more than 
usual credit is due the accessories that helped in winning the 
victories. The National wore Firestone tires, was lubricated 
by Monogram Oil, and equipped with a Splitdorf magneto. It 
is estimated that 20,000 spectators lined the course, a large 
number of whom came from San Francisco and Los Angeles. 



We wish to correct the notice that appeared in the July 1st 
issue as supplied by Mr. Hazlitt L. Pelton to the effect that 
there has been a consolidation of the Stewart & Clark Manu- 
facturing Company and the Stromberg Motor Devices Co.'s 
lines on the Pacific Coast, and that the same had been made 
with the idea of conducting the business more economically. 

The Chansior & Lyon Motor Supply Company will remain 
the exclusive distributors of Stromberg Carburetors on the 
Pacific Coast as heretofore, with Mr. Wm. R. Johnston acting 
as Pacific Coast manager, looking after their interests and aid- 
ing Chansior & Lyon in promoting and selling Stromberg Car- 
buretors. The Stewart & Clark Manufacturing Co.'s business is 
conducted as a separate and distinct organization, and there is 
absolutely no idea of economy as stated. Their policy will be 
even more liberal than heretofore. 

Mr. F. J. Foy, formerly assistant manager of the San Fran- 
cisco branch of Stewart & Clark Manufacturing Co., has been 
appointed manager, the change taking effect at once. 



A new stock of Jericho Horns has just been received by 
Chanslor-Lyon Motor Supply Co. The demand for the popu- 
lar accessory has been exceedingly great on this Coast. 



FOR SALE 

1910, 30-60 H. P., 5 passenger 
Stearns, in absolutely guaranteed 
condition. Owner leaving city. 

A Bargain at $1850.00 

If taken at once 

Thos. M. Hart 307 Golden Gate Ave. 

Tel. Park 2361 



28 



San F 



rancisco 



News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



With the purpose of establishing the Lake Tahoe endurance 
run, which met with such popularity last season, as a permanent 
annual event, the Tahoe Tavern has just offered a handsome 
silver trophy to go to the car making the best score in a similar 
run this year. The course specified is the new State highway 
which crosses the summit via Emigrant Gap to the lake. This 
is practically the same route followed in last October's tour, 
the only change of consequence being that the new Ben AH- 
Auburn Boulevard will be used this year, thus cutting out the 
Roseville road, which proved the most difficult of any in the 
former tour. The new boulevard is reported one of the best 
stretches of road recently constructed in the State. It is pro- 
posed to make the contest feature of the coming tour more 
rigorous than that of last October's event, to which the only 
objection was that no real comparative test was offered. A re- 
arrangement of controls is likewise expected to increase the 
speed schedule so that the killing of time outside of controls 
will be less noticeable this year than last. A private owners' di- 
vision is also proposed, in which the main idea will be that of 
pleasure, and the competitive feature arranged for the dealers 
will be very much modified. All preliminaries will be decided 
upon by a pathfinding committee, which leaves for the Tavern 
on July 23d in two cars furnished by the Howard Automobile 
Company. Representatives of the local press will be included 
on this committee. 

Another feature that promises to add magnitude to the event 
is a proposed hill-climb to be held in conjunction with the 
tour somewhere in the Sierras. This climb will not be obliga- 
tory for all the contesting cars, but will be a special event 
carrying special awards of its own. Those who are acquainted 
with the new State highway declare that there are many 
stretches offering excellent opportunity for a hill-climb. Before 
final decision is made for the climb, however, the pathfinding 
committee will have to be satisfied that the road is both wide 
and straight enough to insure safe competition in a contest 
where speed is necessarily a feature. Should a satisfactory 
course be found for the climb, and little fear is expressed on 
this account, the Tahoe tour will become one of the biggest 
motoring carnivals in the West. It is difficult to think of a hill- 
climb that would make a more emphatic demand for national 
recognition than one held in the Sierras, and especially on a 
course with the historical associations that attach to the new 

State highway. 

* * * 

A representative of the News Letter recently explored a 
transbay automobile touring route which gives promise of be- 
coming one of the most popular half-day drives in the imme- 
diate vicinity of San Francisco. Crossing to Oakland, one takes 
the tunnel road via Claremont, and once through the tunnel, 
continues on the county road to Lafayette. The road from the 
tunnel to Lafayette winds through a beautiful canyon. At 
Lafayette a turn is taken to the right, and the road followed in 
a westerly direction for a short distance, where a turn is made 
to the left. At the intersection with the Haywards road one 
again turns to the right and follows up the canyon and the grade 
at its end to the top of the ridge. Here a new road is found 
that holds down the back of the ridge to an intersection with 
the Moraga road. It is this new road that adds most largely 
to the tour. It overlooks the entire bay region and offers an 
unsurpassable view. It is also in excellent repair. At the in- 
tersection with the Moraga road, turn may be made to the 
right and Oakland reached via 13th avenue. 

* *- * 

The automobile played a part of no small moment in this 
year's celebration of the Fourth. All the local drives were 
well lined with cars on Monday evening, and on Tuesday morn- 
ing before the sun had well started its day's jaunt. The 
machines for most part were carrying parties intent on enjoying 
the holiday outing at some country resort. A celebration that 
attracted a number of these motoring parties was that at 
Paraiso Springs. The day's activities here included swimming 
and boating during the day, and a big ball and fire-works at 
night. Three hundred guests were in attendance, a number of 
whom were brought by an automobile run of thirty machines. 

* * * 

While in the midst of our summer touring, it might be well 
to consider the advisability of an automobile run to Salinas 
during the Fair week there from July 30th to August Sth. The 
festivities, we are assured, will be immense. The merri- 



ment begins on Sunday, when aviation and ballooning will be 
the feature attractions. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday a 
genuine Wild West show, including roping, tying, broncho- 
busting and a full list of rough riding accomplishments, will 
hold the boards. One of the features of this display will be a 
50-mile saddie broncho race with dismounting and saddling 
every mile. Innumerable side shows and similar concessions 
will also be in evidence. Ball games, dances, parade of Hor- 
ribles, and such other occasions as are usually considered a 
part of all festive celebrations will not be overlooked in this. 
The roads between here and Salinas are in condition to invite 
automobile travel, and an organized tour for some date during 
the week might very well be declared in order for San Francisco 

motorists. 

* * * 

Advice for Drivers. 

"The importance of careful driving cannot be over-estimated 
if the life of the car and its tires are considered," says an ex- 
pert of the Michelin Tire Company. 

"The effect of sudden and sharp use of the brake day after 
day is bound to damage the tread of the envelope and strain 
the beads and side walls. The layers of canvas are overtaxed, 
and little by little the threads stretch until they reach the break- 
ing point. Brakes should always be applied gently, and, unless 
it is absolutely necessary to pull up your car within a short dis- 
tance, let the stop be as gradual as possible. 

"Another important point in driving is the proper manipula- 
tion of your clutch. Never make a violent start — slip in the 
clutch quietly and easily, in this way protecting the mechanism 
of your entire car. 

"Sharp corners should always be made carefully, and you 
can regulate your speed to round the turn with little or no use 
of brakes. As a last word, always remember that your tires 
are rubber and canvas and not steel, so, to get the maximum 
service from them, drive thoughtfully. Many useful sugges- 
tions on the care of tires and tubes are found in the instruction 
books published by the Michelin Tire Company, Middletown, 

N. J. Copies will be sent free on request." 

* * * 

Detroit, a laggard in the matter of the aeroplane as a spec- 
tacular amusement feature for the crowds, has taken the lead 
with the aircraft as a purely sporting proposition. Last week 
the first purely sporting aviation meet ever held in this country, 
or in the world for that matter, was staged at the Country Club 
under the auspices of the Aero Club of Michigan, and it not 
only established several records, but aroused an enthusiasm 
which has resulted in the formation of a syndicate within the 
Aero Club which has arranged for the purchase of the big 
Wright biplane used there, and aviation will take its place as 
a popular summer sport In Detroit. 

During the three days of the meet, Frank Coffyn, the Wright 
aviator now in Detroit, made a total of 45 flights and car- 
ried aloft 42 passengers. Not once was there a semblance of 
an accident nor a particle of trouble with the biplane. In fact, 
the machine used showed more stability and acknowledgment 
of mastery than did the automobile seven or eight years ago. 




Motor Cars 

The Thomas B. Jetfery Company of California, 121-123 Valencia Street, San Francisco 



Leo 



t~^ * II * * ut0 T°P S ' Upholstering, Seat Covers, Etc. 

I tIMIQ* Automobile Painting, Varnishing. Black - 
^-* © smithing. Woodworking and Body Making 

REPAIRING IN ALL. ITS BRANCHES 

fIRST CLASS WORK REASONABLE RATES 

Fireproof Buildine 331-3 GROVE STREET near Frinklin St. Sin Francisco 

Phones: Park 1323 Home S 2328 



KEENAN BROTHERS 



MACHINISTS AND 
ENGINEERS 



Automobile Repairing a Specialty 



PHONES: Franklin 6823 
Home J 2012 



350 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
Betweeo Hyde and Larkin Streets 






July 8, 1911. 
/ 



and California Advertiser 



29 




ABSOLUTELY STANDARDIZED 

WHAT IT MEANS WHEN 
YOU BUY AN OVERLAND 

No automobile maker In the world to-day works to closer limits in fineness of fit than does The "Willys-Overland Company. If this ad- 
vertisement will cause you to act — and induce you to make an investigation of the claims we make Yor Overland cars and compare them 
with others, it will have accomplished its mission. Make your comparison thoroughly, part by part. The more thoroughly your investiga- 
tion, the stronger your conviction will be that the Overland is a car standing on the pedestal, so to speak, above all others. 

Compare the motor in an Overland car with the best car you know, selling for three, four or five hundred dollars more. You will find 
a power plant giving greater efficiency, reliability, quietness and flexibility— no matter what another may cost. 

Compare the body of the Overland with others. You will find them built better, finished better, upholstered letter, and of excellent design. 

Compare the springs, the riding qualities, the speed, the hill-climbing ability, the wheel base, the frame, transmission, brakes, rear system, 
size of wheels and axles, steering gear. Ail these points will stand the minutest comparison with any automobile of the same price, and 
prices far exceeding for what the Overland is selling for. 

Unlimited facilities, enormous production of exact standardized duplicates an Ideal organization built up, controlled and directed by one 
man — John N. Willys — enables us to make a minimum price on the maximum of motor car efficiency. 

THE WILLYS-OVERLAND COMPANY, Toledo, Ohio 



J. W. LEAVITT & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS 

PORTLAND 



SEATTLE 




OVERLAND MODEL 52 

WITH FORE. DOORS 



Wheelbase 

118 inches 
5 - Passenger 

40 H. P. 

4-Cylinder 

motor 

Tires 34 x 4 

Price $1600 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



FUHH 

TIRES 

5,000 MILES 

There is one big feature about AJAX 
TIRES that make them different from 
every other tire: the service they 
render under all conditions. 

Not only are AJAX TIRES as strong 
and well made as any en the market 
and sold at no higher price — but they 
positively give 30 <$, more service. 

The user of AJAX TIRES is assured 
of long tire mileage, and absence from 
tire troubles — the kind of service 
every motorist wants and which AJAX 
TIRES are guaranteed to give. 

Hughson & Merton 

PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS 

544 VAN NESS AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO 

Los Angeles Portland Seattle 




#T>L,VA\BV»S 

THE 
CAR SUPREME 



EXPERT AND EXCLUSIVE Ei ECTRIC GARAGING. 

1554-1556 VAN NESS AVENUE 



SPARKING BATTERIES 

Loaned. Charged and 

Overhauled. Expert 

Spark Coil and Magneto 

Repairing. 

Phone Franklin 1275 

San Francisco 



Guarantee Battery Co. 


630 Van Ness Ave. 


16 2 5 Pacific Ave. 


Phone Franklin 2772 

"Elt&e" BATTERIES 

Batteries Charged and 

Overhauled 

Automobile Wiring 

Electric Accessories 


PHONES: 
Franklin 1510 C 4760 

High Grade 

ELECTRIC 
VEHICLE 
GARAGE 


Electrobola Head and 

Side-Lights 

Coil Repairing 


Expert Exclusive 

Electrical Vehicle Charging 

and Repairing 



Firestone 

TIRES AND DEMOUNTABLE RIMS 

THE FIRESTONE TIRE AND RUBBER CO. 
Cor, Van Ness and Fulton San Francisco 



FOR SALE. — Autocar Runabout, with top. lamps and generator, in good 
ondition. Price, $150. Apply 21 Sutter street. 



The Lozier Motor Company has announced that Lozier cars 
will, in the future, take no part in races or contests on dirt 
tracks or horse tracks of any character unless they have been 
re-built and re-modeled for the express purpose of automobile 
racing, and shall have received the approval of the proper 
A. A. A. committee. The fatal accident to Basle at the Haw- 
thorne track in Chicago recently, and the accident to Strang 
in the Wisconsin races, adds but additional instances to prove 
that racing or. these tracks is dangerous, and entails a useless 
sacrifice of human lives. It gives one more opportunity to sen- 
sation-mongers to decry all form of automobile racing as dan- 
gerous, when as a matter of fact racing on automobile speed- 
ways and properiy guarded roads can be made as safe as any 
other sport or form of athletic contest in which it is generally 
admitted a certain element of risk or danger exists. 

That grave danger attends automobile racing on horse tracks 
or unsuitable road courses has been demonstrated so clearly 
there can be no excuse for encouraging contests of this kind in 
the future.. This does not mean that horse tracks cannot be 
made safe, but the dirt surface should be replaced by cement, 
wood or brick; the high death-dealing fences should be re- 
placed by low, stout guard rails on the outer edge of the track, 
and the inner side of the track should be made smooth and hard 
so that the cars leaving the track on the inside could continue 
on indefinitely, rather than become mired in soft dirt or sand, 
or strike open ditches or other obstructions which result in the 
overturning of a car. A study ot the accidents in automobile 
racing in the past four or five years proves that a great major- 
ity of fatalities could have been avoided by precautions of this 
kind. 

It is useless to contend rhat there is no danger attendant upon 
driving automobiles at high speed, but it is a phase of human 
nature to brave danger and to take chances, and the chances on 
an automobile speedway are much less than the chances which 
thousands of motorists take every day in driving their automo- 
biles along the country roads of America. 

* * ¥ 

The Peerless Motor Car Company has introduced two new 
1912 models. One is rated at 48 h. p., the other at 38 h. p. A 
few modifications have been made in the large six-cylinder, 
and two four-cylinder chasses, that have been continued from 
last year. The bodies are of a new fore-door design, and offer 
a wide range of selection in carrying capacities, in both open 
and enclosed styles. There is plenty of room for the driver 
and occupants. The front doors open backward and may be 
removed or hooked ajar for comfort in hot weather. The lines 
are simple, and the even surfaces lend themselves admirably to 
fine painting effects. 

The new Dynamo Electric Lighting System is standard in the 
1912 equipment. It consists of the dynamo driven by the mo- 
tor, a storage battery upon which the load of the lamps is 
thrown when the car is at rest or moving under twelve miles an 
hour, and five black-enamel lamps with true parabilic reflec- 
tors. A simple switch on the dash controls the whole system. 

* * * 

Californians, who never overlook a chance to prove their 
claim that they do things with more red-blooded energy than 
does the effete East, have just hit upon another pleasure idea 
which bids fair to become popular the country over. The new 
plan is for owners of cars of a certain manufacture to have a 
day's tour and a picnic all to themselves, and the results are 
very gratifying. 

The largest of these so far was held on a recent Sunday when 
a "Mitchell Picnic" was inaugurated by Mitchell car owners 
living in the vicinity of Sacramento. Headed by W. I. Elliott, 
manager of the local agency, forty-one Mitchell cars left the 
rendezvous in front of Hotel Sacramento early in the morning 
and headed for the Woodbridge picnic grounds over 30 miles 
away. They reached this objective point without a single mis- 
hap, and there they were joined by cars from Stockton and 
other neighboring towns, bringing the total number of auto- 
mobiles up to well over half a hundred, the average number of 
occupants in each car being four. 

* * * 

For Sate.— 1910 Winton Automobile. Perfect condition; 

fully equipped. Warner Speedometer; top; glass front; clock; 
tire irons ; trunk rack ; Prest-o-Lite tank ; electric and oil lamps ; 
two horns — bulb and electric; two tire covers; two extra tires; 
two extra tubes. Address, Owner, 21 Sutter Street. 'Phone 
Kearny 3594. 



July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supph 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide' 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 
SAN MATEO.— San Mateo Garage (fire proof), 350 B street. 'Fhom 
Mateo 404. Morton & Beer, Props. Open day and night. Expert automo- 
bile repairing, supplies, battery charging, high-grade gasoline and oils. 
iSlectrk- vehicle charging. 

NORTH OF BELMONT.— Cypress Lodge. First-class mixed drinks 
Bring your lunch baskets and enjoy our little forest. Special attention to 
motor parties. CHAS. P. HOWKE, Pi op. 

REDWOOD CITY.— REDWOOD CITY GARAGE, 701 Mound St. Miller 
Paulsen, Prop. V*ui< ■ gasoline an.) oils. Complete machim Bhop 

Repairs and all work guaranteed. Tel. Black 298. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SANTA CLARA.— SANTA CLARA GARAGE C. F. Fait; E. C. Molitor. 
Home of the Marion. Autos for hire. Gasoline and oil, and all kinds of 
sundries and repairs. Phone: S. C. 93. 1040-51 Washington St. Santa 
Clara, Cal. Always ready. 

SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
"We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE.— Lantolle Grill, 3C-3S North First street The best French 
dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

SAN JOSE.— "WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE, Market and St. Jamea 
street. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler. Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. (See under Stockton.) 

GILROY. — Central Hotel, A. C. Richardson, Prop. Headquarters for au- 
tomobilists. Bar in connection. Newly furnished throughout. Telephone 
Main 861. 

GILROY.— FOWLER'S GARAGES (one on North Main street; the other 
near S. P. Depot.) Phones Main 463 and Main 1003. Rent cars at all hours. 
Tires and Sundries in stock; gasoline, oil, repairing, lathe work, vul- 
canizing. Open day and night. 

SANTA CRUZ.— Bulls Fire-proof Garage. 269 Pacific avenue. 5 and 7 
passenger autos for hire. Auto sundries and repairing. Phone 269. 

MONTEREY COUNTY. 
SALINAS.— COOPER'S GARAGE. Phillips & Rossi, Props. Phone Main 
56. No. 320 Main street. Open day and night. Expert repairing. Supplies. 
Gasoline and oils. Two rent cars. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

PASO ROBLES.— Pioneer Garage, fireproof, w. C. Henderson, prop.: 
agents for Buick and Maxwell. Five and seven -passenger cars for bin 
Expert repairing, Open day and night, High-grade gasoline an <\ oils 

SAN LUIS OBISPO.— CALIFORNIA GARAGE. A. Lucheraa, Proprie- 
tor. Dealer in Automobiles and Bicycles Repairs and supplies. Evei 
thing complete, Building fire-Droof, 879-881 Higuera St., San Luis 
i rbispo, Csl. Phone 789 i:. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 
SANTA MARIA.— SANTA MARIA GARAGE, W, L Donnelly. Prop. 
Phones, Main 1881; Home 41. General automobili Lsollne, oil, 

sundries, tir.'s, etc. All work guaranteed. Night phono Sunset Main 340. 

LOS OLIVOS.— MATTEI'S TAVERN. I'Vlix Mattel, Prop. Finest hunt- 
ing nnd fishing in season. Headquarters for sportsmen and automobile 
parlies. Mountain trout Berved at meals during season. 

SANTA BARBARA.— MISSION GARAGE, 12^1-23 State St.. near Arling- 
ton Hotel. E. <:. Hayward, Prop. The finest fl n Southern 
California. Automobile supplies, repaii ahop Open ii and night. 
Phones, Home 224S; Pacific I 9 I . Renl and tourli 

VENTURA.— MERCER'S GARAGE (fire proof.) W. E. Mercer. Prop. 

Open -ia v ami night. Phones Main it and 1 1 ~ Expert repairing, oils, 

gasoline and sundries, Rent and to i 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL.— WHITE ' th and 

Olive streets. Phones Main 8133; Home L0379, First-da i for 

the care and maintenance of automobiles I night. Bxperi- 

i need employ ees, Pits, \\ orkbenches, efc 
line and suppllei 

PASADENA. — Dun Lee Cadillac Oarage, 17.000 square feet of floor 
space, een trail y located, 151 E. Union St.. absolutely ftrerroof. S 
lockers for lap-robes and tools, etc. Service at all hours, day or night. 
Write for descrlpt ( ve booklet L. G. PATEE. Manager. 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 
STOCKTON.— WALLACE Bros.' GARAGE. 30 S. Sutter Street Most 
convenient location. Beat ot service. l„, sundries. Rambler 

Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. Phone Main 287. (See San Jose.) 



SONOMA COUNTY. 
PETALUMA. PETALUMA GARAGE, Proprietors 

General Suppl 

pairing and auto livery; lubi l< ating oil - and ■. i ol i 

comi latlons for ladles. Corner Third and C 

• !allfornla, 

SANTA ROSA.— Hours AUTO CO., Mendocino Avenue, one-half block 
norl h i-f i !ourl 1 1'- use RJxpei i a ii tomobllt ■ ■ 

isoline. Opi n day I night. Telephone 527 

3toi Maui- Dayton, k Issel -Kar. 

LAKE COUNTY. 
LAKEPORT.— LAKEVtEW HOTEL, I. ■aim- ,,,,! besl ap 

in town. Headquarters for automobile touring parties ami , , 

men. Phone Main 1. Geo. Beebe. Prop,; Lakeport, Cal. See him— tha 

LAKEPORT.— LAKEPORT GARAGE. Vulcanizing, batteries charged, 
gasoline and lubricants. First-class machine work. One block from 
PostofUce. F. E. Watkins, Prop. Phone Main 521. 



FISK 

TIRES 



"THE STANDARD 

OF QJJALITY" 

Made to fit 
all Style rims 

For Sale by All Dealers 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft, and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States. Canada, and Europe 

AETNA INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD 

PACIFIC BRANCH-S14 California Street, San Francisco 



LOUIS DISBROW USED 

MONOGRAM OIL 

when he made his world's records at the 
recent Pablo Beach Races in Florida with his 

Pope-Hartford Car 

This adds another to MONOGRAM'S long list of achievements 
MAKE THE EXPERTS' CHOICE YOUR CHOICE 



SIMPLEX MOTOR CARS 

SIMPLEX PACIFIC COAST AGENCY 

J. N. BURGE. Manager 

124-126 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 



"Do you use condensed milk at your house?" "I guess 

so. We order a quart a day, and the milkman squeezes it into 
a can that holds about a pint." — Toledo Bladr. 



Champion Wind Shield Manufacturing Company 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

manufacturers op GLASS FRONTS FOR AUTOMOBILES 

QUALITY STRENGTH SIMPLICITY 

Absolutely Guaranteed 



Portland 



Spokane 



San Francisco Los Angeles Fresno Seattle 

Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co., Inc. 

AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES Pacific Coast Agents HARTFORD TIRES 

501-509 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



Notes from Del Monte. 

E. M. Greenway is at # Del Monte encouraging his golfing 
friends during the tournament. 

The usual number of motor parties are stopping at Del 
Monte, among them being Mrs. W. S. Hook, Jr., Mr. J. M. El- 
liott and sister, Miss Alice, Miss Caroline Trask and Mr. J. C. 
Macfarland, who are making quite a trip through this section 
of the State. 

Mr. Charles A. Stewart, with Mrs. Prentiss Bassett of An- 
napolis, Miss Margaret Everett and Mr. F. W. von Schrader of 
San Francisco, motored down, with the golf tournament as a 
drawing card, and now they are busy on the links. 

E. J. Tobin, of San Mateo, is spending a few days at Del 
Monte, chatting with his many friends, and watching the pro- 
gress of the players on the links. 

Mrs. E. O. McCormick, Miss McCormick, with Mr. Hender- 
son and a Mr. Henry of England, who are motoring from San 
Francisco to Paso Robles. stopped over for a few days' visit 
at Del Monte and to motor over the scenic boulevards. 

Among those who are visiting at Rancho del Monte, fishing 
and drivine, are Mr. and Mrs. George E. Crothers and Mrs. W. 
H. Mills. 

Dr. Hartiand Law, Mrs. Law and Mr. Herbert Law are 
spending the week of the Fourth at Del Monte. 

Judge and Mrs. H. M. Wright of Berkeley came down to 
spend a few daj's during the tournament. Mrs. Wright is en- 
thusiastic as well as skillful, and finds the links in perfect 
condition. 

* * * 

The Pacific Motor Car Company has just delivered to Mr. A. 
J. Raisch another Stevens-Duryea six-cylinder touring car. 

Mr. W. P. Heilbron, an enthusiastic Stevens-Duryea owner, 
who arrived about four months ago from Honolulu and 
brought with him his Stevens-Duryea, has done a great deal of 
touring while here. He expresses himself as delighted with 
California touring, and the ever-changing scenery; the good 
roads are a constant delight, and the comfort of travel afforded 
by any Stevens-Duryea is absolutely perfect. He is to re- 
turn in a few days to the Islands, and his Stevens-Duryea ac- 
companies him. 

The Pacific Motor Car Company has just delivered a Cole 
"30" to Mr. J. A. Schwabacher, who left immediately for Santa 
Cruz. 

Mr. K. E. Stevenson has just taken delivery of a Cole "30" 
roadster. Mr. Stevenson expects to do a great deal of touring 
in his Cole "30" during the season. 

Stevens-Duryea service to all Stevens-Duryea owners is a 
point that is now being taken up and carefully looked into by 
the Pacific Motor Car Company, who aim to make every Stev- 
ens-Duryea owner an enthusiastic, satisfied one. Mr. H. J. 
Carton, traveling technical representative of the Stevens-Dur- 
yea Company, with headquarters at San Francisco, has just 
returned from a long trip visiting owners and looking after their 
cars and rendering technical advice and service. 



Vulcanizing 



PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phon« Markat 6*70. 



Frederick L. Wilke, a Cleveland man, has joined the Adver- 
tising Department of the F. B. Stearns Company of Cleveland, 
as assistant to Advertising Manager Hower. 




THE 

BEST OIL 

for 
MOTOR CARS and 
MOTOR BOATS 
of any make. 

Next to your choice of the automobile or power 
boat you want, the choice of a lubricant is the most 
important thing. Poor lubricants will ruin the 
best motor in the world. 

Polarine gives that complete lubrication that gets 
every ounce of power out of a gas engine, with les- 
sened friction and wear. 

It burns cleanly and deposits 
no carbon. 

It keeps its body and feeds uni. 
formly under all running conditions 

Send for the Polarine booklet 
to the nearest agency of the 



Standard Oil Company 

(Incorporated) 




42 Van Neit Avenue 



San Franclaco, Cal. 



Fresh Victory for 

SPLITDORF 

AT GUTTENBERG, JUNE 17, 

6 miles. Class E. 231 cubic inches, won by Burke in 
a SPLITDORF equipped E-M-F. Time, 6.09 

10 miles. Class E, 450 cubic inches, won by Koep- 
man in a SPLITDORF equipped National. Time 10.42 

lO miles. Class E. 600 cubic inches, won by Whalen 
in a SPLITDORF equipped National. Time. 10.30 

Again the Efficiency of SPLITDORF Ignition Is proved 
Why not have the same on Your car ? 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH 

520 VAN NESS AVE. 
San Francisco 



RENAULT "The Car" Guaranteed For Life 






Closed Cars 


Touring or Runabouts 




complete 


complete 


Voiturette 




$1750 


9 H. P. 


$3000 


2500 


10 H. P. 4 cyl. 


3500 


3000 


12-16 H. P. 


4000 


3200 


14-20 H. P. 


5500 


4500 


18-24 H. P. 6 cyl. 


"Little Six" 6250 


5250 


20-30 H. P. 4 cyl. 


6500 


5500 


25-35 H. P. 4 cyl. 


6800 


5800 


35-45 H. P. 4 cyl. 


7500 


6500 



S0-60 H. P. 6 cyl. "Big Six" 
ALL CARS BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR AMERICAN ROADS. 



RENAULT FRERES SELLING BRANCH INC. 



116-120 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



Telephone, Market 7038 



July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



33 




From a Gravestone. — I expected it, but I didn't expect it 

quite so soon. — Life. 

Suitor — If you refuse me I shall never love another. 

Suited — Does that hold good if I accept you? — Chicago News. 

"I hear your rich old uncle is dead." "Yes, he is." 

"What did he leave?" "A widow we'd never heard of." — 
Washington Star. 

Crawford — We are threatened with a water famine. 

Crabshaw — Why don't they get the Weather Bureau to predict 
fair and clear? — Judge. 

O'Hara once saw an advertisement in a street car read- 
ing: "Buy your stove at O'Brien's and save half your coal." 
"Begorra," he said, "I'll buy two stoves and save all me coal." 
— Town and Country. 

Atlas was bearing the world on his shoulders. "It is 

easier to have everything my wife wants me to get on one spot," 
he explained. Thus we see it was a labor-saving device. — New 
York Sun. 

■ — — Freshby — Professor, is it ever possible to take the 
greater from the less?' Professor — There is a pretty close ap- 
proach to it when the conceit is taken out of a freshman. — 
Brooklyn Life. 

"And you really think, doctor," asked the wife, "that you 

must perform the operation to-day?" "Yes, positively," an- 
swered the doctor. "You see there might be no necessity to do 
it to-morrow." — Ex. 

"You think your daughter's music 

is improving?" "Yes," replied Mr. Cum- 
rox. "She used to practice four hours a 
day. Now she practices only three." — 
Washington Star. 

Mr. Henpeck — Are you the man 

who gave my wife a lot of impudence? 
Mr. Scrapper — I reckon I am. Mr. Hen- 
peck — Shake! You're a hero. — Path- 
finder. 

He — So young March and his 

father are carrying on the business? She 
— Yes; the old man runs the business 
while young March does the carrying on. 
— New York Globe. 

"What did your wife say when 

you got home the other night?" "Not a 
word. She just sat down at the piano and 
played 'Tell Me the Old, Old Story.' "— 
— New York Evening Mail. 

Positive Wife — John, why do you 

talk in your sleep? Have you any idea? 
Negative Husband — So as not to forget 
how, I suppose. It's the only chance I 
get!— Puck. 

"What's your husband so angry 

about?" "He's been out of work six 
weeks." "I should think that would suit 
him first rate." "That's it! He's just got 
a job." — Megendorfer Blactter. 

Briggs — I have made a will leav- 
ing my brain to the hospital, and just got 
an acknowledgment from the authorities. 
Lofty — Were they pleased? Briggs — 
They wrote that every little helps. — 
American Family Journal. 

The owner of a large library sol- 
emnly warned a friend against the prac- 
tice of lending books. To punctuate his 
advice he showed his friend the well- 
stocked shelves. "There!" said he. "Every 
one of those books was lent me." — Lip- 
pincott's. 



Citizens' Alliance of San Francisco 

OPEN SHOP 

"The policy of limiting the number of. apprentices Dies 
in the race ol the Vmerlcan doctrine that education Bhould 

i ii to a] soi KiiiM i, i [arvard i into 

CITIZENS' ALLIANCE OFFICES: 
Merchants' Exchange Building San Francisco 
Free Employment Bureau: 700 Broadway, Oakland, Cal 



A small Scottish boy was summoned to give evidence 

against his father, who was accused of making disturbances on 
the street. Said the magistrate to him: "Come, my wee mon, 
speak the truth and let us know all ye ken about this affair." 
"Weel, sir," said the lad, "d'ye ken Inverness street?" "I do, 
laddie," replied his worship. "Weel, ye gang along it, and turn 

into the square, and cross the square " "Yes, yes, 1 ' said 

the judge, encouragingly. "An' when ye gang across the square 
ye turn to the right, and up into High street, an' keep on up High 
street till ye come to a pump." "Quite right, my lad; proceed," 
said his worship. "I know the old pump well." "Weel," said 
the boy, with the most infantile simplicity, "ye may gang an' 
pump it, for ye'll no pump me." — Ideas. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 




The Doctor and 

the Telephone 

MANY lives are saved each year because 
the doctor is reached promptly by the 
Bell Telephone. From the information he 
receives by telephone he can give directions 
for emergency measures, and provide him- 
self with the necessary medicines and in- 
struments. 

Consultations with Specialists are easily arranged 
by means of the Bell Long Distance Service. 

The Pacific Telephone 
and Telegraph Co. 




34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



THE HAMLIN SCHOOL 

A HIGH CLASS BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

Comprising a French School for Little Children, Primary, Inter- 
mediate, High School and Post Graduate I (epartments, Household 
Economics, Drawing, Painting and Elocution. 

Accredited by University of California, by Leland Stanford Junior 
University and by Eastern Colleges. 

Courses in Singing 1 , Instrumental Music (piano, violin, organ, harp, 
flute, etc.). Theory and Composition, Harmony. Sight Reading*, Musi- 
cal Dictation. Choral ami Orchestral Practice, etc. 

School re-opens Monday, August 7th. 



MISS SARAH D. HAMLIN, A. M., 



2230 Pacific Avenue, San Francisco. 



Phone West 546. 



MANZAN1TA HALL 

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA. 
A heal thf 1,1 home school for boys — thorough, efficient, growing, 
progressive. Location adjacent to Stanford University makes pos- 
sible a school life of unusual advantages and privileges. First 
Semester opens August 29, 1911. 
For catalogue and specific information, address 

W. A. SHEDD, Head Mastery 



A. W. BeSt 



Alice Beift 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1628 Bush Street 



Life Cla 

Day and Niirht 



Illustrating 
Sketching 
Paintinsr 



Miss Harker's School 



PALO ALTO 

CALIFORNIA 



Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year begins August 15th. 
Catalogue upon application. 



INSTITUT BERTHELOT 

Ideally situated at 34 Rue Ribera, Paris. Mme. Leon Berthelot, 
Principal. Exceptional advantages for American girls desiring to 
complete their education in France. Superior facilities for thorough 
instruction in 

LANGUAGES, ART AND MUSIC. 
Beautiful surroundings, perfect equipment. For catalogue and ref- 
erences, address School Department, Literary Digest, also 

MR. THOS. WHITTAKER, Bible House, New York City. 



The Von Meyerinck School of Music 

Will be open during the Summer for Special Teachers' Courses for the study of 
the German Lied and French Repertoire 
COMPLETE VOCAL EDUCATION. 
Sight reading, musical history, dramatic action, piano, classes In 
German, French and Italian. Specially coached accompanists. STU- 
DIO RECITALS. 818 Grove St. Phones Market 1069; S. 1069. 



BOONE'S UNIVERSITY SCHOOL 

FOR BOYS BERKELEY 

Begins its thirtieth year August 9th. Accredited 

to Universities of California and Stanford, and five 
Eastern universities. For catalogue apply 

P. R. BOONE. 2029 Duraol Arenue. Berkeley, Cil. 



MISS HEAD'S SCHOOL 
2538 Charming Way, Berkeley, Cal. 
Boarding and day school; college preparation: accredited to college" 
24th year, August 15. 1911. 
MARY E. WILSON, M. L., Principal. 



SNELL SEMINARY 
2721 Channing Way, Berkeley. 
Boarding and Bay School for girls. Beautiful location. Outdoor 
life. Accredited to LTniversity of California, Stanford. Wellesley, 
Mills and other colleges for women. Term opens August 9th 
MRS. EDNA SNELL POULSON, Principal. 



STAMMFR NO MORE Scientific Talking will cure you. 

O I ruiUUTll-iXY Hundreds have been cured under my 

Instructions, Why Not You? Write for particulars. 



M. L. HATFIELD 



.462 GROVE STREET, 



OAKLAND, CAL. 




THE BABY. 

How strange it seemed to wake last night 
And hear the baby breathe — the room 

Under the night-lamp's shaded light 
Wrapped softly in a gentle gloom ! 

What mystic wonder stirred us then, 
With joy and love what mingled awe, 

Before this little slumberer, when 
The flowerlike face we dimly saw! 

A moment there we hung appalled, 

Fearing to read in life's long scrolls 
Fate of this soul that we had called 

Out of the vasty deep of souls. 

Perhaps the Lord of Being bent 

That instant to our sudden prayer — 
For still the low breath came and went, 

But peace and blessing filled the air. 

— Harriet Prescott Spofford in Harper's Bazar. 



HIGHLAND JOY. 

(Wales.) 
The bluebells ring in the bracken, 
The heather bells on the hill ; 

The gorse is yellow, 

The sunlight mellow 
With music of wind and rill. 

Afar the mountains are rising, 
High Snowdon and all his knights, 

For some fair tourney 

With clouds that journey 
Up from the sea's blue bights. 

O winds, O waters, mountains, 
O earth with your singing sod, 

I'm glad of the weather 

That brings together 
My heart and the heart of God! 

— Cale Young Rice in Century. 



YOUTH. 

You hear Youth laughing down green, budding aisles, 
You glimpse her dancing limbs, her hair of gold. 

The care-free, sweet defiance of 'her smiles, 
For you are old. 

But I can see her eyes gray with alarm. 

Misty with longings that can find no tongue, 

The hooded Future clutching at her arm, 
For I am young. 

— Theresa He! burn in Century. 



Deimel linen mesh underwear is particularly suitable 

for these summer days, being warm enough for the cool even- 
ings and light enough for perfect comfort on the warm days. 
It is made of finest texture, is healthful and durable. At the 
Deimel store, 176 Sutter street, the wearer may be measured 
for made to order underwear, and the measurements being kept 
there, suits may be made and sent to summer resorts or to any 
address. Well-fitting under-garments are desired by all well- 
dressed people, and as much attention to the fit of underwear 
as to fit of shirts and outer garments. Deimel underwear grows 
in popularity every day. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 






July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



35 



STATEMENT 

OF THE CONDITION AND VALUE OF THE ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

HIBERNIA BANK < A Corporation) 

( MEMBER THE ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO ) 

Dated June 30, 1911 



ASSETS 

1— Bonds of the United States ($8,620,000.00), 
of the State of California and Municipalities 
thereof ($3,684,812.50), of the State of New 
York ($250,000.00), the actual value of 
which is $14,734,436.89 

2 — Cash in United States Gold and Silver Coin 

and Checks 1,533,467.11 

3 — Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of 

which is 6,559,825.61 



223,151.68 



$22,827,729.61 
They are: "San Francisco and North Pacific 
Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($476,- 
000.00), "Southern Pacific Branch Railway 
Company of California 6 per cent Bonds" 
($297,000.00), "Western Pacific Railway 
Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($250,000.00), 
"San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley Rail- 
way Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($120,- 
000.00), "Northern California Railway Com- 
pany 5 per cent Bonds" ($83,000.00), "South- 
ern Pacific Company, San Francisco Termi- 
nal 4 per cent Bonds" ($50,000.00), "Northern 
Railway Company of California 5 per cent 
Bonds" ($29,000.00), "San Francisco, Oak- 
land and San Jose Railway Company 5 per 
cent Bonds" ($5,000.00), "Southern Pacific 
Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds" 
($1,000.00), "Market Street Cable Company 
6 per cent Bonds" ($758,000.00), "Market 
Street Railway Company First Consolidated 
Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds" ($753,000.00), 
"Los Angeles Pacific Railroad Company of 
California Refunding 5 per cent Bonds" 
($400,000.00), "Los Angeles Railway Com- 
pany of California 5 per cent Bonds" ($334,- 
000.00), "Powell Street Railway Company 
6 per cent Bonds" ($185,000.00), "The Om- 
nibus Cable Company 6 per cent Bonds" 
($167,000.00), "Sutter Street Railway Com- 
pany 5 per cent Bonds" ($150,000.00), 
"Gough Street Railway Company 5 per cent 
Bonds" ($20,000.00), "Ferries and Cliff 
House Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds" 
($6,000.00), "The Merchants' Exchange 7 
per cent Bonds" ($1,465,000.00), "San Fran- 
cisco Gas and Electric Company 4 J 2 per cent 
Bonds" ($563,000.00), "Los Angeles Gas and 
Electric Comnany 5 per cent Bonds" ($100,- 
000.00), "Spring Valley Water Companv 4 
per cent Bonds" ($50,000.00). 

A — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 32,415,149.67 

The condition of said Promissory Notes 
and debts is as follows : They are all existing 
Contracts, owned by said Corporation, arid are 
payable to it at its office, which is situated 
at the corner of Market, McAllister and 
Jones streets, in the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California, and the pay- 
ment thereof is secured by First Mortgages 
on Real Estate within this State. Said Promis- 
sory Notes are kept and held by said Cor- 



poration at its said office, which is its princi- 
pal place of business, and said Notes and 
debts are there situated. 

5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and 
Debts is as follows: They are all existing 
Contracts, owned by said Corporation, and 
are payable to it at its office, which is situ- 
ated as aforesaid, and the payment thereof 
is secured by pledge and hypothecation of 
Bonds of Railroad and Quasi-Public Cor- 
porations and other securities. 

6 — (a) Real Estate situated in the City and 
County of San Francisco ($808,863.12), and 
in the counties of Santa Clara ($16,925.49), 
and Alameda ($2,825.97), in this State, the 

actual value of which is 

(b) The_ Land and Building in which said 
Corporation keeps its said office, the actual 

value of which is 1,002,301.90 

The condition of said Real Estate is that 
it belongs to said Corporation, and part of 
it is productive. 



828,614.58 



Total 



Assets $57,296,947.50 



LIABILITIES 
' — Said Corporation Owes Deposits amounting 

to and the actual value of which is $53,296,947.50 

(Number of Depositors, 81,452; 
Average Amount of Deposits, $654.00) 

2 — Reserve Fund, actual value 4,000,000.00 



Total 



Liabilities $57,296,947.50 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
By JAMES R. KELLY, President. 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
By R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County of San Francisco — ss. 

JAMES R. KELLY and R. M. TOBIN, being each duly 
sworn, each for himself, says: That said JAMES R. KELLY is 
President, and that said R. M. TOBIN is Secretary of THE 
HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Corpora- 
tion above mentioned, and i'r>at the foregoing statement is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY, President. 

R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 3d day of July, 1911. 

CHAS. T. STANLEY, 
Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California. 



Deposits made on or before Julv 10, 1911, will draw interest 
from luly 1. 1911. R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 



36 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 8, 1911. 



Western States Life Insurance Company 



Home Office 
SAN FRANCISCO 



WARREN R. PORTER 

President 



Capital and Surplus Fully Paid in Cash $1,355,516.99 

Policies Up to the Minute. 

Over Three Thousand "Booster" Stockholders. 

Desirable Territory Open in the Coast States for " Live Wires" 

ADDRESS 

H. J. SAUNDERS 

Second Vice-President and Manager of Agencies 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

FIRST CLASS GENERAL AGENCY PROPOSITIONS NOW OPEN IN TEXAS. 
UTAH, OREGON. AND SOUTHERN IDAHO FOR RIGHT PEOPLE 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $ 1,500,000 



Assets, $8,150,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 
San Francisco, California. 



Cash Capital, J400.000 



Cash Assets, $1,117,480.03 



Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Employers' Liability, General Liability. Teams, Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass, Personal Accident 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F, Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurer; F. P. Deering, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Botliln, Edward L. Brayton. John C. Cole- 
man, "W. E. Dean, F. P. Deering, E. F. Green, James K. Moffitt, J. W. 
Phillips, Henry Rosenfeld. Adolph A. Son. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 416 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 



The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital {1,000.000 

Surplus to Policyholders 3,060,063 

Total Assets 7,478.446 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING, 
Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 





British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 


Ltd. 




OF LIVERPOOL. 






..$6,700,000 




BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 




350 


California Street. Sa 


n Francisco 



The Wesl: CoasT: Life Insurance Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard, the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Geo. E. BillinRs Roy C. Ward James K. Polk 



J. C. Meussdorffer James W. Dean 



Geo. E. Billings Co. 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED 
312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 2283 

Home I'hooe C 289° 




INSVMCE 




State Insurance Commissioner J. H. Shively holds that cer- 
tificates issued prior to the passage of the new insurance code, 
and extended by that statute until April 1, 1912, will not per- 
mit holding companies to write any business not authorized by 
the new law. This construction will prohibit the writing of 
boiler, machinery and sprinkler insurance by surety or liability 
companies, despite the advice many prominent attorneys have 
given that they can continue to accept new business. Any 
boiler, machinery or sprinkler insurance written by companies 
authorized to do so under the old law and written for a period 
of years will be continued in force. A general warning was 
sent out to surety companies that the new law would drive them 
out of this branch of the business, and they were advised to do 
as much business as possible prior to the taking effect of the 
new law. As the companies can write policies for from three 
to five years, they have an opportunity to carry their clients 
through until after the next legislative session, when an effort 
will be made to amend the insurance code. 

Fifty members of the San Francisco Life Underwriters' As- 
sociation met President Henry J. Powell, at a St. Francis Hotel 
luncheon, following a business meeting at one o'clock Thurs- 
day, enthusiasm running high, and many new members were 
elected. Yesterday (Friday) he was the Association's guest 
to Mount Tamalpais and other points of interest and entertain- 
ment has been provided until Sunday morning, when he leaves 
for the Pacific Northwest. He was in Portland July 3d; Spo- 
kane July Sth; and Seattle, July 6th, planning to be in attend- 
ance at the Winnipeg Convention on the 12th, 13th and 14th, at 
which time he will have visited every local life association in 
the United States and Canada, having been on the road since 
July 1st. No business of importance was transacted during Mr. 
Powell's visit, the time being devoted to speech-making and re- 
creation 

* * * 

The last of the Santa Rosa, Cal., earthquake and the fire 
appeals were decided last week in an opinion written by Jus- 
tice Chipman. The judgment and the order of the Sonoma 
County Superior Court were reversed by the Appellate Court. 
The case was that of F. C. Loomis vs. Connecticut Fire Insur- 
ance Company. In the lower court the jury found for the plain- 
tiff, and the insurance company appealed from this judgment. 
The contention hinged on whether or not the fire occurred be- 
fore or after the earthquake. The jury found that the building 
did not fall from the shock, but in his opinion Justice Chipman 
declares that it was plainly shown that the building, or part of 
it, fell from the quake, and that the fire broke out after the 
shock. The policy on which it was sought to recover contained 
the earthquake clause. 

Information which may be considered authoritative, has come 
to us that Charles A. Bradley of the Golden State Life, of Los 
Angeles, has resigned as vice-president and director of 
agencies. He was the strong man of the company, and through 
his agency the company has acquired over three million in re- 
ceiving business in thirteen months. Mr. Bradley will join J. K. 
Tennant, organizer and agency manager of the California 
National Life of San Diego, practically in the same capacity. 
It is a matter for surprise that the Golden State Life should 
have let him go. 

* * * 

The law enacted by the present California Legislature at its 
recent session permits the operation of mutual companies after 
June 29th, and many mutual fire insurance companies from 
other States will begin writing business in California during 
the month of July if their present appeals for admission are 
granted. Applications on file with Insurance Commissioner 
Cooper include the Northwestern Mutual, Seattle; Fitchburg 
Mutual, Massachusetts: Central Manufacturers' Mutual, Bos- 
ton; Pennsylvania Lumbermen's, Philadelphia; Lumbermen's 
Mutual, Mansfield, Ohio. 






July 8, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



37 



A. M. Shields, California manager of the Equitable Life, has 
recently returned from a 5,000 mile trip to Southern California 
and Mexico in his six-cylinder American Tourist. He was ac- 
companied by his wife and daughter. To make the trip occu- 
pied a little more than a month. Leaving here in the early part 
of May, Paso Robles, 235 miles from San Francisco, was made 
in eight and a half hours. Shields is one of the Equitable's 
big writers, and is always found hovering about the top of the 
top-notchers. 

* * * 

William G. Whilden, President of the New Jersey Fire, has 
been here for several days endeavoring to establish a connec- 
tion with some agency for a California representation. State 
agencies will be established by him throughout the Coast, both 
for the New Jersey and the Monongahela Underwriters, which 
is made up of the American Union and the Monongahela Fire 

Insurance companies. 

* * * 

A new 50 h. p. automobile hose wagon, capacity 2,000 feet 
of hose, is now in service at Station No. 1, First avenue be- 
tween Washington and Stevenson streets, Spokane, Wash. This 
is a new hose company, and increases the amount of hose avail- 
able in the business district on a first alarm to 6,000 feet. 

* * * 

The Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company of California is 
continuing along the road of prosperity. During the five months 
ended May 31st it made a fine showing. In that period, pre- 
miums to the amount of $55,031 were written or renewed in the 
local agency, showing a monthly average of $9,921. 

The National Surety Company last Thursday sent to the city 
of Reno a check for ten thousand dollars to pay the bond of E. 
H. Christie, Reno's former city clerk, now serving a term for 
embezzlement of city money. Only a few days ago the surety 
company refused to pay, and invited the city to sue for the 
money, which it did. 

* * * 

At the first annual meeting of the stockholders of the San 
Francisco Life Insurance Company, held last Friday, former 
Assistant Secretary Gordon Thompson was elected to fill vacan- 
cies in the board. The company has written about two million 
since beginning business in January last. 

* * * 

Angus Allmond, assistant General Manager of the Reliance 
Life's Coast division, which includes twelve States, has moved 
his headquarters from San Francisco to Denver in order to keep 
in closer touch with his agency directors. 

* * * 

R. S. Miller; who was last week relieved of the Northern 
California management of the Los Angeles Fire by H. W. Col- 
son, former general agent of the Seaboard Fire, has gone to 
work for the Los Angeles as special agent in the same territory. 

* * * 

The Equitable Surety Company, of St. Louis, was recently 
licensed by the California Insurance Department. A. P. Red- 
ding, former secretary of the Pacific Surety Company, will rep- 
resent the company in this State. 

* * * 

H. Yourstone, formerly with the Metropolitan Life, and sub- 
sequently an organizer of fraternal insurance societies, has been 
appointed agency director for the Occidental Life of Los An- 
geles. 

* * * 

The American Union's application to become a member of 
the Fire Underwriters' Association of the Pacific was favorably 

acted upon at a meeting of the board to-day. 

* * * 

In addition to the City of New York, the Bertheau-Watson 
agency has secured the California agency of the Northern In- 
surance Company of New York. 

* * * 

G. Bergner, former special agent for the Washington Fire, 
has taken the San Francisco agency under General Agent Mar- 
shall A. Frank, of the Pacific Coast Casualty Company. 



SAN FRANCISCO LIFE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

HOME OFFICE: 57 POST STREET, 7th Floor 
San Francisco 

JOHN A. KOSTER, President 

THE BEST POLICIES ON EARTH TO SELL 

THE BEST MEN WANTED TO SELL THEM 

THE BEST CONTRACTS TO THE BEST MEN 

SEE OUR LIST OF STOCKHOLDERS 

Address the Company 
CATHCART MACGURN. Asst. General Manager and Director of Agencies 



Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company of California 

Insure Against LOSS OF INCOME, EARNING POWER, OR SALARY 

F. A. STEARNS, Manager Accident Department 
SHREVE BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 



H. ALTMAYER, Pres. H. T. ADAMS, Mgr. 

FARNSWORTH 

Electrical Works 

132-138 SECOND STREET San Francisco, Cal. 

WE RENT MOTORS 

Best Equipped Repair Shop on the Coast 

Call or write for Prices 



Phone Franklin 5322 Home Phone C 2563 

DOUAT & FENTON 

ELECTRICIANS MOTOR EXPERTS 

Wiring Supplies Installations Repairs 

136 EDDY STREET near Mason San Francisco 



The Bounder — I say, old man, I wish you'd make a point 

of being in this evening. I — ah, want to see you about marryin' 
one of your gals. The Major — With pleasure. Which do you 
want — the cook or the housemaid — what? — London Opinion. 



Murphy Grant & Company 

■Wholesale Dry Goods Furnishing Goods 

Notions White Goods Laces 

N. E. comer Bush and Sansome Streets. San Francisco. 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne 

PAPER 

1400 to 1460 Fourth St. San Francisco. Telephone Market 301-4 
Private Elxchanre Connecting all Department* 



INVERNESS 

The most beautiful Summer 
Outing Home In America, 

where sea and pine meet, two 

hours from San Francisco, thro' 
tall redwoods of Marin. Delight- 
fully wooded villa lots overlooking 
Tomales Bay, only $200; $20 down, 
$7.50 monthly, no Interest. Go 

with us to see this property. 

Call or write for catalogue. 

CM.WoosterCo 

702 Market St. 



POPULAR HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS 




< V~ - 



Fitch Mountain Tavern 

NOW OPEN 



Three hears from San Francisco, on Russian river. Two miles 
of fine boating and bathing; livery and auto; hunting and fishing; 
dancing; good music; raise our berries, fruit, etc. ; big fireplace; 
no bar. One and one-half miles from Healdsburg; 'bus meets 
trains. $3 a day, $12 to $1R per week. Special rates to families. 
Trout h-Uchery in connection. 

A. M. EWING, Healdsburg 

Readers when communicating with this resort will please mention 
the News Letter. 



CASA DEL REY 

SANTA CRUZ CAL. 

300-Room Fireproof Hotel. 

Large and well-appointed 
Grill Room facing the 
Beach. 

Everything new and first-class. 

AN UP-TO-DATE AND MODERN HOTEL 



Anderson Springs 

The springs that did the business in Lake County last year. Now 
open. The greatest resort for health and pleasure; the only natural 
mineral steam baths in Lake County. Natural hot sulphur and 
Iron Baths. Board — $10 to $14 per week. No extra charge for 
baths. How to reach the Springs — Take Oakland ferry at 7:40 
a. m., or S. P. train to Calistoga, arrive 11:30 for lunch; Spiers 
stage to springs; arrive at Anderson Springs at 4 p. m., distance 
21 miles. Fare, $7 round trip from San Francisco. Address all com- 
munications to MISS ROSE ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Mid- 
dletown, Lake County, Cal. 

NOTE. — Best route for autos is via steamer to Vallejo. thence 
through Napa, Calistoga and Middletown. Perfect roads all the way. 



Make LAKE COUNTY by the Scenic Route 

The most comfortable way to make Lake County is by Wm. Spier's 
stage line over the best mountain road in Cal. Grand scenery; easy 
carriages: careful drivers; round trip from San Francisco to Harbin, 
Anderson and Mira Vista, $7; to Adams, Seiglers; Bonanza, Ho- 
bergs. Howard, Astorg, Spiers and Glenbrook, $9. Stages leave 
Calistoga 11:30 a. m., Sundays excepted. Half hour for lunch at 
Calistoga. Fifty pounds baggage allowed. Automobiles furnished 
when desired. Tickets on sale at Southern Pacific Office. 



NOW IS THE TIME TO VISIT BEAUTIFUL 

Hotel Del Monte 

Nature is in her loveliest dress. The ride from San 
Francisco either by train or auto is through miles of 
blossom land. At Del Monte every facility for out- 
door life is provided. 

FINEST 18-HOLE ALL GRASS COURSE IN AMERICA 

Is within five minutes walk of the Hotel. 

Motor roads are in fine condition. 

Del Monte Express leaves at 2 p. m. daily. 

H. R. Warner, Manager 



PARAISO 

HOT SPRINGS 



Now's the Time to Visit 
California's Real Paradise 



Weather and scenery unsurpassed. Only 4 hours 
from San Francisco. Wonderful natural hot soda 
and sulphur; guaranteed for rheumatism, liver, kid- 
ney and all stomach troubles. New garage. Expert 
masseurs. Rates $12 to $16, including baths. 

Round trip $6.35, including auto. Roads perfect, 
autos already running daily. 



Leave Third and Townsend 8:05 A. M. First and 
Broadway, Oakland, 7:17 A. M. 

Booklets Peck-Judah; Bryan's 149 Montgomery Street or 



H. H. McGOWAN, Proprietor and Manager 

MONTEREY COUNTY 



The ANCHORAGE 

The Most Beautiful Spot in the Santa Cruz Mountains, 
for health and pleasure First-clays table, cottages, tents, tennis, 
(roquet, daiicin&r, fishing, swimming, etc. ; 50 acres redwood, pine 
and madrone; altitude 1900 feet; rates $9 and $11. Meets trains by 
appointment at Alma Station, S. P.; round trip from San Francisco, 
$2.50. Address 

CLAUDE C. MOORE, Patchln, Santa Clara Co. 
Tel. Alma 67. 



BEACH HILL INN 



SANTA CRUZ. 



NOW OPEN. 



Popular family resort overlooking beach. Address: 

MISS A. PORTER. Santa Cruz. Cal. Phone Santa Cruz 238. 



HOWARD SPRINGS 

LAKE COUNTY. 42 MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Llthla for kidneys; hot iron bath, 110 degrees, for rheumatism. The 
waters of the Hot Magnesia Spring- have a wonderful record Jn the 
cure of stomach trouble. $12 to $18 per week. J. W. LAYMANCE, 
Prop., Howard Springs, Lake County. 



Among the Pines 

TWIT O ATC S Tne driest equipped mountain resort in the 
a iiu v/f ix^kj Sierras is The Oaks at Applegate. All kinds 
of amusements. Saddle and driving- horses; our own fruits and 
vegetables; large dairy; good trout fishing and hunting. 
No consumptives Fare Round Trip $5.35 

Illustrated Booklet and Rates write to AL. KUHN, Appleirate, Cal. or 

PECK-JUDAH INFORMATION BUREAU. San Francisco 



July 8, 1911. 



POPULAR HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS. 



39 




THE QUEEN OF LAKE COUNTY RESORTS 

Highland Springs 

OPEN THE YEAR ROUND.. New and strictly first-class man- 
agement. Information and booklets regarding Highland Springs 
may be obtained at the Peck-Judah Free Information Bureau, 789 
Market street. For particulars, address W. H. MARSHALL, 
Proprietor, Highland Springs, Lake County, Cal. 



TALLAC and 
BROCKWAY 



Lake Tahoe 



The scenic resorts that have made 
Lake Tahoe famous. Open June 1st, 
under same management as in past 
years. Fishing season opens June 
1st; June fishing always best. 

LAWRENCE & COMSTOCK 
Tallac, Cal. and Brockway, Cal. 



Out of the winds and 
fogs these trying days. 
In the midst of a garden. 

THE PENINSULA 



San Mateo, 



California 



A delightful, pleasingly situate 
hotel. Near to San Francisco. 
Only 30 minutes' ride. 



Rates on application 



JAS. H. DOOLITTLE, Manager 



LAKE COUNTY AUTOMOBILE 
TRANSPORTATION CO. 

3 from PIETA 
t.» HIGHLAND SPRINGS, I.AKI-roRT, KELSETVTLLE, SODA 
BAT, BARTLBTT SPRINGS and UPPER LAKE. Fine mountatr. 

rime for lunch at Plat*. Charges on automobll 
addition i«> regular one-waj stage fare t*> Highland S] 

Tickets on sale :it office Nor 

tcet St. 



Hummer's Solid Comfort Couch Hammock 

THE CLIMAX OF REPOSE— A PARAGON OF LUXURY Perfect 

and substantia] In construction. For practicability, rlurabii* 
be&ut] il la Hi.' i r ..i all similar devices I 




2S "' TENTS, CAMP FURNITURE, ETC. 

WEST OF THE ROCKIES 

W. A. Plummer Manufacturing Co. 

PINE AND FRONT STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO 
Home C 1971 Kearny 5560 Send for Illustrated Catalogue 



Hotel del Coronado 



Motto: "BEST OF EVERYTHING" 
Most Delightful Climate on Earth 



AMERICAN PLAN 

Summer Rates— $3.50 per day and upward 



Power boats from the hotel meet passengers from the north on 
the arrival of the Pacific Coast S. S. Company steamers. Golf, 
Tennis. Polo and otber outdoor sports every day In the year. New 
700-foot ocean pier, for fishing. Boating and bathing are the very 
best Send for booklet to MORGAN ROSS. Manager, Coronado 
Beach, Cal., or see H. F. NORCROSS. Agent, 334 So. Spring St., 
Los Angeles. Tel. A 6783; Main 3917. 



Hotel BEN LOMOND 

AND COTTAGES 

At Ben Lomond. Santa Crur. County, Cal. Beautifully located 
on the San Lorenzo river; finest of trout fishing, boating, etc.; only 
9 miles from beach. Santa Cruz First-class accommodations, elec- 
tric-lighted rooms, biilr..- Terms, 12.50 per day. {14 
to $16 per week. 8] - to famlUec inday, round 
trip. $2.60: Saturd.. . $3; good to October 31. $3.50. For 
further particulars send for booklet or apply Peck-Judah Co., 789 
lake train 8:10 a. m.. 3:15 p. m., 
nd Tuwnsen.i -' P- m.. Oakland pier. 

CHATFIELD & KASPAREK. Props. 



40 



POPULAR HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS. 



July 8, 1911. 



"Dear Clara," wrote the young man, "pardon me, but I'm 

getting so forgetful. I proposed to you last night, but really 
forget whether you said yes or no." "Dear Will," she replied 
by note, "so glad to hear from you. I know I said 'No' to some 
one last night, but I had forgotten just who it was." — London 
Opinion. _^_^ 




The favorite resort for 
tourists, sight seers, 
health and pleasure- 
seekers. A greater 
variety of mineral 
waters than in any 
other place in Amer- 
ica. The only natural 
mineral, steam and 
hammam bath, having 
great curative quali- 
ties. We positively 
cure rheumatism and 
stomach trouble. The 
hotel and bath houses have been thoroughly renovated and put in 
excellent shape for this season. Our table will be supplied with the 
best the 1 larket affords. The road from Cloverdale has been 
widened and put in splendid order for staging and automobiles. All 
kinds of amusements, including dancing, every evening. Round- 
trip ticket good for six months via Cloverdale. $8. Good hunting 
and fishing. Rates, $2.50 to S3 per day. $14 to $16 per week. Child- 
ren from $7 to ?9 per week. Special rates for families and long- 
termers. For further information, call on Peck-Judah Information 
Bureau, 7S9 Market street, or address R. H. CURRY, Proprietor, 
The Geysers, Cal. 



MT.TAMALPAIJ 





VIA 


SAUSADTO 


-EBRV 




Lr. SAK FRANCISCO 


Li. HUH WOODS 


II, HT. TMMINIS ^k 


WmUii 


Sofldir 


WieMir 


SDBdfl 

11 45a 


■MM 


&llin ^K 


9 45, 


8 15a 


t7 20a 


7 20a 


xlO 10a ■ 


1 45p 


9 15b 


1 40p 


12 50p 


140p 


11 15a B 


•4 45p 


9 45a 


•|2 40p 


2 40p 


4 45p 


12 Wp ■ 




10 45a 


4 50p 3 50p 


*10 00p 


2 32p ■ 




It 45a 


4 50p 




3 40p ■ 




1 4bp 


5 50p 




*40b ■ 




2 45p 


6 45p 




5 40a S 




3 4bp 


1 




6 40p.^ 



*Sa![rtirj oalr. tMoidirs mil. Wl Tanalaals 

lUtlr wm: oilr. 

TICKET OFFICES: 

Saosjlllo Ferry, til. Kearny 4980 

' k IT4HllUI,Tll.00l{llsl4O7^ 

IvGEH'L OFFICE:^ 

11 Vina 

Mel.WV.. 



The ABBEY 



MILL VALLEY 



Firgt-class hotel; tent cottages with hot and cold runnine 

water; rates $12.50 and up; fine tennis court. Address 

Box 786 or Phone 761, Mill Valley 



SEIGLER 

HOT SPRINGS, Lake County. Natural hot baths for rheumatism, 
stomach trouble, malaria, etc. Swimming pond, baths free. ?10 to 
J14 a week. Automobile livery. MISS M. STAULDING, Seigler, 
Lake County, Cal. Information PECK-JUDAH CO., 789 Market 
street, San Francisco. 



TENTS and FLAGS 

Why not buy your FLAGS from people who make them and save the Middle Man's 

profit. We have a large stock of FLAGS to select from and are convinced that our 

prices are the lowest. 

WEEKS-HOWE-EMERSON COMPANY 

51 Market Street San Francisco, Cal. 



HOTEL BON AIR 



SPECIAL SATURDAY NIGHT DINNER 



6 TO 8 O'CLOCK 



Ready for guests under new management. 
Fifty minutes from San Francisco. 



M. A. SMYTH E, Lessee and Manager. 
Larkspur P. 0., ESCALLE, Marin County Phone: San Rafael 2431 



HARBIN SPRINGS 



NEW MANAGEMENT; NEWLYT FURNISHED THROUGHOUT; 
NEW SERVICE; EXCELLENT TABLE. Our own garden, orchard 
and dairy. Famous hot and cold curative mineral waters free to 
guests. Masseur. Roger Cornell. Trout fishing; deer hunting; gym- 
nasium, livery, drives, trails, automobile trips, hotel, cottages, tents. 
Room, board and baths, .$12 per week and up. Inquire at S. P. Of- 
fices; Examiner, 74 Geary St.; Peck-Judah's, 789 Market street; or 
BOOTH, CARR & BOOTH, Proprietors, Harbin Springs, Lake Co. 








1 1 

HI 1 , II fij 

FFFrtfoTWE'g' 

i 



Hotel 

Belleclaire 



BROADWAY 
at 77th ST. 



SUBWAY 
79th Street 



33 



New York City 



HEADQUARTERS FOR CALIFORNIANS 

Thoroughly Modern and Fireproof 
FAMILY— TRANSIENT HOTEL 

Rates: with bath $2.50 per day up 

ELMER F. WOODBURY, Prop. 
Formerly of the Maryland, Pasadena Hotel St. Mark, Oakland 



Hotel Westminster 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. Fourth and Main Sta. 

American Plan Reopened. 

Rates per day, $2.50, rooms without bath 
Rooms with bath, $3, $3.50 and $4. 

European Plan 

$i.OO per day and up. 
■With bath $1.50 and up. 

E. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



Hotel Sacramento 

SACRAMENTO, CALA. 

Eleeant new fire-proof construction. Service as perfect as 
expert management can produce. 

ALBERT BETTENS. Proprietor. 



HOTEL de REDWOOD 

IN THE HEART OF THE REDWOODS TWO 
AND ONE-HALF MILES FROM LAUREL 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS 



P.O. Address WRIGHTS, R. F. D.. CAL. 
J. E. SER0Y. Lessee md Manager 



Telephone $8 to $12 per week 

Meet parlies at train on notification 




taUUUh. J fuly «. AM 



Devoted to tho Landing Intoroata of California and tho Pacific Coaat. 




VOL. LXXXII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 15, 191 1 



III. 2 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott. 21 Sutter street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where Information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 

London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements, or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



Painter de Longpre leaves an estate of some $60,000 to 

prove that art does not always starve in a garret. 

Mexican politics without Diaz is a good deal like a 

socialist picnic minus police protection or interference. 

Don't tell your troubles to a policeman ; tell them to the 

head-bartender at McDonough Bros', bail-and-drink emporium. 

Japan, having scrutinized the Dreadnaught price list, is 

in a tearing hurry to get in on that Anglo-American peace pact. 

Brother Charley's business affairs with the Government 

constitute the latest worry to put a crimp in that famous White 
House smile. 

■ Say what you like about California Legislators, but it 

took an ex-lawmaker from Massachusetts to get arrested for 
robbing a blind beggar couple. 

This sailing of steamships overland does not go so very 

well and is expensive, but at least it serves to locate definitely 
the hard spots on our coastline. 

The old party with the scythe is standing grim and 

watchful at the bedside of John W. Gates, waiting for him to 
make another "bet a million" offer. 

New York is getting ready for a 100-story office build- 
ing that will be 1200 feet high. By to-morrow, yesterday's 
skyscraper will look like a hen house. 

When Ethel Barrymore married a Colt she did not under- 
stand that it was an automatic self-loader, or that it would con- 
tinue to kick up both heels all the time. 

The modern idea of pedagogy makes the school-marm — 

God bless her! — a mild and gentle creature who wouldn't lick 
a postage stamp no matter how it behaved. 

One of New Jersey's new fad laws prohibits the supply- 
ing of public drinking cups, but makes no provision for private 
cups. Bring your own container, or go thirsty. 

Another Berkeley man has dropped out of sight, but 

from the fact that he forethoughtfully took along about $10,000 
it may be inferred that he landed on a soft place. 

It may take nine tailors to make a man, but under the 

latter-day theory of medicine, it takes about five hungry doc- 
tors to find out what hurts him, and to try to cure it. 

The lady whose classic profile adorns the American do! 

lar is here with the teachers. Most of her countrymen devote 
their days to collecting these likenesses of her, and their night ^ 
to kissing the same pretty pictures good-bye. 



Good old David Starr Jordan is whanging away for total 

abstinence just as if Stanford University had never taken in 
a dollar of revenue from that good old Tehama County brandy. 

James Whitcomb Riley, Indiana's pet poet, finds 

strength on his bed of mortal illness to give Indianapolis a 
$75,000 site for a library. Let the Laird of Skibo look sharp. 

Now they are talking in England about a British statue 

of George Washington to be put up on their soil with their 
money. The band will kindly refrain from playing "Yankee 
Doodle." 

British court circles are all worked up because John 

Hays Hammond actually nudged 'Is Majesty. Most any king 
would be glad to get a mining stock nudge from this same 
Hammond. 

The State highway bonds are to be ready this month. 

That will be quite time enough, considering that the commis- 
sioners to spend the money have not yet been named by Em- 
peror Johnson. 

When he is not writing checks for the ladies he marries, 

versatile Nat Goodwin puts his pen to work setting down their 
foibles for the amusement of a world that has paid him well to 
make it laugh. 

A national department of health looks like the first step 

toward the establishment of a doctorocracy, which is a kind of 
government the plain men would rather not meet up an alley 
on a dark night. 

While the Government is looking into the trusts — the 

lumber trust, the steel trust, the tobacco trust — why can't it take 
a slant at the ingodwe trust, and find out what makes it come 
so hard and go so easy. 

Some playful little ones in Pennsylvania enlivened their 

Fourth of July celebration by loading father's pipe with pow- 
der. When father is around again, there will be further casu- 
alties to add to the annual list. 

Old Doc. Bunyon may not know all there is to know 

about medical science, but he has an infallible prescription for 
curing newspapers of fool notions concerning medical ethics, 
and he applies it next to pure reading matter. 

"Kid" Sullivan is not yet among those mentioned as 

likely candidates for chief of police, but he might well enough 
figure at the top of the list. The "Kid's" goat has been re- 
turned to him by the municipal administration. 

Yes, Mayor McCarthy is running for office — running in 

a high-geared automobile. He opens the race by running over 
a boy, but you will have noticed, fellow citizens, that he did 
not select the offspring of a San Francisco voter. 

Organized labor's latest plan is to unionize the three 

million tramps of the United States. For this purpose, the 
"Weary Willies" are to be called "migratory workers." Any 
railroad permitting use of its tracks and brakebeams by hoboes 
not carrying union cards will be on the "unfair" list. 



EDDDTOROAL 



C© 



INT 



It is a sign and symptom of munici- 
A Joke on the. pal politics that the Geary street 

Tax-Payer. road should be built by day's labor. 

That is the way not only to make 
work but to make jobs. Get a McCarthy button and get on the 
payroll. Organize a McCarthy club or collect a deliverable 
bunch of votes, and be a foreman or a time-keeper or something 
else that involves no more labor than standing around. 

Except in its political aspect, and considered as a campaign 
asset and factor, the municipal street railway begins as a joke 
— a joke on the tax-payer. How it will finish, if ever, is an- 
other question, one that is not troubling the "present speaker." 
The sole idea at the present time is to furnish easy and remun- 
erative employment for as many as possible of the faithful on 
such terms that it will be an entirely legal method of doing 
exactly what caused tne shame and scandal down in darkest 
Ohio and over in Danville, 111. A job is not a bribe, but it 
can be made to serve the same purpose and accomplish the 
same end of politics. 

The Mayor went into office roaring promises of what he 
would do in the matter of securing an ample and cheap water 
supply for the city. Just look what he has done in that re- 
gard. He shouted aloud his determination to build and run 
a municipally owned and conducted railroad in Geary street. 
Now, almost at the end of his term, and not until after he had 
made up his curious mind to run again, he starts things in that 
direction — merely starts them, mind you. If he is defeated for 
re-election, then there will be no need to drive the work after 
election day. If he wins, why, then, by judicious management 
the Geary street affair can be saved for a possible emergency 
in 1915. 

The honest, sincere, effective way to build the Geary street 
line would be by contract. Labor would get just as much per 
hour for its hire, but the laborers would have to work or get 
off the job, and — this is the important item — the contractor, 
not Mayor McCarthy, would make up the payroll. The fact is, 
that there is no honest or sincere intention to build the Geary 
street road. The manifest design is to use it as a means where- 
by the money of the city can be used to make votes for McCar- 
thy, without incurring any risk of Grand Jury inquisitiveness. 
It is an elegant opportunity to do economical politics wholly 
at the expense of the people. 

is- 
An evil which seems almost impos- 
Shocks that are sible of correction under existing 

Worse than a Quake, conditions has shown its ugly head 
again in consequence upon the 
earthquake of July 1st — the first sharp shake San Francisco has 
experienced since the parlous, unforgettable days of 1906. It 
was, in all truth, as much of a temblor as any city would care 
to endure, but it did no physical harm. The damage in terms 
of money or of inconvenience was actually too small to be 
measured in dollars and cents. There was, however, a moral 
damage not now to be estimated. That damage was done by 
the irregular and irresponsible newspaper correspondents and 
the fly-by-night press agencies that live and thrive by faking 
and exaggeration. 

These buzzards and jackals of the news field send out, 
widely, reports of the quake calculated to make most sensa- 
tional news, and the newspapers that deal with such creatures 
did not by any means minimize the reports. Huge headlines 
and big body type were used on front pages to tell how San 
Francisco had been stricken again; how new, great buildings 
were wrenched, cracked and thrown out of plumb; how people 
rushed out of homes, stores and theatres in a frenzy of fear; 
how some were injured in the mad rush for safety, and others, 



Sea Captains' 
Authority Menaced. 



with weak hearts, died of the shock and fright; how business 
was stopped and how the citizenry were in a condition of terror 
and despair. 

In newspaper parlance, the sensation-monging sheets "ate 
it up." Journals like the Denver Post and the Seattle Times 
and Post-Intelligencer treated the quake as if it had all but de- 
stroyed San Francisco. They reveled in description of what 
never occurred. Reading their accounts, one might well have 
believed that the disaster of 1906 had been outdone in horror. 

It is impossible to calculate the harm done to the city by pub- 
lications of this kind. Unquestionably there are many who 
will never be reached by denial of the false and faked des- 
patches, and who will never see the more accurate reports sent 
out by responsible and reliable news sources. We shall never 
know how many tourists headed this way changed their plans 
and routes, nor will we be able to find out how many people 
with exposition projects involving large investments here de- 
cided not to come when they read that the city was once more 
rocked and racked by the forces of the earth. 

It would appear to be the province of the civic and commer- 
cial bodies to devise some means for dealing with the disrepu- 
tables who send out such reports and for forcing retraction and 
correction from the newspapers that printed these malignant 
lies. Certainly something should be done at once to counteract 
the evil impression created by the fakers. It will not do to let 
the matter drop without notice. San Francisco has too much 
at stake to permit any such libel upon her to go unchallenged. 

»■ 
Easily and naturally enough, wire- 
less has been perverted from its in- 
tended function in navigation, at 
least for coastwise traffic, so that 
it is not altogether a blessing. It makes a clerk of the captain 
as long as the apparatus holds out, and deprives him of occa- 
sion or opportunity to use that skill and judgment which are 
presupposed in the masters of vessels that carry passengers. 

In the wreck of the Santa Rosa, which cost enough lives and 
came near costing many more, it was shown how a minor officer 
of the company, sitting comfortable and at ease in a far-off city 
office, issued the orders that, whatever the captain may say to 
save his job, determined how and when the passengers of the 
doomed vessel should be dealt with. The man in the office 
could see nothing of the rising sea and the bleak fog-hung shore. 
He could see nothing of the plight of more than three hundred 
passengers waiting from early morning until perilous evening 
for something to be done toward their safety. As he admits, 
the man in the office thought of it all in terms of money and 
expense. He was more concerned about the vouchers than for 
the lives involved. It was dollars and cents and book-keeping 
against all that company of anxious, helpless souls. 

It can be guessed with accuracy that had the captain been 
out of wireless touch with his superiors he would have promptly 
transferred his passengers to the waiting rescue steamers while 
the sea was smooth and the danger practically nothing. That 
would have been the course dictated by ordinary seamanship. 
By noon they would all have been safe and comfortable on land. 
They would have been spared many needless hardships and 
their relatives would have escaped a night of fearful anxiety. 
But the man in the office held the situation with the intangible 
currents of the wireless telegraph and almost sent all the three 
hundred to their death. 

The natural conclusion from this and similar sea experiences . 
since wireless came in as a factor of the problem of navigation 
is that there must be some legal establishment in authority and 
responsibility of the vessel's master in time of wreck or peril. 
He is the man on the scene, the man of sea-knowledge and 



July 15, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



The Hetch-Hetchy 
Scheme in Trouble. 



sea-judgment, such as no shore-dweller, no office manager, 
could possibly have. It is his personally to weigh and measure 
peril and prospect, and to take the chances, leaving until after- 
ward and to the owners the figuring out of rates and costs of 
rescue. Before wireless the captain was the judge, sole and 
supreme. Now, when every coast-plying passenger boat is in 
continuous communication with the owners ashore, there is 
need of new legislation to put upon the captain the responsibil- 
ity he used to have and to clothe him with his old authority. 

3B- 
City Engineer Manson and the 
Supervisors are getting the city of 
San Francisco into deep water by 
their haste in endeavoring to pur- 
chase the water rights of Cherry Creek. Manson is now in the 
Lake Eleanor country with expensive Eastern expert engi- 
neers "looking into the system." These engineers were em- 
ployed to give an expert opinion on Spring Valley and its 
sources, and not to be sent out on junketing trips at an added 
expense to the city. 

And now comes a suit at law to quiet title to the properties 
in question by the National Park Electric Power Company. 
The suit has been brought in Sonora, county seat of Tuolumne 
County, and names the city and county of San Francisco as co- 
defendants with William Ham Hall and the Tuolumne com- 
pany. The National Park Electric Power Company claims 
prior title to all of Hall's claims in Cherry Creek. 

This action substantiates just what the News Letter has been 
claiming for weeks past. We believe that Ham Hall and asso- 
ciates cannot deliver the goods, and therefore no moneys should 
be paid for land that does not carry with it the absolute title to 
water rights — which we doubt San Francisco will ever get. And, 
again, the United States Government is still to be heard from 
in regard to Lake Eleanor and Hetch-Hetchy. Should the 
Government refuse to relinquish claim to that property, what 
will this city do with a lot of grazing land ? 

As far as the naming of the city as co-defendant in the 
suit with Hall and his company is concerned, City Attorney 
Percy V. Long declares that the city will take no action in the 
suit, leaving it entirely in the hands of Hall to clear the title. 
Unless this is accomplished, says Long, the proposed acquisi- 
tion from them by the city of the Cherry Creek properties will 
be dropped. 

Why not drop it now? Why not let the parties at interest 
come forward with clear titles before paying them thousands of 
dollars for land that has no value to San Francisco? We want 
water, not grazing lands. 

The Merchants' Association, or some kindred organization, 
should bring suit at once, and prevent the payment by the city 
officials of the $652,000 to Hall and associates. 

There are other sources of supply which are far better and 
far cheaper than the Hetch-Hetchy that can be obtained with- 
out the annoyance of law suits. 

The Sierra Blue Lakes water, for instance, may be pur- 
chased with clear titles for something like $30,000,000 less 
than Hetch-Hetchy, and can be made available in three years 
instead of ten. Why not consider that proposition? 



The Patriotic 
School Teachers 



Perhaps the master-note of signifi- 
cance in the great convention of 
school teachers this week in San 
Francisco is the note of patriotism. 
Its public schools are, after all, the chief glory and the main 
bulwark of the republic. Free education is the prime requisite, 
the sine qua non of a free people in a nation built as ours is 
built. Education is the leveler, the leaven, the ladder of ascer 
for the individual and the nation, the prophylactic against 



national disease, the preventive of dry rot in our fundamental 
: ilnciples, the check upon ambition set too high, the great 

ualizer of wealth, rank and power. 

And the free education of the American public schools de- 
penda more upon the spirit of the teaching than on anything 
else. So they are tremendously important to the national weal, 
these men and women gathered this week in San Francisco. 
Their notions of right and wrong, their theories of Government 
and of society are the notions that will prevail all over the land 
in this and the next generation. Thus we have watched with 
the keenest interest their struggles to establish and maintain an 
unfettered democracy of thought and action as to the internal 
economy of their own organization. We have applauded the 
struggles of their insurgent element against narrow tradition 
and exclusive and oligarchical administration. 

Let it be remembered that these are the interpreters to our 
youth of the history and traditions of the republic and of all 
that went before it in the evolution of earth's greatest manifes- 
tation of popular Government. As they teach, so will the men 
and women of the next thirty years believe. They have it in 
their hands and brains to determine the course of the nation 
for a period far outlasting their own personal period of ac- 
tivity. 

In this view it is hopeful and reassuring to find the majority 
of the vast army of instruction so democratic in theory, so 
sturdily independent, so devoted to their work, and of such a 
virile Americanism. They are not leaders of thought and 
public opinion, but its moulders in a much more effective sense 
than any other agency, even the mighty fourth estate. They 
have the first and the best chance at the citizen-to-be. What 
manner and type of citizenship he shall display is theirs to 
say. Theirs is the bending of the twig that determines the tree's 
inclination. 



The Art of . 
Speaking Correctly. 



Most men and women of ordinary 
intelligence, education and experi- 
ence talk well enough sitting down. 
The average human can be wise, 
witty, amusing, even eloquent, when he talks to one or two, or 
to a little intimate group. Let him, however, be called upon to 
say that which is in him, speaking on his feet to any company, 
large or small, intimate or familiar, and the spectacle is calcu- 
lated to make his enemies rejoice. The wit goes out of him; 
his voice is alien and undependable; his knees shake and 
his thickened tongue cleaves to the roof of his mouth. Having 
said nothing, and said it vilely, he sits down, covered with 
humiliation and perspiration, but not less relieved than his 
hearers. 

All of which is because the most vital and important of 
human arts, the art of speaking, is the most neglected. Letter- 
writing, it has been said, is a vanished art save among the 
highly literate few. The art of conversation, too, has disap- 
peared with the salon, but none of these polite accomplish- 
ments to which our forebears paid so much attention has fallen 
into a more hopeless desuetude than that of trained, educated 
and practiced speaking in the public and social sense. The 
after-dinner speaker of the average civic or other functions is an 
after-dinner bore, not for lack of intelligence, but because he 
is utterly unskilled in delivery, is ill at ease, and is hampered 
and hobbled by knowledge of his deficiency. 

If the San Francisco school board acts as it should on the 
matter now before it, then we shall soon be in a way to procure 
better things in this regard for the rising generation. We shall 
teach them to speak their own thoughts and the noble thoughts 
of others with confidence instead of diffidence, with assurance of 
voice and manner, with agreeable certainty of voice control and 
modulation. By and by at dinner tables, banquets and any sort 



San Francisco News Letter 



July IS, 1911. 



of public meeting, those listening will silently vote their thanks 
to the school board that took away the terrors of such affairs by- 
teaching men and women how to speak. 

Nor is this a matter of mere polite accomplishment or of 
unproductive pleasure. It is related intimately to Government 
which is good or bad in proportion as the governed individual 
takes an interest and part in it or neglect it.' It is not enough 
that the individual shall sit in debate or at political gatherings 
and listen. If he has views that are sound or new or sugges- 
tive, he should give them expression. Happily, if he be modest 
and self-conscious, as the best men often are, he will hesitate to 
project himself into discussion because he knows the limitations 
of his ability publicly to express himself. The consequence is, 
that too frequently the noisy and vain and empty-headed, who 
are commonly untroubled by modesty, do the talking and shape 
the policies. Teach all educated men and women how to speak 
correctly, pleasingly and effectively, and the better element will 
have a better chance. 



Transcontinental 
Highway. 



There is a proposition before the 
United States Senate for a Govern- 
ment appropriation, to continue an- 
nually for five years, to better the 
condition of such public highways as are used by the Postoffice 
Department for rural mail service, but objections to an appro- 
priation of that nature have been made, and the objections are 
well taken. In a sense, at least, it would mean Government 
supervision of parts of a few public highways, which would not 
be desirable; it would mean repairing of certain portions, such 
as filling "chuck holes" and clearing away land-slides and the 
like, but nothing like permanent construction of roadway or 
bridge building would be undertaken; it might mean a conflict 
of authority between the national and State Governments; it 
might mean the beginning of an agitation of the economic 
"ism" of Government control of railways on the ground that if 
the Government finds it advantageous to control and keep in 
repair public highways for the benefit of mail carrying contrac- 
tors who employ their own vehicles and motor power, why not 
apply the same principle to the railways, and not only keep 
them in repair, but own their equipment? The transportation 
of all mail matter between the several postoffices is in the 
hands of private individuals, companies or corporations, and 
if it would be good political economy for the Government to 
keep the earth roads in good condition over which the vehicles 
of mail transporting travel, would it not be bad political econ- 
omy to thus officially discriminate between transporters of mail 
matter ? 

But there are enough Senators opposed to the proposition to 
keep the proposition, or bill, in the hands of the committee un- 
til it dies and is forgotten. There is, however, a good roads 
proposition, the outgrowth of the recent Interstate Good Roads 
Convention at Birmingham, Ala., which was composed of dele- 
gates from most of the States, good highway builders, engi- 
neers, dealers in and manufacturers of road materials, and 
manufacturers of motor vehicles. The proposition is almost 
dazzling in its magnitude, but it is altogether feasible. The idea 
is to construct a highway of macadam or other approved 
material between the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts, with Boston, 
New York City and Philadelphia for the initial points, and San 
Francisco the objective point of the enterprise. A stock com- 
pany is not contemplated, but an association more like the 
Panama-Pacific Fair and Exposition Company, which is and is 
not a business enterprise to which the directors or managers 
have no personal financial interest. The plan is, it is under- 
stood, for the organization to solicit a substantial annual Con- 
gressional appropriation until the highway is completed, and' 
also to solicit substantial aid from the States through which 



the highway shall pass, and ultimately have the Governors of 
the States in interest constitute the directory, with a Govern- 
ment army engineer as permanent president of the board. In 
the first instance, the enterprise, when once it assumes a tan- 
gible shape, will greatly stimulate good highway construction 
in all the States between the initial and destination points, and 
that the objective point for all good roads construction will be 
a connection with the transcontinental roadway. In no sense is 
it to be a toll highway, but it will be expected of every State 
directly in interest to keep the mileage in its territory in good 
repair, as directed by the Government engineer. As has already 
been stated, the project is the direct outcome of the Interstate 
or National Good Roads Convention recently held in Birming- 
ham, Ala. The weakest spot in the proposition is that a few of 
the promoters think that when completed it should be turned 
over to the Government as a national highway for vehicles and 
placed under the supervision of the Commerce Commission. 
To that, the States contributing to roads-construction would be 

likely to enter vigorous protests. 

■XT 

Congressman Humphrey, of Wash- 
How to Restore ington has introduced a bill in Con- 
Our Merchant Marine, gress to restore the American mer- 
chant marine to what it was before 
the Civil War, that is attracting not a little favorable com- 
ment from shipbuilders and ocean transportation companies. 
Of course, the Humphrey scheme provides for liberal subsidies, 
but in a way that is radically different from all other plans for 
subsidizing merchant ships, but it looks feasible, and is hav- 
ing favorable consideration in shipping circles. The amazing 
feature of Mr. Humphrey's theory is that subsidies liberal 
enough to assure the complete restoration of the American flag 
to first place on the seas of the globe would entail a less annual 
expense to the Government than the cost of constructing a first- 
class battleship. 

Mr. Humphrey employs the official reports of the Treasury 
Department to substantiate his claim, which is that the remis- 
sion of five per cent of the duties on articles of commerce 
brought to the ports of the United States from foreign coun- 
tries in American ships would provide ample subsidies, but it 
is the application of another paragraph of the measure from 
which he claims would result in giving the needed encourage- 
ment to American shipping. This paragraph provides for an 
ad valorem tax of two per cent on all goods brought into this 
country by ships flying the American flag, whether such goods 
are dutiable or are on the free list. This plan is considered the 
preferable one because it would not only not be burdensome, 
but would surely restore our American carrying commerce to 
what it was half a century ago. 



PIPER-HEIDSIECK 



CHAMPAGNE 

" Brut " and " 1904" 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

Agents Pacific Coast 
314 SACRAMENTO STREET San Francisco 



•July 15, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 




'om 







" I " ' mi 



1 am not averse to an occasional brief reminder that life 

is but a fleeting vapor, that all is vanity, and the grave an uni- 
versal heritage, but when the poet contributes the information 
in an effusion as long as your arm, beginning : 

"Did you ever think, as the hearse drove by, 
It wouldn't be long till you and I 
Would go riding out in the big, plumed hack, 
And never remember of coming back?" 

resignation takes wings, gloom assumes a joyful radiance, and 
death becomes merely the vengeful instrument of impatient 
rage. There should be a law to protect society from bombard- 
ment by such infernal missiles. The mails were never intended 
as mediums of such outrageous assault, and the creature who, 
from ambush, thus assails his fellows should be suppressed as 
a menace to reason and religion. 

Stretched above the ring of the recent Wolgast-Moran 

fight, in order to appear plainly in the moving pictures of the 
affair, was a mammoth insignia bearing the legend "1915- 
Frisco." This will be shown all over the world. For the out- 
rage, we are indebted not so much to the ignorant and brutal 
instigators of the game as to those whose duty it is to uphold 
the law by its enforcement. I reverently uncover to the super- 
nal audacity of the mind which tranquilly believes itself to 
have discovered the solution of the moral problem in its self- 
adopted system of permitting prize-fighting in San Francisco 
while loudly insisting upon conformity to a standard of de- 
cency by the deaf and dumb of Berkeley. When the Devil a 
monk would be, he cuts strange capers. There are some in- 
iquities that may be inquired into and punished without loss of 
political support, and prize-fighting is not one of them. 

To Enquirer. — The equality of the sexes is a question 

that must adjust itself. I am perfectly competent and willing 
to tackle the proposition, but the handsome and gentlemanly 
boss editor of this paper has forbidden me to dally with this 
particular means of enlightenment. I will, however, timidly 
venture the assertion that inequalities will always prevail be- 
tween the sexes. The wife of an author seldom cares to read 
what her husband writes, but the husband is compelled to eat 
what she cooks. 

In the East, everything appears to be either under or 

over-done. In May they were sitting on sheet-iron parlor stoves 
in search of warmth ; in July they are frying on the side-walks 
or baking on the roofs. Out here, sunshine and roses; perfumed 
breezes stir the billows over vast sea-fields of ripening corn, 
while the lap of nature is filled with luscious fruits. This is 
not brag, but an invitation to come West. 



We are told by a self-confessed authority that "a cap- 

ile and self-respecting police officer doesn't like to be crowded 
..:\d pushed to do his duty." My motive in quoting this is not 
i much to offer an endorsement of its truth, as to call atten- 
ion to the remarkable similarity in the feelings of the capable 
and self-respecting policeman and those of the ordinary lazy 
.:nd worthless variety, under like conditions. I have no desire 
to wound the delicate sensibilities of either class by encourag- 
ing interference by the head office, but I know of more than 
one otherwise good policeman who has lost ambition and his 
job through the non-interference of a sharp stick, vigorously 
wielded by his superiors in command. 

Even at this late date, a contemporary proudly boasts 

that it received the "Grand Prix" from the Paris International 
Exposition of 1900 for its exhibit of "Joarnaux et Publications 
periodiques americains." I confess myself a little hazy as to 
differing very radically from the "Grand Bounce," and, there- 
fore, extend tardy congratulations, accompanied by a hope that 
the purport of the "Grand Prix," but presume it to be something 
our contemporary may make good its threat to carry off similar 
honors from our own World's Fair in 1915, for I know the 
proprietor to be a worthy gentleman whose patriotism would not 
permit "americains" to be written otherwise than with a big 
capital "A" if within his power to prevent. 

At a banquet, thirty years ago, I remember a speaker to 

have likened the San Francisco press to a pack of little dogs — 
when any stir took place they all began to bark in unison. At 
that period, it might be said in their favor that they were all 
well-behaved little dogs not at all given to snarling and snap- 
ping at one another. Occasionally two might be observed to 
approach each other with dignified growl and tail erect, but 
the pack was seldom disgraced by the unseemly deportment of 
the mongrel cur. They may not have loved each other; there 
was an occasional Dark and bite, but never a yelp. The little 
doggies of the old days were quite too brave and well bred for 
that. 

Time writes no wrinkles on the brows of eminent men 

who pay to have their pictures printed. — It's no trouble to grin 
when you win; it is trying to grin when you lose that makes 
your jaws feel like the mumps.— The straight tip usually leads 
to a crooked deal. — The most convincing bluff is looking wise 
and keeping your mouth shut. — If you want to be a Rockefeller, 
oil up and keep going. — The man who takes an ell if given an 
inch will find an "h" added to his ell in the final windup. — An 
ounce of jolly is often worth a pound of serious argument. — 
If man knew "whence the wind," there would soon be a corner 
on blowing. 

A contemporary inquires: "Is our city to be again torn 

by factional strife?" No, darling. Recollection of days past 
wfien we put to sea in a stone boat, with iron oars, the wrath of 
God for a breeze and hell for a port, is yet too vivid for imme- 
diate recurrence of a like experience to be desired either by 
those who succeeded in swimming safely to shore, or by those 
who, still half-submerged in the flood, keep their heads above 
water by clinging with their teeth to the roots of the trees on 
the bank. No more gore, just at present, thank you. 















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San Francisco News Letter 



July 15, 1911. 




Exclusive society in Berkeley and about the bay is agog. 
Following in the footsteps of his big brother Ernest, young 
Henry Wrampelmeier went and did it. In short, Henry, twenty 
years old, Lochinvared with a fair bride of sixteen, a daughter 
of one of the proudest families of the University town, and was 
married in Redwood City, where other things have happened 
before, and where there is no law for speeding. From any 
point of view, the young man fulfilling his heart's desire, did 
well. The bride was Miss Patty Irving, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Washington Irving, and sweet as a honeysuckle or a sweet- 
pea blossom, they say. If we would admit the truth, not a 
man or woman amongst us who has not eloped but envies the 
young pair. No marriages are ever quite so happy as those 
that are the result of elopements, and in San Francisco and the 
bay cities the latter are becoming more and more the fashion. 
Indeed, the old-style wedding, with its floating vails, orange 
blossoms and seven-story cakes will soon be a thing of the past. 
The modern young man is in too much of a hurry for it. "Come 
to the Justice of the Peace," he says; and the lady, who much 
prefers to be a real bride than a figure on display, quickly ac- 
cepts the invitation. Since the ceremony never mattered much, 
it is just as well to get it over quickly. The savage was right, 
after all, as he has proved himself so in many other things. Let 
us consider some of the recent elopements in local society. But 
last Friday Miss Cressy Stone, of Napa, ran away with George 
Alfred Thompson. Emily Bowie, one February afternoon, 
quietly married young Stanley Rammage in a little Catholic 
church in the valley of San Rafael. Her brother repeated for 
the family but last week. Emily Wilson, not very long ago, took 
a flying trip to Martinez with Orville G. Pratt. Then there was 
Annie Wooster, who slipped away with young Frank Glass, 
son of the late Admiral Glass, to Redwood City, and turned the 
trick; Edna Davis, who deserted practice for the kirmess one 
stormy night to wed Stanley Moore ; Henrietta Alton, a rose of 
San Mateo, who fled to town one morning as early as seven 
o'clock with Arthur St. John Whitney; and Dorothy Bridge, 
who did as much for Izzy Wright. Other elopements that were 
breath-takers were those of Dolly McGavin and Douglas Frye ; 
Gertrude Perry and William E. Dassonville; Grace Madeline 
Powers and L. Seth Ulman. And so one might continue re- 
cording them to the end of this column. No wonder; it is the 
very best sport in the world. 

S S rs 

Honesty is not always the best policy, and there are occa- 
sions when a spade should be called a cheese scoop. 

On the staff of one of our conservative dailies there is a cor- 
respondent from one of the rabbit towns who has shown him- 
self not only a man of resourcefulness, but a bit of a wag as 
well. He was detailed on the local end of a murder case in his 
town recently, and in order to get his story, was obliged to set 
up drinks for the officials he was interviewing more than once. 
Being a perfectly honest man, he unburdened his soul on his 
expense account, and stated that he had purchased drinks with 
the money expended. 

Now the city editor was a conscientious person, and he forth- 
with carefully blue-lined each of the naughty items. 

"Tut! Tut!" said he, "this will never do." And he explained 
at great length to his modern edition of Diogenes that it was 



strictly against the policy of the paper to purchase liquor in any 
form. 

The reporter swallowed that which was in his throat several 
times, and then hit the high places for Rabbittown. The next 
week his expense account included the following : 

"To 11 orders of tea and cakes, $1.85. N. B. — I have been 
giving several tea parties during the past week." 

The account was passed without a murmur. 
5 5 5 

Sometimes the things that happen at the Bohemian Club get 
into print and sometimes they do not. The Bohemians are Owls 
in more ways than one. Cosmopolitan in their representation, 
they are adepts in most of the tricks of all trades. Some of the 
trades it would be superfluous to mention. It is sufficient that 
the Transportation Club has always been jealous of them, 
though the latter themselves have hardly a reputation for slow- 
ness. Enjoying but a few days ago an excursion on the Ocean 
Shore Railroad through courtesy of General Manager L. H. 
Landis, how could they? On the Ocean Shore, one is always 
going some — beach time, if you understand. It was a bully 
outing, and there were many to enjoy it. James G. Melvin, 
who was chairman of the occasion, was at his best, but for one 
thing. In abstracted moments, he fingered a morning newspaper 
frowningly for a certain story of the Bohemian Club, which 
evidently had not appeared. It would have been such a joke on 
one of Melvin's friends that it was something of a tragedy that 
it had been omitted. Noticing the chairman's abstraction in 
the matter, S. M. Tate asked him what he was searching for. 

"A story of the Bohemian Club," replied Melvin, "and I can- 
not find it anywhere." 

"If it is a Bohemian Club story," suggested Tate, "it would 
naturally be under 'Births, Deaths, Engagements and Marriages, 
wouldn't it?" 

W S S 

Sylvest, who, while he is not thinking on economic prob- 
lems, repairs typewriters, would burst into fame. And it is a 
rare, good name he bears, too — O'Sullivan. Sylvest has recently 
expressed himself in the daily press in criticism of the Reverend 
William Rader. That gentleman, it appears, had the courage 
to preach a sermon on "The Man Out of a Job," in which he 
spoke a trifle truthfully of the labor unions. Then, he also com- 
mitted the sin of patronizing a boycotted grocery. Such things 




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July 15, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



may be permitted in Heaven, but not in San Francisco. Rising 
in plebeian wrath, Sylvest bludgeoned the minister in the first 
morning newspaper that would listen to him and advertise his 
business. The typewriter game is a hard one in this city, any- 
way. The reasons that Sylvest brought to bear were principally 
hysterical and arithmetical. If it should ever come to that day 
when every one worked but father, it would be the unions that 
would bring it about. The idea was simply to reduce the num- 
ber of working hours. But did not Sylvest, in the working out 
of his paradise, stop rather too soon. The Lookeron begs to 
nudge the funny bone which evidently he does not possess. By 
reducing the hours of labor till the unions worked not at all — 
would not such be the perfect fruition of Sylvest's hilarious 
plan? And is it not too bad the gentleman did not prove 
himself a genius by thinking of it. Union labor, which rarely 
thinks, might have statued him to all posterity. 

Syl may write another letter to the press later on. In the 
meantime, all success to the minister with the courage to criti- 
cise the unions wherein they are wrong, and patronize a boy- 
cotted grocery. 

S 5 S 

While Ned Greenway's trip to Europe developed in him a 
certain "chestiness," not quite becoming to his already embon- 
point figure, he has recently made some amends by approving 
the Texas Tommy Swing. He insists not only on its grace, but 
its lack of suggestiveness. And in the same breath he condemns 
the turkey trot, that won the heart of Pavlowa, as being a sis- 
ter or sweetheart, of the indecent loving two-step. Being a fat 
man, and having tried out the different brands of hopping, Ned 
speaks with authority. When, indeed, has he not spoken so. And 
his dictum has put the damper on more than one social aspira- 
tion that would have gladly developed a taste for his wine. 

In the same manner is Ned in earnest about the Texas 
Tommy, from which it is certain that the T. T. has a social 
future before it in San Francisco. Why the turkey trot should 
not have got on, too, is a poser. But Ned always had his pre- 
judices. It seems that before deciding on a new dance he tries 
it out with one certain young lady. In secret confidence, the 
young lady told a friend the other day why his Czarship did 
not like the trot. 

"You see," she said, "the turkey trot requires a close em- 
brace, and though Mr. Greenway, under ordinary conditions, 
might like it all the better for that reason, he finds it impossible, 
having grown stout, to meet the requirements of the dance 
without appearing ridiculous." 

S S V 

Baseball of recent days has become 

vitriolic. Breathe the word, and even 

the most moderate fan will jump to his 

teet and commit a war-dance. He is not 

to blame — i* is the Seals. What the Ver- 
non Tigers did to them is enough to break 

the heart of a whale. Some fans are 

only small fry. A great many, indeed, 

in view of recent occurrences, are begin- 
ning to look upon themselves as suckers. 

On the other hand, Happy Hogan feels 

like a shark. Leading the Vernons, 

Happy has gobbled game after game 

from the Seals much much like a nigger 

sucks eggs. Nor does Happy see any 

reason why he should not keep on doing 

so, making an all-round job of it. Oak- 

land, Sacramento, the Angels, what do 

they matter with the Tigers on the job. 

And it looks quite as bad as Happy's 

happiness makes it out to be. The Seals 



are beginning to take on a scared, rattish look. With a bunch 
of the right sort of feminines to hand, they might disappear al- 
together. Two or three of them who are Irish, or think they are, 
dropped over to the Columbia the other night to see Chauncey 
Olcott in an attempt at cheering up. But while Chauncey did 
his part, the green turned blue before they had reached the 
first corner coming out. And it was against the rules to take a 
Irink. Berry, the catcher, swore redly. 

"It looks," he said, "as though Vernon had opened the en- 
velope and pulled out ( he championship." 

"No," corrected Shaw; "they are Sealing it, instead." 
cT tt S 

The other day, Judge Shortall married a deaf and dumb cou- 
ple. For the first time in his life the Judge felt as though he 
had been at a real wedding. It would be rather impossible for 
the two intelligibly to quarrel themselves into a divorce. The 
Judge kissed the bride, who seemed to like it. At any rate, 
she didn't say anything. John Green, sergeant of police, who 
interpreted, looked jealous. She was really pretty, and she 
knew how to be kissed. Every girl does not. In telling of the 
wedding that afternoon at the club, Shortall recalled another 
incident of a deaf and dumb couple — beggars, who held a coign 
of vantage on Market street. Returning home in a charitable 
mood one day, Shortall dropped a five-dollar gold piece into 
the beggar's cup. But the Judge wanted to be sure that his gift 
was well bestowed. So, with a sudden startling action that 
would have been apt to animate a stone, he bent and called in 
the fellow's ear : 

"Are you really deaf ? Hey! Are you really deaf ?" 

The beggar put his hand to the organ, rubbing it grievously : 

"No," he replied, "I am the one that's dumb." 
S ?r v 

President C. C. Moore, of the Panama-Pacific Exposition 
Company, was one of the speakers at the reception tendered the 
National Educational Association in the Greek Theatre last 
Monday. Be it known that he is quite an orator, as he has been 
a credit to the great enterprise which he and his fellows have 
in hand. Along with his great industry, he possesses a sense 
of humor that would carry him easily over greater stupendities 
than an N. E. A. gathering. Unable to take himself so seri- 
iously as the average school teacher, he gets along in the world 
fairly well, nevertheless. At the present time he is as much in 
request as the President of the United States. Perhaps, con- 
sidering everything, and that this is San Francisco, he is quite 
as important a figure, too. The site question, at any rate, is not 
any less difficult to handle than a Senate. But the tact and en- 



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:li them — you'll find the differ- 
ence is in the bulk, not the weight. 
1ARLINE IS CON( 



TRATED SOAP POWDER- 



THESE BIG PACKAGES AREI 



FLUFFED SOAP POWDERS. 



PEARLINE IS BEST AND, 



1 CHEAPEST 



3 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 15, 1911. 



ergy of C. C. Moore will carry him through. He was telling a 
group of his Exposition fellows the other day of the first speech 
he ever made. It was at a political meeting of uneasy temper. 
When it was over, a group of hoodlums in the back of the hall, 
whom he least expected to enthuse, began calling what sounded 
to him like : 

"More, more; let us have more, more!" 

Consequently he got up and spoke for another five minutes, 
but evidently could not satisfy the demand, for when he finished 
the calls were even louder than before. A friend explained it 
to him afterwards. 

Instead of encoring him, the low-brow element had been de- 
sirous of lynching him. They had been yelling : 

"Moore, Moore — let us get Moore, Moore!" 
5 s ~S 

The transcontinental stunt is becoming popular with local 
motorists. Numerous motorcar owners of San Francisco have 
decided to ma^e the trip, and Dr. C. F. Ford, in his six-cylinder 
machine, and accompanied by his wife, is already en route to 
New York. The doctor will drive the car himself. The route 
is via Stockton, Sacramento, Lake Tahoe, over the mountains 
to Reno, then Salt Lake. From Salt Lake they will go to Den- 
ver and Kansas City, Chicago, and on to New York. They will 
return by the southern route, which is a very difficult one. The 
trip will be done leisurely, so that nothing of interest will be 
missed. It is a way of seeing this United States that is highly 
gratifying and educational. E. P. Brinegar, the automobile man, 
fancied at first that Ford was going to make a hurry-up journey 
of it. So he asked him what time he expected to do it in. Ford 
explained that he was not bent on speed, but wished to see the 
country. Then he called on the automobile man's experience in 
such matters to answer the following question : 

"Do you think," he inquired, "that if one were really trying, 
he could make the trip from San Francisco to New York as 
quickly as from New York to San Francisco ?" 

"By no means." replied Brinegar. "Coming to San Francisco 
you would know what a good thing waited on you." 
b" s S 

Paul Shoup, vice-president in charge of all the electric roads 
of the Southern Pacific Company in Southern California, is at 
the Palace. In his happiest days, Paul used to live in San 
Francisco and write short stories for the magazines — that is, 
stories the editors really bought and paid for. This is but an- 
other way of saying that he is clever. The brains that go into 
short-story writing these days might well manage half a dozen 
railroads. Consequently, Paul Shoup decided that railroading 
was an easier game. Besides, he was always sure of his check. 
In some respects, literature is rather uncertain. But it has its 
halo, and it is to his fling at the profession that his friends in 
greeting Shoup and recalling old times always refer. Ever a 
favorite, they are looking him up in hosts these days at his 
hotel quarters. 

"But I say," said one of them, turning abruptly from a busi- 
ness subject, "what about your writing now? Have you 
dropped fiction altogether ?" 

Shoup smiled. "No, not quite," he responded. "I sometimes 
drop in and help them out in the advertising department." 



The evidence of how seriously this paper is handicapped 

by its lack of italics is never so glaringly apparent as when I 
am reading the editorial page of the Sunday Examiner. 



California's most famous wines are those produced by 

the Italian-Swiss Colony. Ask for them. 



CANDY FOR HER VACATION. 

It will add to the pleasure of her stay in the country. Can be 
express from any one of Geo. Haas & Sons' four candy stores: Phelan 
Building; Fillmore at Ellis; Van Xc-ss at Sutler; and 28 Market 
near ferry. 




You may talk about your pet 
brands but right here is where 
you can start your tobacco 
education — where you can 
learn what a real smoke is. 

PHILIP MORRIS 

ENGLISH , n , Dl 
MIXTURE and tUt rlUg 

$2.00 the pound in 25c, 50c, 
and $1.00 tins. If your dealer 
doesn't stock these brands 
send us his name and address 
with 25c for trial tin of Eng- 
lish Mixture or Cut Plug. 

PHILIP MORRIS & CO., Ltd. 
402 West Broadway. New York City 



DEWAR SCOTCH 

WHISKY 

has the unique distinction of holding 
the Royal Warrant in Three Reigns 




of 
Queen Victoria, King Edward, and King George 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

SHERWOOD and SHERWOOD 

Portland San Francisco Los Angeles 



A SKIN Of BEAUTY IS A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER 

Removes Tin, Pimples. Frecldes. Moth - Palcnea, 
Rash tod Skin Diseases, and every blemish on 
beauty, and defies detection. Il hat Hood (he leal 
of 64 yean; no other has, and it to harmless we 
taste it to be sure il is properly made. Accept no 
counterfeit of similar name. The distinguished Dr. 
L. A. Sayresaid to a lady of the bant - ton (a patient): 
"A» yen ladies will ate them, I recommend Con- 
rand's Cream' at the leut harmful of all tac Skis 
prtparatlont." . 

For sale by all Druggists and Fancy Goods Dealers. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET POWDER 

For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritation*, cures Sun- 
bum and renders an excellent complexion. Price- 25 Cents, by Mail. 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 

Removes Superfluous Hair. f Price J 1.00. by mail 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Propr, il Creat Jones St.. New York Cny. 







July 15. 1911. 



and California \dvertiser 




PLMME'SliND 



TO, Jp*.mmSU J & t **,'-X./l~i 




Chauncey Olcott at the Columbia. 

It is indeed away from the set and conventional order of 
things to go to our representative theatre and see one of the 
old-time Irish plays, the kind that gladdened our hearts in our 
boyhood days. There is still the same type of villain, usually 
an English nobleman, and his villainous assistant: in fact, all 
the old, familiar figures wander through the four acts. Except- 
ing Andrew Mack, there is no one besides Chauncey Olcott to 
uphold this form of the drama. I am not surprised to see the 
actual enthusiasm with which the play is received nightly. Per- 
haps it is hailed as a blessed relief after the flood of imported 
plays and musical comedies which we have had for so long; at 
all events, speaking for myself, I found that I enjoyed every 
minute of the evening. Rida Johnson Young, who wrote the 
play for Mr. Olcott, is an experienced playwright, and has 
several successes to her credit. She has shown judgment and 
sense in her construction of the play. She has made no de- 
parture from the old order of things, but has given us a plain, 
unvarnished tale, which is clean and sweet, and around which 
no social problem is woven. 

It is the story of the love of an Irish lad and lassie, in which 
horse racing plays a prominent part; in fact, "Macushla," the 
title of the play, is the name of the horse which brings fame 
and glory for the house of Fitzgerald, and incidentally aids in 
foiling the plans of Warren Fairchild, who has designs on the 
sweetheart and fortune of the aforesaid Fitzgerald. The action, 
as in all such plays, is necessarily stereotyped, but it succeeds 
admirably in holding the attention, and aided by the effective 
work of the star and a capable company and a very pretentious 
production, makes capital entertainment. Olcott, who has not 
appeared here for some seven years, received a true California 
welcome. Some importance was attached to the play, inas- 
much as this was the initial performance, barring a single per- 
formance at Monterey, so we really had a real, original com- 
pany and production. Mr. Olcott wisely secured the services 
of Henry Miller to stage the play, and everybody knows what 
a capable director Mr. Miller is, the result being a performance 
which moved as smoothly as could be desired. 

Olcott still retains his charm of manner, and invests his work 
with spirit and animation, and he knows how to make love like 
a real Irishman. While not a great singer, Olcott has a way of 
singing which reaches his people. Of his four songs there is 
one which has a lilting refrain, which everybody is humming or 
whistling on leaving the theatre. It is called "The Girl I'll 
Call My Sweetheart Must Look Like You." Another, "Good- 
bye, My Emerald Land," is also unusually musical. The com- 
pany supporting Mr. Olcott is on the whole rather capable, 
though not startling. His leading lady is a very pretty woman 
who carries around with her the name of Gail Kane. If looks 
would make a good actress, she would certainly be a winner. 
As it is at present, her principal asset is her looks. As an ac- 
tress, she has much to learn. Charles Wellesly as the arch vil- 
lain, and E. H. Reardon are good enough to bring out the hisses, 
Reardon in particular being very effective. Robert V. Fergu- 
son, who made a big impression here some years ago with Mrs. 
Fiske, gives a splendid impersonation of a Scotch character, 
and he is sensible enough not to make the character too broad. 
He furnishes much of the comedy of the play. George Bren- 
nan, as Dinny O'Mara, should also be credited with a good per- 
formance. Next to the star, I should give the greatest credit 
to Jennie Lamont, who, as Mrs. Boyer, was simply immense. 
The simplicity of her characterization and her sensible and keen 
Irish wit made a decided impression. Katherine Clarendon and 
Alice Farrell were capable in other roles. As stated, the mount- 
ing of the play left nothing to be desired. Olcott will not alon 
draw the Irish element to the Columbia. The play is not 
great play, but the charm of it all is so refreshing that it c 
be thoroughly enjoyed by everybody, even the captious critic, 











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The Lorch family, who will appear this Sunday matinee at 
the Orpheum. 

"The Merchant of Venice" at the Alcazar. 

It is certainly a gallant attempt and a daring effort that the 
Alcazar organization is making this week to play Shakespeare, 
aided, of course, by Mr. Roberts and Mr. Bergen and Miss 
Roberts. It is no child's play to attempt an adequate and satis- 
factory performance with less than a week of preparation and 
with actors who are not Shakespearean readers. In the matter 
of production, the affair can be called a success, but from the 
standpoint of a real Shakespearean performance I could in truth 
not say as much. The way the play was slashed and cut to 
suit the needs and demands of the occasion, I verily believe 
somebody is liable to be indicted for manslaughter. In the way 
of arrangements of scenes and the changing and revision of the 
text, the innovations are indeed both daring and surprising. 
I believe from what M-\ Roberts tells me, that he is responsible 
for the version being used. It is on the whole not a bad ar- 
rangement, and admits of all the important scenes being used, 
and some that are not as important; in this connection, the 
scene with the Prince of Morocco and the Prince of Arragon be- 
ing entirely unnecessary. 

In playing Shakespeare the public should be considered, and 
scenes eliminated which do not have any direct bearing on the 
action and plot. I was distressed at times during the play when 
the audience, or rather many of them, saw fit to laugh and 
snicker at lines which they did not understand. To many regu- 
lar Alcazarans, Shakespeare is about as foreign to them as San- 
skrit, but I noticed quite a sprinkling of people armed with 
their Shakespeare closely following as best they could the re- 
arrangements of the scenes. I came prepared to discover a new 
Shylock in the person of Mr. Roberts, of whose performance of 
the role I had heard much. He did not quite give us a new Shy- 
lock, but rather clung to tradition in his conception of the role. 
He brought out vividly the dignity of the man and the suffer- 
ings and tolerance of his race. He made him a vital human fig- 
ure, with a wonderful depth of feeling, but who had borne with 
lamb-like resignation the persecution of his people, though 
strong in the realization of the wonderful history of Israel, yet 
rising with lion-like ferocity when the sanctity of his home is 
invaded by his enemies. It is not the loss of his ducats he 
cares for, but the ingratitude of his daughter and the loss of 
her love. He apparently loses all his reasoning powers after- 
wards in his sole thought for revenge, and his desperate resolve 
to exact his pound of flesh is the long-suffering cry of his race 
against the many wrongs heaped on them. There is nothing 
rapacious about the man in his first dealings regarding the loan 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 15, 1911. 



of three thousand ducats to Antonio. It is purely a business 
proposition, and Roberts makes it appear so. He softens the 
character wonderfully, and makes him at all times human. In 
his first scene, his soliloquies are made into scenes with his 
friends, and he confers with them in pantomime the advisability 
whether or not he should make the loan. It is the first time I 
have seen it done this way. In his big scene beginning with 
"to bait fish withal," he rose to moments of real greatness. He 
read the great lines with splendid intelligence and appreciation, 
showing that he has given the role much thought and study. It 
is not the thought of his ducats, but his daughter, which crazes 
him, and his one thought is for revenge. His idea of the ter- 
mination of the scene I did not like, as he built up the scene to 
a big climax and then allows it to fizzle to a rather tame end. 

The scene, however, as done by Mr. Roberts was a masterly 
piece of art, and I was prepared to see a great Shylock in the 
trial scene. In this, however, I was sadly disappointed, the 
characterization seeming not to ring true in this act, and many 
important "bits of business" were omitted which are essential 
to the character. Mr. Roberts accomplished the least in this- 
scene, which should have been the consummation of the charac- 
terization. I was sorely disappointed, as there is so much op- 
portunity for the finer shades of his art of which Mr. Roberts 
understands so much. On the whole, however, I was satisfied 
— as a character of such scope needs time and much thought 
and many opportunities to bring out all the little details which 
go to round out a character of such dimensions. Outside of 
Mr. Roberts, there was not really one Shakespearean reader in 
the entire cast. Mr. Bergen gave a conscientious reading of 
Bassanio, but it seemed rather stilted at times. Mr. Bergen 
showed clearly that he is not a Shakespearean reader, but he is 
always a good actor. 

I have always maintained that the average actor cannot read 
Shakespeare, and I am more than ever firmly convinced of the 
fact. Mr. Sothern and Miss Marlowe in their large company 
had, in the person of Mr. Buckstone, one real Shakespearean 
actor. The others gave intelligent readings to the best of their 
ability, and this is what the Alcazar organization do this week. 
Miss Roberts cannot play Portia. The role is not suited to her, 
though in the casket scene she surprised me much. She read 
the lines with unusual intelligence, and her comedy was deli-' 
cious. She failed lamentably, however, in the trial scene, and 
some of her important speeches, notably the "quality of mercy" 
speech she positively slurred, and read without any significance, 
and not once did she rise to the exigencies of the occasion. In 
her last act, again, she was better. Of the individual perform- 
ances of the members of the company I should select Mr. Ben- 
nison and Mr. Belasco as the best. As Antonio, Mr. Bennison 
gave a very dignified reading of the part, which to me seemed 
the nearest approach to real Shakespeare of any of the mem- 
bers of the regular cast. Walter Belasco did Old Gobbo well, 
his make-up being great. I was disappointed with the Gratiano 
of Mr. Gunn. It missed fire altogether. His fine speech, "Let 
me play the fool," was poorly done. Mr. Gunn looked hand- 
some, and no doubt gave the best there was in him. Gratiano 
is the Mercutio of the play. Gunn should have been cast for 
Lorenzo. Edward Warner neither looked the role nor played it. 
He was miscast. Dillon and Clements, as Salarino and Solanio, 
seemed out of their element in Shakespeare. 

Fred Wilson, as the Prince of Morocco, gave an indifferent 
reading of the part, and his assumption of the Duke of Venice 
was very poor. Sosso, as the Prince of Arragon, was much bet- 
ter. A frightful make-up deterred David Kirkland from giving 
a fair performance of Tubal. From the front of the house he 
looked like a clown. Wesner was satisfactory as young Gobbo, 
and gave us practically all the traditional business of the role. 
Miss Smyths, as Nerissa, was fair, and Viola Leach looked 
stunning as Jessica, though she showed she is not a Shakespear- 
ean reader, and besides her evident self-consciousness, she 
slurred her lines aggravatingly. The production as staged by 
the Alcazar management was almost beyond belief. The work- 
ing force of the theatre deserves much credit in this respect. 
The play was mounted almost lavishly. As I have already 
stated, it was a gallar.t attempt to do Shakespeare, and due 
credit should be given for splendid efforts and real, conscien- 
tious endeavor. 



Al. Jolson a Hit at the Orpheum. 

Al. Jolson is the one best bet at the Orpheum this week. 
Jolson is inimitable in his songs and jokes. He is without ques- 
tion the greatest star in his line, and should be retained for a 
longer period, if such a proposition be possible. Every man, 
woman and child in the audience is kept in one continuous roar 
of laughter from the moment he appears on the stage until he 
makes his final exit. He talked confidentially with the audi- 
ence, sang a ragtime song, tapered off with a whistling act — 
that is where he takes off his gloves and shows his white hands 
— and was finally induced to sing his song about the "Many 
Bad Cops Asleep on the Beat." He is here for only a week, 
but he is going to have a hard time breaking away if the de- 
mand of the Orpheum patrons has any influence with the man- 
agement. While it is quite true that his entertainment is much 
the same as he has always done, nevertheless everybody en- 
joys all that he says and does. 

Emma Dunn, who appears in John Stokes' playlet, "The 
Baby," is also well received. Her role is that of a German im- 
migrant whose husband has left her. She takes her baby to a 
foundling asylum in New York, and afterwards tries in vain to 
reclaim it. The anguish of the mother is very short, but very 
vivid. The finale is happily and dramatically brought about. 
The character is one of the very best Miss Dunn has ever had, 
and is enabling her to make one of the greatest hits of a bril- 
liant career. Her supporting company is very good, and the 
sketch is one of the most sterling in vaudeville. 

The Charles Ahearn Cycling Comedians give a novel and 
laughable entertainment with the aid of freakish bicycles. The 
best part of this act is the finale, in which Mr. Ahearn "races a 
mile in 13 seconds" on a funny-looking wheel. 

The hold-overs are also popular this week. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Chauncey Olcott will continue next week at the Columbia in 
"Macushla." Beginning Sunday night, July 23d, Henry Miller 
will present "The Havoc." 

In "The Havoc," Mr. Miller returns to the field of big, seri- 
ous drama, with which the playgoers of this city have learned 
to identify his name. 

* * * 

For the final week of the Roberts-Bergen-Roberts season at 
the Alcazar, commencing next Monday night, an elaborate re- 



Columbia Theatre 

Gott'ob, Marx & Co., Managers. 



Corner Geary and Mason Sts. 
Phones Franklin 160. 
Home C 6783. 



Second and last week begins Sunday night, July 16th, Uatlnees 
Wednesday and Saturday. Augustus Prtou presents 

CHAUNCEY OLCOTT, 

hi ii is new piny, ■MA.CUSHLA." 
Prices— $1.60, $1. ''■■ 50c, and 26c. 

Coming— HENRT MILLER In Till': HAVOC. 

New Orpheum &w k « a ««* 

Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre In America. 

Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

THE STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE. 

THE LORCH FAMILY, a thrilling combination of dancing, acro- 
batics and Rlsley; GERALD GRIFFIN & CO., In BdWard Owing 

Towne's Tabiold Versi if "Other People's M y," "GENERAL" 

BDWARD LAVTNE; CLIFFORD WALKER; THE THREE VA- 
GRANTS; WILLA HOLT WAKEFIELD; CHARLES AHEARN CY- 
CLING COMEDIANS; NEW DAYLIGHT MOTION PICTURES. 
i-'-i week "i EMMA DUNN In John Stokes' playlet, "THE BABY." 
Evening prices, 10c, 26c, 60c, 76c. Bon seats II. Matinee prices 
rexcep.1 Sundays and holidays), LOc 26c, 50c Phones Douglas 70; 
Home C L670. 

Alcazar Theatre &5eM«riI 

Monday evening, July 17th. and tin ghout the week. Farewell 

mpearances of FLORENCE ROBERTS, THURLOW BERGEN, 
THEODORE ROBERTS, In an elaborate revll 



' tfighl to Jl; matinee, 26c. to SO'e, Matinee Saturday 

and Sunday. Seats on sale ;it box-offlce and Emporium. 



















TRINITY 


SCHOOL 










Accredited to th 


e Universities 














Studies 


will be resumed 


August 1, 


1911 




846 Stanyan St.. 


San Francisco 


LEONS. 


ROGER, B. S.. Principal 





July 15, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



vival of "Sapho" is announced, with Miss Roberts in the title 
role, Mr. Bergen as Jean Gaussin, Mr. Roberts as Uncle Cesare 
and the stock players completing the cast. It was in response 
to insistent public demand that Belasco & Meyer decided to re- 
vive this play, which was the medium of one of Miss Roberts' 
memorable hits when she headed the old Alcazar company. 

* * * 

The Orpheum bill for next week will be rich in novelty and 
variety. Five of the acts will be entirely new. 

Previous to their engagement in this country with the Ring- 
ling Brothers' Circus, the Lorch family, who will be the head- 
line attraction, won fame as one of the most wonderful com- 
panies in the British Isles. In addition to their feats of strength, 
acrobatics, Risley and dancing, they introduce two ponies and a 
donkey as instances of their skill in animal training. 

Gerald Griffin, a famous Eastern character actor, will pre- 
sent a tabloid version of Edward Owing Towne's comedy, 
"Other People's Money." Mr. Griffin will have most capable 
support in Mary Condon, Beatrice Belmont and Francis Fay. 

"General" Edward Lavine, "The Man Who Has Soldiered 
All His Life," is sure to be a great comedy hit. Lavine per- 
forms some remarkable tricks in juggling. 

Clifford Walker, a famous English monologist, will also be 
included in the attractions of next week. 

The Three Vagrants. Merry Singers and Musicians, attired in 
the garb of street musicians, will also be introduced. 

Next week will be the last of Willa Holt Wakefield; the 
Charles Abeam Cycling Troupe, and also of the gifted actress, 
Emma Dunn, in John Stokes' human little play, "The Baby." 



SOCIALISM RAMPANT. 

McDevitt, who is the Socialist candidate for Mayor, at the 
coming primaries, insists that the only way to place the real 
workingman in power is to elect his ticket and to exclude the 
Labor Party ticket and that of the. Municipal Conference. 

It is reported that McDevitt states only a militant labor party 
of socialistic convictions may succeed where the McCarthy 
labor trust and monopoly finds it hard to make way against 
the honest labor revolt against Diaz methods. 

The Labor Clarion, which is the more conservative of the 
labor press, shows up the feeling against the McCarthy-Tveit- 
moe politics by justly calling attention to the fact that the time 
is over when a laboring man may be scared into line to vote for 
a yellow dog by threatening to call him a Citizens' Alliance 
ally. It is very doubtful whether the Clarion controls anything 
more than the Clarion in labor circles. The other element, the 
more rabid, is more numerous and is using the old trickery to 
keep the labor element in line, and is running about tagging 
people as belonging to the Citizens' Alliance with a fervor that 
would make the Alliance management swell with pride at such 
a stupendous increase in membership. To the intelligent, this 
is stuff and nonsense, but to the unintelligent and gullible vic- 
tims of the labor trust this appeal is an incense to the nostrils 
and food to the belly, and so the class cry is in full swing by 
the McCarthyites, all efforts of the Labor Clarion to the con- 
trary notwithstanding. 



VERY PROMISING. 



The editor took a new reporter on trial recently. He sent 
him to hunt for news, and after being away all day, he returned 
with the following, which he said was the best he could do : 

"Yesterday we saw a sight which froze our blood with horror. 
A cabman, driving down Market street at a rapid pace, was 
very near running over a nurse and two children. There would 
have been one of the most heart-rending catastrophes ever re- 
corded had not the nurse, with wonderful forethought, left the 
children at home before she went out, and providentially 
stepped into a near-by chemist's shop just before the cab 
passed. Then, too, the cabman, just before reaching the cross- 
ing, thought of something he had forgotten, and, turning about, 
drove in the opposite direction. Had it not been for this won- 
derful concurrence of favorable circumstances, a doting father, 
a loving mother and affectionate brothers and sisters woula 
have been plunged into the deepest woe and most unutterable 
funeral expense. It is'thus that we are even in life haunte i 
by death." 

The new reporter will be retained. 



LARGEST COAST OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

'WHERE QUALITY COSTS LITTLE' 

OAKI AND C0B ^KINGTON | COB MARKET c^r,,.™.,. 

vj«r\LMNL< im hosts., I „ d rouRTH srs SAN FRANCISCO. 



MEN'S AND BOYS* CLOTHING 

MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS 

WOMEN'S AND MISSES' COATS, 

SUITS AND MILLINERY 



See evening and morning 
papers, and our Show 
windows for particulars of 
a GREAT SALE covering 
all Departments and featur- 
ing a world of desirable 
Merchandise in Ready - to- 
Wear Apparel for Men and 
Women. 

It's not just a little spasm — 
it's a really big trade event, 
in which we open up some 
of the New Fall lines, and 
start the Ball Rolling for 
Fall, and at which you can 
save a lot of money. 



MEN'S AND WOMEN'S SHOES 

CUSTOM TAILORING FOR MEN 

AND WOMEN 

MEN'S AND BOYS' HATS 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 15, 1911. 





0&BTX 



When San Francisco is in duty bound to put her best foot 
forward one realizes how well the club shoe fits that foot. This 
week the city has been officially offering hospitality to the 
N. E. A.'s, and it was a society woman, a member of the exclu- 
sive Burlingame set, who called my attention to the fact that 
in the larger sense the so-called smart set cannot be depended 
upon to do the social honors for the city. A few individuals 
may join in the general club movements, but take it by and 
large, society does not heip make vertebrate the theory that 
hospitality has more syllables in the West than anywhere else. 

"Why, I felt ashamed of myself," confessed this society 
woman to me, "when the other night we came across the bay, 
and as late as eleven o'clock found women at the ferry building 
distributing flowers, bunches of sweet peas, to the strangers en- 
tering our portals. We have quantities of sweet peas in bloom 
now; indeed, our gardens are very famous for them, but I had 
never thought of offering them to the hospitality committee." 

"Who does this sort of thing?" she asked her husband. 

"Oh, the clubwomen," he responded. "Why, that California 
Club is a more important factor in making this a convention 
city than any other organization. We can turn over a big end 
of the thing to them and know that it will be well done." 

The lady from the sacred inner circle was very much im- 
pressed, and I made bold to ask: "Doesn't your family own a 
large block of stock in this hotel?" 

"Yes," she acknowledged, and suddenly it dawned upon her 
why her husband was so well informed on conventions and the 
part women's clubs play in them. 

She dimly realized that besides working for pure milk and 
clean streets and sanitary sewerage and detention homes and 
juvenile courts and playgrounds, the clubwomen shoulder a lot 
of the responsibility of hospitality that pays dividends to a 
number of estates that are "very famous" for their flowers. 

Here endeth the first lesson. 

© © © 

The news that Ethel Barrymore Colt is going to divorce her 
husband does not surprise her friends here, who were given to 
understand that the rift had widened into a chasm. In fact, the 
actress told an interviewer that she would not be on the stage 
if she were not confronted v/ith the earn-your-own-living prob- 
lem, and as young Colt is supposed to have a cool million, with 
more millions cooling their heels for distribution, it was clear 
chat Miss Barrymore did not consider herself related to those 
millions. Her most intimate friends here are the Tobins, and 
the members of that family who are not assisting in the post- 
coronation festivities were the only ones taken into the con- 
fidence of the young actress who stood so long at the counter 
looking at the matrimonial pie, and when she did stick in her 
thumb she did not draw out a plum. 

However, her confidences here were not shared generally, 
and it was not until confirmation of the Los Angeles rumors 
were given out in New York that people began to exchange an- 
ecdotes of the Colt infelicity. At the Menlo Park Club, the 
other afternoon, a young chap told how Miss Barrymore had 
invited his sister and her husband to dine with her and meet 
Mr. Colt, who showed up very late for dinner, and in an ex- 
uberant mood that could not by any stretch of the imagination 
be called "good form." 

Before her engagement to young Colt, who is a couple of 
years her junior, Miss Barrymore was considered ideal soil in 
which to raise the proposal plant. She had been officially and 
unofficially engaged so many times that no one ever seriously 
considered matrimony in connection with her. Her first pro- 
fessional engagement was a thinking part with Sir Henry Irving 
in London, and possibly in order to have a speaking part she 
became engaged to marry young Irving. That entailed saying 
more than the one word "yes," for every woman qualifies that 
surrender with some conversation. However, Miss Barrymore 
changed her mind— she was just seventeen and fresh from the 
convent in Philadelphia, and of course she could not have been 



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expected to keep her mind made up one way. An interesting 
fact connected with that first London season was that Miss 
Barrymore made her home with Miss Hartman, a sister of one 
of our own institutions — Ferris Hartman. 

Of course, sympathy is entirely with Miss Barrymore. Like- 
wise there are sympathetic vibrations traveling towards a mem- 
ber of our own smart set who has also been married only a 
scant time, but if rumors are correct, is contemplating a 
divorce. Her family belongs to the Catholic church, and in- 
fluence is being brought to bear upon her resolve for a legal 
separation. 

© © © 

Pleasant to write of is the announcement that Miss Marie 
Louise Elkins, the granddaughter of Senator Charles Felton, 
is engaged to Christien de Guigne, Jr., who is a grandson of 
Mrs. Abbey Parrott. The news came in charming little notes 
mailed in Paris, where the bride-elect is visiting and whither 
her fiance is bound. This announcement has been a foregone 
conclusion ever since Miss Elkins made her bow to society here 
a year ago. De Guigne, who had been despaired of by the 
other debutantes as an incorrigible admirer of the French type, 
succumbed at once to Miss Elkins's charms. Both his sisters 
had married Frenchmen, one the Vicomte Helie d'Dampierre, 
and until Miss Elkins dazzled his vision it was supposed that 
this youth would live up to his father's predilections for the 
French. 

Cupid has had a lovely time in the Elkins family this year, 
Mrs. Elkins herself having first been officially counted a vic- 
tim. Her engagement to a Philadelphia clubman created a 
great deal more of a ripple of surprise than the daughter's an- 
nouncement. It was a matter of newspaper comment at the time 
that by marrying again she forfeited her share of the Elkins' 
fortune, but a family friend informs me that father-in-law 
Elkins never really gave her any of his millions, leaving them 
to the grandchildren instead. So Miss Elkins is an heiress as 
well as a charmingly pretty and accomplished young girl. It 
is hoped that the wedding will be celebrated at the Felton home 
at Menlo Park, but the present preferences of some of those 
concerned incline towards Paris. However, they will at least 
spend a part of every year out here, as is the custom of both 





JeISL 




'■^ 


pnnm 

f DUFF GORDON) 

iSHERRYJ 




The n 
Pacific Coast Ag 


lost celebrated brand in the 

ALEX D. SHAW & CO. 
snts 214 Front 


world 
St., San Francisco 



July 15, 1911. 



and Califoipl > Advertiser 



13 



families, which is a welcome prospect for their relatives and 
friends. 

6 8 9 
The Wednesday night hops at the Presidio are now in full 
swing, with most of the officers home from the Mexican border 
and as army men never scout along the frontier of the dance, bui 
go into it for all that it is worth, the crop of wall-flowers is al- 
ways short. The hop this week was largely attended by girls 
from town, who find added pleasure in the military dances when 
there is nothing of that sort on the town calendar. A number 
of informal dinners preceded the hop, and there was one rather 
formal dinner at which it had been surmised an engagement 
announcement would be made, but these surmises evidently 
were premature. 

© © © 

Miss Ethel Dean, who has just returned from a trip to the 
Orient, is the motif of a great deal of informal entertaining 
— for "Sweetie" Dean, as her intimates call her, is one of the 
most admired girls in the smart set. The sobriquet is the sugar- 
coated sort that does not in the least suggest her personality, 
which is not the sticky sort. But it was bestowed upon her in 
her pinafore days clung to her through her school days, and 
even stuck at Vassar, where there were enough San Francisco 
girls to thus softly impeach her personality. 

Miss Dean does not feel the call of town life very keenly, and 
with her sister, Mrs. Walter Magee, will spend the rest of the 
summer at the Dean ranch in Nevada, where Miss Ethel ha's 
her dog kennels and a long list of blue ribbon winners to their 
credit. She is a daring athlete only a degree less spectacular 
than Eleonora Sears, and therefore less heralded in the news- 
papers. Her friends consider it a great joke that the papers 
should have made a fuss over the fact that with Mrs. Kelland 
she climbed to the "crow's nest" on the Siberia on this last 
voyage from the Orient. To be sure, Captain Zeeder said that 
they were the coolest he ever had the honor to guide aloft, but 
the feat was child's play for a girl with the nerve and daring 
Miss Dean has shown in the genuine hair-breadth adventures to 
her credit, which range from going down into the ocean in a 
diving suit to breaking in wild horses at the Nevada ranch. 



CANDY SENT TO THE COUNTRY. 

A box of candy i* always welcomed bj friends in the country. Easily 

-sent by mail or express fr any <" i Geo. H&aa & Bona' r cand: 

stores: Phelan Building; Fillmore .11 Ellis; Van Ness it Sutter; and 28 
Market street, near Ferry. 



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gentlemen who wish it. No music. 
An artistic setting' for the best 
service that we can give. 
Geary Street entrance. 

Under the management of James Woods 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Sts.. San Francisco, California. 
High order hotel. Fine air. elevation, location. Five minutes 
from San Francisco's lively center. Well liked by ladles. 

American Plan $3.00 and up per day 

European Plan 11.60 and up per day 

THOS. H. SHEDDEN. Manager. 



PRESIDIO HEIGHTS 

DYEING and CLEANING WORKS 

3828 to 3836 CALIFORNIA STREET 

High Art Cleaners 

HENRY HICKMAN. Proprietor Phone Pscific loi 




Signorine Cannelinci and Giovannina Bianchi. 



CHRISTENING PARTY. 

On Sunday, June 18, 1911, a christening party, consisting of 
Signor Eugenio Bianchi, Jr., and Signora (Countess) Bianchi, 
his wife, whose second little daughter, Giovannina, was to be 
christened on that day, accompanied by relatives and friends 
proceeded to the church of Notre Dame des Victoires, on Bush 
street, where the ceremony was performed by the Reverend 
Fr. Joseph F. Sollier, the pastor and head of the Marist Fathers 
on this Coast. 

During the ceremony, Prof. B. Liebert rendered Gounod's 
"Ave Maria" on the violin in a masterful manner. 

A rich and elaborate dress and manteaux worn by the little 
Miss, made of imported Valenciennes lace and satin, attracted 
a great deal of comment and admiration. 

The young Miss, to whom was given the name of Giovannina 
Maria-de Campagna-Norma Bianchi, traces her ancestry to 
noble lineage through the two branches of her parents' families. 

On the father's side, an attorney practicing his profession in 
this city, who is the son of the late Signor Eugenio and Signora 
Giovannina-de Campagna-Bianchi, famous operatic artists, is 
the "Conti de Campagna" family, one of the most ancient and 
distinguished noble families of Verona. 

On the mother's side, the Gandolfos, a noble family of 
Genoa, numbering among its members an Embassador to France 
from his n?tion, an Archbishop, who presided over his See for 
many years, and many others distinguished in the paths of 
diplomacy, and the harsher one of arms. 



The Reverend Charles H. Spurgeon's keen wit was al- 
ways based on sterling common sense. One day he remarked 
to one of his sons: "Can you tell me the reason why the lions 
didn't eat Daniel?" "No, sir. Why was it?" "Because the 
most of him was backbone and the rest was grit." — Youth's 
Companion. 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 15, 1911. 



§®sM suai IP®ir§®ifii@iIl .tanns 

Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear in the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 

LA TOURETTE-STATITAKER.— The engagement is announced of Miss 

Marian La Tourette, of Philadelphia, and Paymaster Edward Stuart 

Statuaker, N. S. N. The wedding clay has been set for next March. 

WEDDINGS. 

HUNT-BAKER.— The wedding of Miss Natalie Hunt and Herhert Baker 

will take place at St. Luke's Church on August 9th. 
RODDA-MISTROT. — The wedding of Miss Ethel Anna Rodda and Lewis 
Mistrot of Texas took place on "Wednesday evening at St Luke's 
Church. 
WALTERS-WICKENDEN.— The wedding of Miss Rae Ona Walters, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George J. "Walters and Eric C. Wickenden, 
took place on Monday at the French Church Notre Dame des Victoires 
in Bush street. 

LUNCHEONS. 
MILLER. — Mrs. H. Clay Miller, Jr., was hostess at a luncheon on Sunday 
in her Sausalito home in honor of her sister. Miss Lisa Bohrman, who 
is visiting here for the summer. 
VON SCHROADER.— Mrs. Frederick von Schroader, wife of Colom-l Von 
Schroader, was hostess at a luncheon, followed by bridge, at the Pre- 
sidio recently. 

TEAS. 
McKINSTRY. — Mrs. E. W. McKinstry entertained at a tea recently in 
compliment to her mother, Mrs.M-Iedges, on the occasion of her 85th 
birthday. 
MORTON. — Mrs. Bowditch Morton was hostess at a tea on Wednesday in 

honor of her sister, Mrs. Bertschmann. of New York. 
RUCKER. — Mrs. J. T. Rucker entertained at a tea on Tuesday at her 
home on Gough street in honor of Mrs. Louis Bertschmann of New 
York. 

DINNERS. 
BARNESON. — Captain John Barneson gave a dinner in the red room of 
the Bohemian Club on Tuesday evening, when he entertained thirty 
guests. 
BLISS. — General and Mrs. Bliss entertained Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pixley 

informally at dinner at Fort Mason during their stay here. 
OLIVER. — Mr. and Mrs. Bartley Oliver entertained at an elaborate dinner 
Wednesday evening at their Broderick street residence in honor of 
Miss Estelle Fay. 

RECEPTIONS. 
YATES. — Frederick Yates, who recently returned to San Francisco from 
London, was host at an informal reception at the Bohemian Club on 
Monday evening. 

HOUSE PARTIES. 
HOLM. — Miss Hazel Holm entertained at a large house party over the 

week-end at her home in San Rafael. 
JOHNSON. — Miss Emily Johnson is giving a series of house parties at 

her home at Fort Bragg, where she is spending the summer. 
MORRISON. — The Misses Morrison of San Jose entertained at an elabo- 
rate house party at "Paradise," their country home, recently. 
MULLINS. — Mrs. George Carlton Mullins entertained a party of friends 

at her bungalow at Palo Alto over the week-end. 
STONE. — Miss Harriett Stone was hostess at a house party recently at 

the summer home of the Egbert Stones on the Russian River. 
WILSHIRE. — Miss Doris Wilshire entertained at a house party recently 
at her home in Mill Valley, in honor of Miss Natalie Hunt and her 
fiance, Herbert Baker. 

MOTORING. 
HAMMON. — Mr. and Mrs. Wendell P. Hammon and Mr, and Mrs. Scott 
Hendricks have returned from a delightful motor trip through the 
southern part of the State. 
HITCHCOCK.— Mr. and Mrs. William Greer Hitchcock will leave shortly 

for an automobile tour of Southern California. 
LAUMEISTER. — Miss Ethel Laumeistor, witli her brother Charles, left 

on Wednesday for a motor trip to Visalia. 
TOJETTI. — Mrs. Emilio Tojetti has returned from an extended automobile 

trip through Mendocino and other Northern counties. 
TUCKER.— Mrs. James Ellis Tucker, Mrs. James Potter Langhome and 
Mrs. E. P. Brinegar, have returned from a motor trip through Soi th- 
em California. 
WALLACE.— Bradley Wallace and Herbert Gould left on Monday for a 
motor trip through the southern part of the State. 

DEPARTURES. 
AVERY.— Mrs. Caroline Colt Avery left recently for the East to join her 

sister, Mrs. Alfred Ransome. 
BALDWIN.— Mrs. Lloyd Baldwin, Sr.. and her daughter, Mrs. Russell 

Selfridge, have left for a trip to the Yosemite, and expect to be away 

for several weeks. 
BROWN.— Mr. and Mrs. Caspar Brown have left for their new home at 

Worcester, Mass. 
BURKE.— Mr. Richard Burke, who has been the guest of his son and 

daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. William Burke, in San Mateo, will 

leave shortly for his home in Ireland. 
CLOMAN.— Major and Mrs. Sydney A. Cloman left yesterday for Fort 

Bragg, Mich. 
DE GUIGNE.— Christian de Guigne sailed on Tuesday from New York 

for France, where he will be the guest of his sister, Vicomtesse Phil- 
ippe de Tristan. 
DURKEE.— Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Durkee (Marian Lally) sailed recently 

on the Korea for Honolulu. 



FERGUSON. — Major Frank Ferguson will leave the first week of August 

for Washington, where he will be at the war college for a year. 
FERNANDEZ. — Mrs. Fernandez, wife of Senor J. M. Fernandez, will 

leave shortly for Panama, where she will join her husband. 
FRANKLIN.— Dr. and Mrs. Walter Scott Franklin have left for Lake 

Tahoe, where they will spend several weeks. 
GALLOIS. — Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Gallois and Miss Jeanne Gallois have 

left for a trip of several months through British Columbia. 
GREGORY. — Mrs. Susan Gregory and her granddaughter, Miss Sophia 

Comstock, left yesterday for a visit to Los Angeles and Santa Barbara. 
LANGHORNE. — Miss Jul ! a Langhorno will leave shortly for Colorado 

Springs, and from there will go to Cleveland, where she will be the 

guest of Miss Martha Calhoun. 
MAGEE. — Mrs. De Los Magee left on Monday for Los Angeles, and will 

spend about ten days in the southern part of the State. 
Mt-NUTT. — Mrs. Maxwell McNutt has gone to Aspen, Colo., to visit Mrs. 

David R. C. Brown at her summer home. 
MONSARRAT. — Mrs. Samuel Monsarrat and Mrs. Harvey Bassett leave 

for Santa Barbara next week, to be gone several weeks. 
PETERS. — Miss Anna Peters will leave on Monday for Monterey, where 

she will be the guest of friends. 
PIERCE. — Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus Pierce have left for Castle Crag, where 

they will remain for a fortnight. 
POTTER. — Mr. Edmund Everett Potter has left for his olive grove at 

Palermo, where he will remain a few weeks. 
POWELL. — Miss Jeanette Powell has returned to Marysville. after a 

brief visit in this city. 
ROEDEL. — Mrs. Philip Roedel and her daughter, Miss Clara Roedel, will 

leave shortly for a trip to British Columbia. 
TAYLOR. — The Misses Tillie and Laura Taylor left recently for New York 

and will sail for a lengthy tour abroad. 
TEYIS. — Mrs. William S. Tevis accompanied by her sons and Miss Lily 

O'Connor, have left for New York en route to Europe, whore they will 

spend six months. 
WILCUTT— Mr. and Mrs. George B. Willcutt will leave shortly for Lake 

Tahoe. 
WINSHIP.— Major Blanton Winship. who is visiting his brother. Emory 

Winship, in San Mateo, will leave shortly for his station In th^ East. 
WHEELER. — Mis. P. L. Wheeler, Miss Katherlne Wheeler and Kiikham 

Wheeler have gone to Dutch Flat, where they will remain for several 

weeks. 
CHENERY. — Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Chenery have gone down to Del 

Monte for the late summer, and expect to remain there for several 

weeks. 

ARRIVALS. 

A1KINS. — Mr. and Mrs. Bronte M. Aikins have returned to their home in 
Pacific Avenue after spending a few days at Cazadero. 

AVENALI. — Mr. and Mr?. Lorenzo Avenall have returned from a visit 
to the Josselyn Place at Woodside. 

BAGGETT.— Mrs, W. T. Baggett and Miss Baggett have returned to the 
Kenilworth after several month?' absence in the East. 

BREWER. — Miss Marie Brewer has returned from Carmel, and is estab- 
lished in her Mill Valley home for the summer. 

BROWN. — Spencer Brown, who has been spending the past few weeks at 
Del Monte, Monterey and Carmel, has returned to town. 

BUCKLEY. — Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Buckley, of Ireland, air guests :tt the St. 
Francis. 

CLEMENT. — Mrs. E. B. Clement has returned from Lake County, where 
she has been the guest of the Misses Collier at their country home. 

CLIFTON.— Captain Alfred Clifton, TJ. S. A., and Mrs. Clii have ar- 

' rived in San Francisco, and are being cordially greeted by their 
friends. 

CLARK. — Mr. and Mis. Albert Clark have returned from their honey- 
moon trip, and are established at their home in Berkeley. 

DORR. — Mr. and Mrs. L. K. lion- have returned from New York. 

DOUGLAS. — Mrs. Eugene Hale Douglas arrived recently from Manila, and 
is the guest of relatives in Oakland. 

DUNLAP. — Boutwell Dunlap has returned from a pleasant visit at Del 
Monte. 

FORDERER. — Mrs. George Fbrderer and Mrs. Elsie Knox Jennings have 
returned from a tour of Japan. 

FOSTER. — Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Foster, Miss Louisiana Foster. Miss Mar- 
tha Foster and Arthur Foster have returned from Cleveland, and are 
at their home in San Rafael. 

GREENWOOD. — Frederic Greenwood has returned from a visit with 
friends out of town, and is at the St. Francis. 

HARDAWAY.— Dr. and Mrs. William A. Hardaway, of St. Louis, are vis- 
iting their son. Lieutenant Francis P. Hardaway. at the Presidio. 

HELLMANN. — Mrs. George H. llelhnann has returned to her home in this 
city after a month's visit in Taconia. Wash. 

HEWITT.— Mr. and Mrs. Dlxwell Hewitt have returned from Alaska, and 
are at their home in Broadway. 

KAUFFMAN.— Mrs. James L. KaufCman lias returned from Coronado. and 
is the guest of Miss Frances Stewart. 

KOSHLAND.— Mr. and Mrs. Marcus Koshland have returned to town af- 
ter a visit in the southern part of the State. 

MacDONALD. — Mr. and Mrs. William MacDonald have returned from the 
East, and are at the Palace. 

McBEAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Athole McBean have returned from Lake Tahoe 
and are at their home in Burlingame. 

MCDONALD. — Mr. and Mrs. Jasper McDonald have returned from Pleas- 
anton, where they were the guests of Mrs. Phoebe Hearst for several 
days. 

MURPHY. — Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Murphy have arrived from St. Louis, 
and are temporarily domiciled at the Fairmont. 

OWEN. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gilchrist Owen arrived from Portland on 
Tuesday, and are at the Palace. 



July 15, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



PARTRIDGE.— Bishop ami Mrs. Sydney i ve arrived 

Francisco, and are at the Stewart 
PETERS.— Mrs. J. rid Miss Aim 

Stockton, b le ETalrmont 

I'EYt* >x.--Mr. ami Mi-s. Berni and their son hav< returned 

from the Eaat, I the st Regis. 

P1PPY.— Miss Ethel Plppy has retu fter enjoying 

an automobile trip through Lake County with friends. 
PORTER.— Mr. and Mis. Langl 7 ■ from the Ba 

- ida, and are ■< 1 thel c to une In C lonweah h a ire 1, 

kaN'KKN- Mr. ami Mrs. A. .i. Eta'nken have ■ 1 irned ■ trip (o the 

v/oseralte. 
RICHARDS. — Dr. n. <;. Richards and Mis. Richards haw n turned to San 

Francisco, after theh trip to Y/osemite Valley, where thea have been 

spending a couple of weeks, and are again guests of the Bellevu' 

Hotel. 
SOMERS. -Mi. and Mrs. Ray Somers have returned from Bartlett S] rli 

and are again in Mill Valley. 
STEWART. — Mrs. Charles Stewart has returned to her home in Broadway 

after a month's visit in Healdsburg, 
SULLIVAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sullivan and Aliss Gladys Sullivan have 

arrived from a iong absence In Europe, and will occupy their summer 

home in Santa Cruz Tor the remainder of the season. 
TODD.— Mr. and Mrs, Clarence Edgar Todd have returned from their wed- 
ding trip, and have taken an apartment in Pacific Avenue. 

VAN BKRCrEN,- Mis, E. A. Van Bergen, Mrs. Anna L. Bauer and Nicho- 
las Van Bergen have returned from Duncan Springs, and are at their 
home in Pacific Avenue. 

INTIMATIONS. 

BALLARD. — Miss Gertrude Ballard is the guest of Miss Elizabeth Uver- 
more at "Montesol" in Sonoma County. 

BEAVER. — Mr. and Mrs. Fred Beaver and Miss Isabel Beaver are occupy- 
ing their attractive summer home at Inverness. 

BLAIR. — Mrs. Blair and Miss Jennie Blair are spending the month "i" 
July at Bartlett Springs. 

BREWER. — The Reverend and Mrs, William A. Brewer and their two 
sons have closed their Hillsboro home, and are in Santa Barbara. 

CAROLAN. — Mr. and Mrs. James Carolan were guests of Mr. and Mrs 
Harry Poett in San Mateo recently. 

CASSERLY. — Miss I >aisy Casserly will !><■ tie- tfuest: of Mr. and Airs, John 
B. Casserly the greater part of the summer, 

CHIPMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. William Chipman are Bpending their honey- 
moon in Honolulu. 

COOK. — Mrs. Peter Cook of Rio Vista has been spending the week In town, 
and is at the Palace. 

CROCKER. — Mr. and Mrs. William il. Crocker, with their son and daugh- 
ters, will sail fi England tor New STork on August 1st, and will 

come directly to Cali fori lla, 

DAVIS.— Miss Sydney Davis is in Paris for a brief visit, and will later 
spend a short time in Brussels. 

DEAN. Miss Ethel 1 lean, who arrived recently from the Orient will 
spend several weeks with her sister, Mrs. Iftora Dean Magee, at her 
ranch in Nevada. 

Hi'; CAZOTTE. — Mr. and Mrs, Charles de Cozotte, who have been 

ing the early summer at Hie Peninsula Hotel, have taken possession of 
their new home at Hillsboro. 

DE SABLA. — Mr. and Mr-, Eugene de Sahla, Jr.. Miss Vera d< 38 

Miss Leontine '"■ Snbla, .11.' in London at the Clarldg 
DBITRICK:,— Miss Albertlne Deitrick is in Portland, and ts the suesl 

the family of her Manee. John Jerome Alexander. 

DOE. — Miss Marguerite D01 Is plann trip t" New 

DONOHOE.- Mr. and Mis. Joseph Donohoe and daughters 

where i hey will remain until th« earl 3 
DOYLE. Miss Jane Doylo and Aliss Ida Ross are mi Cant rl 1 

to Edinburgh. 
! ii;is<*t >ll.- Mr and Airs. Tom Diiscoll are entertaining guests at their 

San Mat. i- home. 

DROWN, Miss Newell Drown win be the guesl - I Itzabeth Liver- 

tnore 1 trip to Modoc ( ' 1 noxl month, 

DRY 3 DALE -Mr, and Mrs, Daniel D d their son. Art; 

spend the summer at their beautiful hoi n Pugel Sound. 

i-'INdi.kv - Air and Mi- ETrank Plndles are spending Uu 

Nahant. where they have taker 
■FINNEOAN.— Miss Kathleen Pli of Id Edw an! 

Barron, al Mayfleld, ovor the week-end. 
FOLGER Mi. and Mrs. James Athearn Pblger and their chlldrei 

their borne In Woodeide, where they are Bpending 1 
PULLER Mr, and Mrs. Laur 1 ■ spending the sun, 

Napa, 
GLENN \iiss Hi i , , i ; ■■■ Is planning t" spend thi 

summer at Lake Tahoe. 
HART1QAN, .way Harttgan lias joined Em 

on the .astern side of Panama. 
iiavxk Mr. and Mrs Duncan Hayne and their daughte 

l [aym vay, Switzerland. 

HE ALE T, Mr. and Mis RYederlcfc a Healey are In Honolulu, whet 

win remain for a visit of two months, 
HOOKER miss Jennie Hooker has returned from ' : 

a ..1 Mi S. h 

KEMPFF Miss Cornells Kempfl > . isit in Yell 

with friends. 

Mr, and Mis William Kip are antlclp) t from 1 

tghter. Airs. Gus L, Bdle, cl Washington. 
KNIGHT.- Mr. and Mrs Fred S Knlg I and their daughter, I se 
tor, who ha> ■ 
tor New York Julj 

\ UgU8t 



K i;.U"i HO [a lor and Mi 

Al 1 0| Uy. 

■ I ■ I ■ 

■ vxsi iALE. Mr, bo spend 

■ 

fA 

at Cat Farm. 

! \ci:i DER. — Magruder h slon of 

their country home In Uameda, where the: will rema! 1 ason. 

CARTEL. -Mrs. Jane L. Martel and hei son L tfarl I an 

' Cruz, 

1 \ts< "X. Airs. William Mi di d M Lurllni 

been travellm abroad, an - peel ed 1 ■ oes I mon th. 

1 1 1 ,ti 'X.— Admiral and Mrs. John B. Mlltoi ■ quests ol friends 1 

porl . h here thea are being entertained bj the sei 1 U e ■■■; al the 
Station. 
n 1 ; 1 • 1 iy.- Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Lawrence Murphj are ti 

Air. and Mrs. Frank Sullivan iii Santa Cruz. 
HcALLISTEU.— Mr. and Mrs. Hall McAllister and Miss Ethel McAllister 
are in Boston, having gone Wast to attend the e< nencement exer- 
cises a t 1 larvard. 
McKITTRICK.— Captain and Mrs. William H. McKIttrick are at the 

Fairmont for an extended stay. 
MORGAN. — Rev. Edward Morgan has gone to Paris after an sxt< nded 

visit in several Italian cities. 
PILLSBTJRY. — Mrs. Horace Pillsbury and her children are visiting Gen- 
eral ;in<\ Airs. Taylor, in Boston. 
POPE. — George Pope is expected back from Seattle shortly after, a brief 

trip through the Northwest. 
PORTER.— Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Porter and Hugh Porter have been the 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. Crocker at the Crocker country home 
at Glover. dale, recently 

KAMMAGE.— Mrs. Stanley Rammage has been the guest Of Mr. and Mrs. 

Arthur St. John Whitney in San Mateo. 
REIS. — Mrs. Julian Rets and her granddaughter. Aliss [la Sonntag, are 

now in New York, and will return shortly to San Francisco. 
BtrDEOUT. — Air. and Mrs. Henry Miller Rideout are enjoying the summer 

season al Gloucester, Mass 
ROONEV. — Miss Edna Rooney is the guest of Captain and Airs. Edward 

C. Sturgis in Honolulu, at Scholleld Barracks. 
RYER.— Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher Ryer and their daughter. Aiiss Doris Ryer 

are spending- the summer at the Peninsula in Shu Mateo. 
SCHILLING. — Mr. and Mrs. August Schilling are planning to settle In 

their new home at Woodside very soon. 
SCHEELJNE. — Simon C. Scheellne nil his family are guests of Mrs. A. 

Flelshhacker ai hei summer home in Menlo Park 
SON. -The Misses Blanche and Helen Son, with their brother, Charles 

Son, are sojourning at Santa Cruz. 
SMITH, — Airs. Eleanor Hyde Smith has returned to town after a visit to 

her daughter, Mrs . Baldwin Wood, at the Peninsula Hotel In San 

Mateo, 
SPALDING.- Mr. .'lei Mrs. Alfred Baker Spalding are In Germany, and 

win establish themselves for the wintei in Berlin, 
STONEY. — Mrs. Gal Hard Stones and her sister, Miss Sarah Ala.' Donald, 

are spend nmer al Lake Tahoe. 

WELCH.— Mrs. B. 1.. Welch Is established at her handsome homi 

Mateo Cor the sunamei 
WELCH.— Mr. and Airs, Andrew Welch, Jr. are In London, bul (rill leaVe 

shortly for Paris. 
WORDEN. — Mr. and Mrs C. E Woi 1 ■ : .. , ■■ they are 

ma i-. |i :_: .1 n extended 1 I 



HIS MOTHER. 



Somewhere to-night you lie awake, 

Bearing your bitterness alone; 
I cannot shield; your heart must take 

Its turn to bleed and cower and moan. 

When straight you pressed to your desire, 
And all men spoke your praise, I smiled. 

Now, naked, smitten, in the mire, 

My arms reach out for you, my child. 

Could I but sing you now to sleep, 

How strong to-morrow from my breast 

To fight and conquer you would leap! 
Lord, I keep vigil; send him rest! 

— Amelia Josephine Burr in Century. 



Letters, in order to be instructive, need not be long- 
winded. The less thought a man has given to a subject the 
more words he will use in attempting to explain. 



Pat — Sure, man, you'll never be able to work in Hono- 
lulu. The temperature is 100 in the shade. Mike — Well, Oi'll 
not be worrukin' in th' shade all th' time. 



Some people are like turtles; a hard shell surrounds all 

the meat. 



Habeiet Watsok Capwell. 



In Germany, women go in swimming clothed in their right 
minds and sensible one-piece jersey suits like Annette Keller- 
man wears, but here in America, where men and women ride the 
waves together the bathing costume is not such a simple prob- 
lem. The jokesmiths of many a decade have prodded their 
pens for something new and funny to say about the darling 
daughters who wear wondrous and fetching bathing suits, but 
never go near the water. 

Now, as a matter of sheer fact, a California girl who can wear 
bathing togs successfully, but can't swim is beaten two up and 
one to play by the girl who can strike out for herself in the 
water. This is an athletic age, and the "sit on a cushion and 
sew a fine seam, and all day long eat strawberries and cream" 
type has been superseded. Of course there will always be 
women who prefer to sit on the sands and sun their good points, 
but they do not achieve the admiration that they may have 
riveted to themselves in less athletic ages. Miss Eleonora 
Sears wore the simplest of black suits when she was down at 
Santa Barbara a season or two ago, but she swam out far be- 
yond the rafts, and admiration plunged boldly after her — the 
men admired her nerve far more than they did the nerve of the 
beach poseurs. 

There has never been the beach posing here that Atlantic 
City, Narragansett Pier and other Eastern watering places ex- 
ploit. Most of the women here who have gone in for striking 
effects in bathing suits likewise go into the water. Several years 
ago Miss Ethyl Hager, now Mrs. Lansing Kellogg, delighted 
Del Monte by appearing for her morning swim clad in a pale 
blue silk bathing suit with a few polka dots here and there. 
But this costume worked in the water as well as on the beach, 
for the wearer was an enthusiastic mermaid. Miss Newhall 
wore a bathing suit last season at Santa Barbara which was 
considered chic and ultra modish by those who had a glimpse 
of it before she dived into the water. Miss Newhall is an ex- 
pert and strong swimmer, but she likewise has a genius for 
dress, and of course her bathing suits are cut after an exclusive 
pattern. 

There has been a remarkable improvement in bathing cos- 
tumes in recent years, and there is really no reason nowadays 
why any woman should present an appearance absolutely ugly 
on the beach unless that is her invariable role. Broadly speak- 
ing, both blue and black are the most modish colors for the 
bathing costume, and the most satisfactory in every way. 
Clinging sogginess is less objectionable in these plain, dark 
colors than in any brighter coloring, and wetting does not 
change the tone of blue or black as it does other colors. I 
chanced to see Mrs. Walter Martin in quest of a new bathing 
suit, and the model that she chose was one of many fetching 
ones offered by this shop. It was a black satin model, Dutch 
neck, of course, and trimmed with bright blue King's satin. The 
skirt was crossed over a sort of underskirt of the blue, and 
likewise the waist disclosed a bit of the blue where it crossed 
in front. 

This year one finds among the smart bathing costumes a good 
many black and white mixtures, stripes, checks or plaids, with 
the stripes preferred, as they are throughout all fashion's prov- 
ince; and some of these models are extremely pretty without 
being startling or conspicuous. They are usually trimmed in 
plain black, and are desirable only in a good quality of silk. 
When I say they are extremely pretty, I mean viewed in the 
shop. A friend who is summering at Santa Cruz writes that 
when wet and clinging, the white stripe takes on distorted, awk- 
ward lines unbecoming to the figure. In this last respect, the 
black and white checks and plaids are better than the stripes, 
but they have not so smart an air on the whole. 

The black and white stripe note is sounded more satisfac- 
torily in trimming than in the whole suit, and here it is ex- 
tremely pretty, making becoming and effective collars, bias 
bands and pipings. 

Ocacsionally a brown bathing suit is very successful, but it is 
only for the woman who makes a religion of brown by virtue of 
her coloring. Brown looks rather dingy when wet, but nut- 
brown and white bathing costumes are worn by girls with 
creamy complexions, brown eyes and golden brown hair, with 
notably good effect. 



Reds have never been given the cachet of fastidious tastes. 
Children may wear them without criticism, but they look ugly 
when wet, and very few red ones are sold now even for children. 

Satin is perhaps the smartest of bathing suit materials, al- 
ways provided it is of an admirable quality. It sheds water 
readily, keeps its shape well, and the right quality does not 
cling too closely when wet. Satin and silks suitable for bathing 
costumes are expensive, and they are utterly undesirable in 
cheap quality, so unless one can afford the real thing, it is far 
better to purchase a good durable mohair bathing suit than 
a flimsy pretext at silk or satin. Mohair is a good old stand-by, 
sheds the water, and is wiry enough even at its softest to keep 
its shapeliness when wet. And it wears — nothing stands the 
hard knocks better than a good piece of mohair. It will some- 
times work several seasons without uttering a complaint loud 
enough for the by-standers to hear and realize that it is over- 
seasoned. 

There is a decided liking among the designers for models of 
the one-piece kind, with panel fronts, the belt or waistband be- 
ing in evidence only on the sides and in the back, while the line 
of the front is uninterrupted. In place of the flapping sailor 
collars, the designers are buttoning down the collars at the 
points, so that they will stay in place. A simple trick this, and 
the wonder is that it has not been turned before! But the ob- 
vious is often the last experiment. 

A great many women do not care for collars or revers on 
bathing suits. They prefer square-cut, Dutch or V-necks, with 
contrasting or self bands, counting any collar as excess bag- 
gage in the water. To meet this demand, the designers have 
turned out some very good-looking models. For example, a 
blue satin one-piece panel front has the panel outlined with a 
two-inch wide band of blue, polka-dotted with green. A band 
crossing between the panels in front gives a square, low-neck 
effect, and the same band finishes the sleeves and outlines the 
waist between the panels. This suit is priced $25, but the 
material is so admirable that it would be a good investment for 
the bather who is not confined to a mohair purse. 

Women who are really keen about the sport of bathing detest 
fussy and elaborate models, and indeed these are never so good- 
looking as the smart, simple affairs. The material and color 
may be striking, but the lines must be good and elaboration es- 
chewed if the approval of the fastidious critics is desired. This 
does not imply that all collars are taboo. Some of the best 
models have them, and they are worn by many. Big revers in 
front, with a collarless Dutch back and a front shield carrying 
out the Dutch line, arc effective, but must be well made and 
tacked in place, or chey will be limp and dejected after wetting. 
Women who will not gamble on dejected effects are the ones 
who prefer to have the neck outlined and ornamented by the 
clever use of flat-stitched bands that cannot possibly wriggle 
out of place. 

Bloomers or knickers are, of course, essential features of 
the bathing costume, and are made of the same material as the 
overdress, and attached to it. Much skill and ingenuity have 
been used to make these knickers comfortable, with absolutely 
no extra bulkiness or fullness to spoil the effect of the costume 
and to impede the action in the water. The desired result has 
been accomplished this year, and perfectly cut knickers are not 
a rarity, but the ubiquitous accompaniment of every good 
bathing suit. 




Mc^. Graham's 

HAIR RESTORER 

RESTORES 

GRAY HAIR 

to its natural color 
tJ y in a Few days 
TRIAL BOTTLE IO* 

Perfectly harmless— eaBtly ap- 
plied— will not stnio the sklo or 
ecalp. Positively sore In Its re- 
sults. Makes the hair rich and 
(flossy. Price II 64-page book 
• bout the hair FREE. 

MRS. GERVAI8E GRAHAM 
| 507 Michigan Avenue. Chicago. II). 



July 15, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



NOW SKYSCRAPERS ARE REALLY TO SHOOT UP. 

Not content with putting up forty-story steel structures in 
six months' time, a new inventor has appeared in the field, with 
a big capital behind him, who actually proposes to shoot walls 
into place with a rapid-fire gun. 

The new invention will accomplish as much in a single day 
as the united efforts of twenty-four men could create under old 
methods. The ancient cement mixer is to give place to the 
cement gun. 

No procession of men wheeling heavily-laden barrows will 
clog progress where the cement gun is utilized. Instead, liquid 
cement is actually shot into place by means of compressed air. 

Thomas A. Edison's prediction that cement was the means by 
which building construction would be revolutionized seems in a 
fair way to be realized. He planned buildings by filling giant 
moulds. The inventor of the cement gun seems to have fairly 
outdone Edison himself. 

First, there is a long tube of sufficient textile strength to 
withstand the pressure of both compressed air and water. This 
is the gun barrel. There is a valve just forward of the breech 
of the gun and another near the muzzle. Compressed air is ad- 
mitted through the first, and water through the second. 

At about the point of the vent in the ordinary breech loading 
cannon a tube-like connection is established with a hopper, a 
wide-angled V-shaped affair. 

Dry cement and sand are thrown into this hopper by two men, 
and here, aside from valve manipulation and directing the ce- 
ment stream, the human element feature of cement gun opera- 
tion ends. 

The hopper vibrates constantly, mixing its contents thor- 
oughly before it drops down through the tube connection. Once 
in the gun barrel, the mixture is shot forward by the compressed 
air fed through the valve. 

At the muzzle a stream of water is encountered that does not 
check velocity, but mixes with the sand and cement, the whole 
driving out of the gun end with sufficient force to carry it to 
the desired point. 

The incorporation of a cement appliances company was 
the first inkling the public had of such an invention. It is un- 
derstood the new company is controlled by powerful building 
interests operating in the large cities of the United States. 



NEWS FROM DEL MONTE. 

Miss A. M. Sullivan of Paris, and Miss Kate Dillon of San 
Francisco, went down to Del Monte for Independence Day. and 
its attendant festivities, as the guests of Miss Phelan. 

Mr. Ed. Tobin is at Del Monte for a two or three weeks' stay, 
putting in most of his time on the links, and getting into form 
for. the September tournament for the Del Monte championship. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Chenery, Mrs. W. H. Patton, Mrs. J. 
L. P. Berry, Miss Dorothy Berry, are at Del Monte for part of 
the summer. Mr. Chenery 's business calls him often to the city, 
but he will come down regularly for the week-end. 

One of the many auto parties of the week included Mr. and 
Mrs. W. G. Wishon, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Wishon, Miss Jeanne 
Wishon, R. W. Watson and Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Wishon, who 
motored up from Bakersfield. 

Nance O'Neil, California's favorite tragedienne, is at Del 
Monte for a short rest, registering from New York, where she 
has achieved some of her greatest triumphs. 

Mrs. Jack Spreckels, Jr., who has been at Del Monte for the 
past three months, left Monday morning for her home in San 
Rafael, but plans to return later in the season. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hlbernla Savings and Loan Society. 
For the si\ months ending June SO, 1911, a dii 

x annum on 
rday, July 1. r.'ii 
,1,-iuls no1 drawn will be added to i 

urn dividend from July 1. 1911 
HI, will draw Interest from July 1. l'Ul. 

R M T. TIN S, . •. | 
OUoe Corner Market, HcAllteti 



QPENCERIAN 

for Business, Banks and Schools 

Over 50 years the leading American Pens and the standard with expert 
writers. Sample card with 12 pens for different styles of writing and 2 
penholders with rubber and cork fingertips will be sent on receipt of 10 cts 

SPENCERIAN PEN CO. 



349 Broadway 

Spencerian pens are sold by all 



New York 

the leading stationers in California. 



For Dandruff and all Scalp Diseases 
HI A. F. COSGROVE 

SPECIALIST • 

Diseases of the Hair and Scalp, at 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

239 POWELL STREET 



THE LATEST STYLES IN 

Choice Woolens 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO., Merchant Tailors 
108-110 Sutler Street French Bank Bids. 



If the 

S T E I NWA Y 

Has a 
Reputation 
the Piano 
Merits it 

Sherman Bflay & Go. 

Sleinway and Other Pianos Player Pianos of all Grades 

Victor Talking Machines 

Sheet Music and Musical Merchandise 

Kearny and Sutter Sts„ San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Sts., Oakland 



Your stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY 
Let us guide you in your selections 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importerai of and Dealers in 
THE HIGHEST CLASS P^PER FOR OFFICE STATIONERY 
Battery and Jackson Sts. 



San Francisco, Cal 



A TREAT THAT CANT BE BEAT 

Gilt Edge Whiskeys 

RYE or BOURBON 

For sale at all first-class Groceries, Saloons and Cafes 

WICHMAN, LUTGEN & CO.. Inc. 

SOLE PROPRIETORS 
431-489 Clay and 428-414 Commercial St., San Francisco 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 15, 1911. 



Ctar n§ fc Pay Agmm 



"It's fierce!" said Miss Libbie Laff, as she breathlessly de- 
scended the stone steps of her boarding house to the young 
man who was waiting below. "That old Mrs. Thompson was 
asking impertinent questions again!" 

"Sure it's fierce," agreed young Wilkinson Witt. "It's got to 
the point where my kid brother Jimmy hangs around the front 
door when I start out to see whether I am headed this way or 
not!" 

Miss Laff shivered a bit as she tucked her hand through 
young Witt's arm. Then she giggled. "It's so ridiculous! "she 
told him. "Just as though we were criminals and the detectives 
were on our trail." 

"And all we want," said young Witt, mournfully, "is a chance 
to talk comfortably by ourselves. Why don't you find a board- 
ing house where there are two parlors ?" 

"Tnere aren't any," said Miss Laff as mournfully. "If there 
were, people would be camping 10 feet deep out in front wait- 
ing for a chance to move in. No, Billy, every boarding house 
on earth is just like this one — a girl with blondined hair like 
that Miss Schneider playing ragtime at the piano, and some 
pale-eyed chump like Sam Hastings leaning over her, singing; 
two old women like Mrs. Thompson and Mrs. White sitting on 
the sofa where they can see who goes out and who comes in, 
and criticising whoever does either; the star boarder and his 
wife occupying the two best chairs by the window and scowling 
at all the others, as though they didn't have any right_ to 
breathe, let alone to be among those present! We'd have a nice, 
cozy evening if we added ourselves to the assortment in there, 
wouldn't we?" 

Young Witt groaned. "If they'd only raise my pay at the 
office!" he said. "I saw a peach of a flat the other day!" 

"I wouldn't care so much," pursued Miss Laff, "if they'd let 
me wander on the freezing streets in peace, but they're so curi- 
ous! That Mrs. Thompson'll drive me crazy! I believe she 
lurks in the upstairs hall just to catch me when I slip out after 
dinner with my hat and coat on. 'Going out again, my dear?' 
she'll twitter. 'My, my! you do go out a lot! Aren't you afraid 
to be alone on the street after dark? How fond you must be 
of your sister's family to go to see her so often, when she lives 
so far away!' Or else it'll be: 'Girls are so restless nowadays! 
They never want to stay at home quietly. I don't see when you 
get your mending done! I should think after all day over a 
typewriter you'd be tired and want to rest!' Or else: T was 
so glad, my dear, to see a young man waiting in the parlor for 
you last night! It makes me nervous when you run out alone! 
And what theatre did he take you to? Haven't I seen him here 
before, and what did you say his name was?' O-o-o-h!" Miss 
Laff ended in a snort of wrath and disgust. 

"She'd have a fit if she knew you met me outside, the even- 
ings I didn't come in and show myself, wouldn't she?" said 
young Witt. "They al> make me tired! It ain't any of their 
business! Only I wish we could sit down comfortably for a 
peaceful evening, instead of tramping the streets like homeless 
outcasts ! Let's go over to the corner restaurant and have some 
coffee and doughnuts!" 

"No, Billy," said Miss Laff, firmly. "We did that last night, 
and you've got to quit spending money! Besides, the restau- 
rant people always act so mad if we sit and talk IS minutes 
after we get through eating. I suppose they imagine that we're 
crazy about their coffee and stuff! I can make better coffee 
myself!" 

"And you're going to get a chance to make it before long," 
asserted young Witt firmly, as they swung around a corner. "I 
have a picture of us doing the moonlight stroll in a blizzard 
along in the middle of winter, haven't you?" 

"The Prentisses," said Miss Laff, irrelevantly — "they're the 
star boarders, you know — have the big front room fixed up just 
like a sitting room, and they're away a lot in the evenings. I 
wish they weren't so frozen and stuck up, and would lend it to 
me once in a while! People just don't care!" 

"Maybe they would if they knew we were engaged," said 
young Witt. "Gee! Wouldn't that be great to be able to go in 
there and talk by ourselves?" 

Miss Laff sighed. "They'd never do anything as nice as 



that," she declared. "They don't pay attention to anybody in 
the house. And she is the owner of a sealskin coat!" 

"Is she?" asked young Witt, downheartedly. They had 
swung around the corner six times, and a fine mist had begun 
to fall as they neared the boarding house. "Well, I s'pose you 
have got to go in. There's no one in sight — quick, tell me good- 
night!" 

Just at the psychological moment when the faces of Miss Laff 
and young Witt were so close that their vision was much ob- 
scured, the boarding house door opened suddenly, and the full 
rays of the hall light shone out on them. 

It was old Mrs. Thompson who had opened the door, and she 
said "Oh, my!" in tones of highly disapproving surprise before 
she vanished. 

"She'll tell every single soul in the place!" stormed Miss Laff 
when she marched up the front steps with her head very high 
and her cheeks very red. 

"Well, if anybody objects, you just refer 'em to me!" barked 
young Witt indignantly. "I guess I've got a right to kiss the 
girl that I'm going to marry, ain't I?" 

Then he melted away as two more persons began to mount 
the steps to the boarding house. 

Young Witt was waiting for Miss Laff the next day at dusk 
when she emerged from her office building. But she was too 
full of news to be excited over his being there. 

"Billy!" she gasped, "it's all right! What do you think! 
Those were the Prentisses who came in right after me last 
night — the star boarders, you know — and she's so nice! She 
just smiled at me this morning and said, 'Oh, Miss Laff! I've 
been going to tell you that any time we're out you're perfectly 
welcome to use our sitting room for callers if you like!' Wasn't 
that sw-w-eet of her? And you know that I thought she was 
so stuck up! Now I can see that they're kind of young them- 
selves!" 

"Bully!" agreed young Witt as he drew closer to her. "But 
I've got better news. The boss has raised my pay, and this 
evening we'll go flat-hunting!" 

"Oh, Billy!" gasped Miss Laff. "Wa-wait till I find my hand- 
kerchief!" — Chicago News. 



LOVE'S FOLLIES. 



When lulled in passion's dream my senses slept. 
How did 1 act? — e'en as a wayward child; 

I smiled with pleasure when I should have wept. 
And wept with ?orrow when I should have smiled. 

When Gracia, beautiful but faithless fair, 

Who long in passion's bonds my heart had kept, 

First with false blushes pitied my despair, 

I smiled with pleasure! — should I not have wept? 

And when to gratify some wealthier wight. 
She left to grief the heart she had beguiled, 

The heart grew sick, and saddening at the sight, 
I wept with sorrow! — should I not have smiled? 

— W. T. Moncrief. 



"I understand you are a graduate of Vassar, Miss Lucy. 

Did you ever study English literature to any extent?" "Oh, 
mercy, yes! We had Hogg for breakfast, Bacon for dinner, 
Lamb for tea, and Lover in the evening." — Elgin Every Satur- 
day. 



Dr. Lyon's 

PERFECT 

Tooth Powder 



Used by people of refinement in every part 
of the world where the use of the tooth- 
brush is known, for Almost Half a Century. 



July 15, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



f 



y&K"X""''S'**~*i*^ 



i 



I 



1 



I 






I 



§ 






i 



INSIDE A PIANO 



"""X 




CHAPTER I, 

THE MUSIC comes from the inside, not the outside! It matters not how beautiful and artistic the outside of a 
piano may be, if the inside is not constructed of the • ;:st materials by the most experienced workmen, even a 
Paderewski cannot produce good music! Yet, how many piano-buyers know anything whatever about the 
inside of a piano, and the difference between inferior materials and workmanship, and really dependable and expert 
construction? 

In this and subsequent "piano talks" we shall endeavor to 
show plainly how a piano is built and describe the difference 
between a good instrument and a faulty one, between good 
workmanship and poor workmanship. It will cost us a large 
sum of money to do so — but we have all to gain and nothing to 
lose by educating the piano-buying public. 

Look at Fig. 1. It illustrates the frame of a piano with 
wrest-plank back (at top), sound-board (A), ribs (B) and the 
skeleton (C.) 

The frame is the very foundation of a piano- — a foundation 
which has to resist a pulling force of over twenty tons, for the 
smallest treble wire on an upright piano exerts a pulling force 
of over two hundred and seventy pounds, and the total pull of 
all the wires combined is over twenty tons; moreover, this re- 
sistance must be kept up night and day without impairing the 
vibrating qualities of the frame. In a poor piano, cheap, un- 
seasoned woods are used — in a good piano only carefully 
selected, we//-seasoned woods; and these are fastened together 
so solidly that the frame is stronger than if hewn out of one 
piece. 

We pass on at once to the sound- 
board (A), which may truly be 
termed the very soul-tone of a 
piano. The quality, endurance and 
dependability of a sound-board rest upon the selection and seasoning of the woods used — 
a faulty grain in a single piece will mar the entire tone of an instrument- — the slightest 
shrinkage from lack of seasoning will cause loss of tone which no amount of tuning can 
recover. 

Fig. 2 is drawn from and illustrates a small section of a "KOHLER & CHASE" Piano 
sound-board, built of the most carefully selected and properly seasoned spruce in pieces 
not exceeding two and a half inches in width, yet the woods are so exquisitely selected 
that the grain in each runs in exactly the same direction. You can imagine how many 
pieces of wood had to be rejected before this perfect harmony in the grain was achieved — 
perfect harmony in the grain insured perfect tone in the piano. 

Now look at Fig. 3, which is drawn from a small section of a rib on the sound-board of a 
Kohler & Chase Piano. Every rib on a "KOHLER & CHASE" PIANO is scientifi- 
cally graded, glued and doweled on the back of the sound-board while the latter still re- 
tains the heat of the dry kiln, so that during the cooling it takes a slightly convex form. 
This process is similar to that employed in the making of famous violins, and is so ex- 
pensive that it is only used by a few of the best piano makers. The large number of 
"KOHLER & CHASE" PIANOS sold enable us to use this expensive process without 
material addition to the price of the piano. 

If you are interested in knowing all 
about a piano and the difference be- 
tween a good and a poor instrument, it 
will well repay you to read our future 
publicity, wherein we shall describe 
every part of a piano in detail; more- 
over, we shall be delighted to take you 
through our workshops and show you 
the materials and details in order that you may thoroughly understand the subject. 

SOLE 
AGENTS 

" WEBER" 
"KNABE" 
" FISCHER" 

PIANOS 

GENUINE 

" PIANOLA 

PIANOS" 

"WURLITZER" 





and 



ORCHESTRIONS 





SOLE 
AGENTS 
•LYON & 
HEALY" 
HARPS 
"MARTIN- 
GUITARS 
MANDOLINS 
" BOOSEYS" 
" YORK- 
BAND 
INSTRUMENTS 



\ 



i 



I 

! 






g 



§ 



\ 



\ 



PIANOS 
AND PLAYER -PIANOS 

26 OTARRELL STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

And at 412 TWELFTH ST.. OAKLAND Also at PORTLAND. SEATTLE and SPOKANE 5 

'^Av=>y//###»#A\mu%\vom\\\\\v//////A«=KM\ur/^^^ 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 15, 1911. 




New York 
Financial Outlook 



Better trade conditions were evi- 
denced in the report of the United 
States Steel Corporation on unfilled 
tonnage, and the monthly figures of 
the Copper Producers' Association issued on Monday. The 
amount of unfilled orders on the books of the Steel Corporation 
show an increase of 247,871 tons, and the orders are now larger 
than they have been at any time since March 31st. Stocks of 
copper on July 1st show a decrease of 8,561,768 pounds. The 
figures of the Government crop report of last Monday have 
probably been bettered by weather conditions since the date 
of their tabulation, Ju'y 1st, and we believe this will greatly be 
appreciated and reflected in stock market quotations, the steel 
and copper reports also having been favorable. Stocks directly 
affected should show improvement, and might be preferred as 
less susceptible to varying weather conditions and reports. In- 
dications have been in evidence of quiet support during the past 
week. There seems tc be no further pressure to sell resulting 
from reports of crop damage thus far received. We look for 
further improvement in the stock market, although we do not 
look for a considerable advance at the present time. The cut- 
ting of Virginia Chem. dividend to 3 per cent appears to have 
been fairly well discounted, as the stock has held firm since 
this news came out. As stated last week, we would be ex- 
tremely careful in making any new purchases pending more 
definite indications unless on recessions. 

F. Thieriot, Resident Partner, Ehrich & Co.. 409 Pine St., San 
Francisco, California. 



Mineral Products, 
in California. 



Mineral products of ten years in 
California amounting to $478,464,- 
087 are accounted for by counties 
and by substances, in Bulletin 60 of 
the California State Mining Bureau, which has just been issued 
by State Mineralogist Aubury. The period of ten years includes 
the period 1900-1909, inclusive of both the years mentioned. 
In addition to this great showing of mineral values that the 
State has produced in the decade, Bulletin 60 shows a value 
of $309,000,000 in petroleum that has been produced from the 
first discovery of petroleum down to the end of 1909, and 
$1,508,513,000 in gold from the date of the original discovery 
of that precious metal down to the end of the calendar year 
1909. 

How rich scores of counties in California are in minerals of 
various sorts is indicated by a tabulation which gives a sum- 
mary of production for each county for ten years covered in the 
period that is credited with an aggregate output of $478,464,087. 

Bulletin 60 of the Mining Bureau has two important sections 
in addition to the statistical portion, which includes a great 
number of tabulations, each having advertising value for Cali- 
fornia. The two added sections are devoted to the text of laws 
and to maps of California counties. 

On the maps are depicted steam and electric railways, high- 
ways, etc., which supply a pocket directory for tourists. The 
laws printed in full relate to many important topics. Acts of 
the last Legislature are included and given conspicuous place, 
notably those pertaining to the Conservation Commission of 
California, the prevention of waste of natural gas; protection of 
oil and gas strata; the extraction of minerals from water; lands 
uncovered by the recession of water; withdrawing lands within 
the meander lines of streams; regulating the appropriation of 
water; the construction of works to divert water, and the man- 
agement of forest lands. There are also included laws for the 
protection of stockholders; relating to foreign and domestic 
corporations; the classification of estates; the location and sale 
of mining claims; regulating the handling of explosives; and 
various laws concerning corporations, etc. Taken as a whole, 
the Bulletin will serve as a handbook relating to mining in Cali- 
fornia, together with legal provisions related to mining and re- 
lated industries. 



Still another delay has been ar- 
California Safe Deposit ranged in behalf of the Eastern in- 
and Trust Company. terests that are endeavoring to re- 
organize the California Safe De- 
posit and Trust Company. They have been given 60 days addi- 
tional in which to demonstrate their good faith with a monetary 
deposit. In the meanwhile, however, the committee of local 
depositors proposes to make a survey on its own account. A 
committee of thirty-five has been named to frame a plan by 
which the Carnegie Brick and Pottery Company and El Dorado 
Lumber Company may be financed as purely industrial corpor- 
ations, and the Western Pacific stock sale set aside and held 
for the benefit of the depositors. Many of the local depositors 
have urged that such substantial revenue as will accrue must 
come from the Western Pacific stock. The bank holds 41,500 
shares. H. P. Wilson and his associates, representing the New 
York interests, have suggested a tentative plan for taking over 
this stock. The suggestion was that a company be formed to 
underwrite the stock at $25 a share. This was conditioned up- 
on the earnings of the company, which he stipulated must be 
shown to be between $6,000 and $7,000 a mile. It is under- 
stood that the earnings have not yet attained this sum. In this 
week's market Western Pacific was 17 bid and 17 7 g asked. 
There has been little trading in the stock, and no publication of 
the earnings on which to fasten valuations. Many of the con- 
servative members of the depositors' committee are inclined to 
regard the stock as a greater asset than Wilson's offer would 
indicate. 



It is reported in Bakersfield that the 
California Oil Fields. Mays Company will make a gas 
well of its No. 1, on section 28-31- 
23, entering the big gas zone with four-inch casing. This well 
was the scene a month ago of a spectacular blow-out, in which 
the hose attached to the rotary drill was torn loose from its fast- 
enings, and whipped through the derrick, severely injuring 
William Ross, one of '■he drillers, and driving the entire force 
out of the derrick. La+er an attempt was made to put in a six- 
inch string of casing down to the oil sand, but it froze before 
that point was reached. 

The Associated Oil Company, on the southeast quarter of 
section 13, 26-21, Lost Hills, has well No. 1, 980 feet deep, and 
will finish up at about 1,000 feet. No water was encountered in 
the formation above the oil sand. The well is reported to be 
showing up finely, and interested persons claim a 400-barrel 
well. On the southwest quarter, well No. 2 is 300 feet deep, 
with an open hole. 

The Midway Northern Oil Company's well No. 2 has come in 



EHRICH & COMPANY 

409 PINE STREET 

Members New York Stock Exchange 

Foreign Correspondents 

Securities Bought and Sold on Commission 

STOCKS, BONDS, COTTON AND GRAIN 

FERDINAND THIERIOT, Resident Partner 
Telephones: Sutler 2170 Home C 6630 San Francisco 



BONDS 

Established 1858 

SUTRO & CO. investment Brokers 

412 Montgomery Street San Francisco 

Members Stock and Bond Exchange Circular on request 



BISHOP & ELY 

630 Security Building Los Angeles, Cal. 



SCIENTIFIC TREE 
SURGERY 



Expert Tree Work by Trained Men 
CALIFORNIA OAKS A SPECIALTY 



Branch Office 



San Mateo, Cal 






July 15, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



with a rush and a roar, throwing^ oil above the derrick at the 
rate of 20,000 barrels a day. It is now under control. This 
is the second big well the company has brought in, and it is 
believed that it has even more gas pressure and oil sand than 
No. 1. 



The Board of Directors of the Anglo 
Fleish hacker Elected and London-Paris National Bank 
Bank President. this week elected Herbert Fleish- 

hacker as president of the bank, 
vice Sigmund Greenebaum, who has relinquished the presi- 
dency to accept the chairmanship of the Board of Directors. 
Fleishhacker was formerly vice-president and manager of the 
bank. The recent merging of the London, Paris and American 
Bank with the Anglo-California Bank, into the present Anglo 
and London-Paris National Bank is attributed largely to the 
efforts of Fleishhacker, who was a successful business man 
and electric light and power magnate before becoming a 
banker, and is the youngest president of a big banking cor- 
poration in the United States, being only 38 years old. He is 
a native son. The Anglo and London-Paris Bank has $25,131- 
246 of deposits. From that point of view he is the head of the 
largest commercial bank west of Chicago. A report to the 
board showed that at the close of business on June 1, 1911, the 
institution had resources and liabilities aggregating $34,560,- 
916. 



Prosperity of 
California Banks 



The compilations from the State 
banks, completed by Superintend- 
ent W. R. Williams, disclose a strik- 
ing growth in the financial strength 
of the State. The figures reveal a total expansion of assets 
during the fiscal year of more than $34,000,000 and approxi- 
mately $23,000,000 for the half year. Individual deposits for 
the twelve months have advanced $41,000,000, and for the last 
six months $13,000,000. The assets of the San Francisco banks 
have increased from $237,382,365.90 a year ago to the present 
figure of $248,092,557.62. The individual deposits in the same 
period have climbed from $196,475,366.25 to $201,832,931.85. 
The State banks of San Francisco and Oakland together com- 
prise approximately half the total of the State in both assets 
and deposits. Los Angeles has registered a marked gain, and 
its State banks now show totals of about 40 per cent of the 
strength of those of San Francisco. 



California Crops. 



The California Development Board 
reports that the field and fruit crops 
are so far advanced as to give as- 
surance of a prosperous year, and farmers and fruit growers in 
every section are reported as being well pleased with the out- 
look. The grain harvest has already begun in the early sections 
■ — the yield and quality is reported to equal the crop of 1910. 
South of Tehachapi they are said to be 25 to 30 per cent better. 
It is headed well and the grain is said to be plumper and 
heavier. Alfalfa and hay generally are turning out better than 
expected; reported at 100 per cent in many places. The acre- 
age and stand of sugar beets promise heavy yield that will 
confirm California's primacy as a beet sugar producer for 1911 
in the United States. Seventeen thousand acres in Imperial 
Valley will grow cotton this season. 



The opening of the Government project at Orland has 

given a fresh impetus to thar section. Land sales and sub- 
divisions continue all over the State. Lutheran colonists from 
Nebraska are arriving in Tehama County to settle on their 
3,500 acre tract, which is to be irrigated. A deal has been 
closed for 15,000 acres near Sacramento for colonization pur- 
poses. Two other tracts of 2,200 and 4,800 acres of the Bidwell 
Ranch have been sold for like purposes. Colonization projects 
are active in the South and in the San Joaquin Valley. 



Dairying and poultry industries are thriving and beiiu 

extended in California. Fitty-fwo thousand seven hundred an 
fifty dollars worth of mules. 290 head, have been sold by Glen: 
County breeders to a purchaser from Honolulu. 



Twenty-two hundred (2,200) cars of cantaloupes are 

timated for the Imperial Valley crop this year, and they . 
now going forward at the rate of 140 cars per day. 



Bank clearings in the cities of this State for June were 

i follows: San Francisco. $186,901,657.57; Los Angeles, $80,- 
i ^5.796.00; Oakland, $14,241,523.48; Sacramento, $5,716,- 
^l-'.85; San Diego, $7,637,498.13; Fresno, $2,845,252.93; Stock- 
on, $3,122,083.83; San Jose, $1,983,616.00; Pasadena, $3,453,- 
106.47. 



I'rivjte Wire-New York, Chicago 



Western Union Code 



J. C. WILSON 



New York Stock Exchange 

Chicago Board of Trade 

The Stock and Bond Exchange. S. F. 



Main Office 

MILLS BUILDING 

Sun Francisco 

Correspondents 

HARRIS, WINTHROP & CO. 

New York, Chicago, London and Paris 



Branch Offices 

PALACE HOTEL 

(Main Corridor) San Francisco 

HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



STATEMENT 

Of the Conditions and Affairs of the PENNSYLVANIA CASUALTY COM- 
PANY, of Scranton, in the State of Pennsylvania, on the 31st day of 
December, A. D. 1910. and for the year ending on that day. 
Published pursuant to the Provisions of Section 611 of the Political Code, 
and compiled from the annual statement filed with the Insurance 
Commissioner of the State of California. 
CAPITAL. 

Amount of Capital Stock paid up in cash $200,000.00 

ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by company % S4.S08.45 

Loans on mortgages 5.005.00 

Cash market value of all stocks and bonds owned by company.. 349.369,20 
Amount of loans secured by pledge of bonds, storks and other 

marketable securities as collateral 15,238.20 

Cash in company's office 1.206.55 

Cash in banKs 51.930.71 

interest due and accrued 3,207.23 

agents' Balances repres' ni ing business written subsequent to 

October 1, 1910 140,391.43 

Total assets $651,156.77 

LIABILITIES. 

Losses in process of adjustment or in suspense $ l6.799.oo 

Expenses of adjustment <»f losses 1,000.00 

Gross premiums on risks running one year or less, $488,893.29; 

re-insurance 50 per cent 219,196.65 

Gross premiums on risks running more than one year, ?38,404.00; 

re-insurance pro rata 14.S53.92 

Special reserve for unpaid liability losses 122.736.66 

["axes due or accrued 7,000.00 

Commissions and brokerage due oi to become due 40.636.56 

All other liabilities 3.161.06 

Total liabilities $425.3S3.85 

INCOME. 

Net cash actually received for premiums $676,430.65 

Received for Interest on bond iges 183.47 

:ceived from interest and dividends on bonds, stocks, loans and 
from all other sources 16.510.63 

a Cor rente 2,893.42 

Gross profit on same or maturil ts 1,053.25 

Policy fees .equlred or represented bj ippllcations 9,584.00 

income from all other sources 203.34 

Total income $706,858.76 

EXPENDITURES. 

Net amount | $260,563.36 

and settlement of claims 61,261.74 

olders 8.000.00 

1 ii*l .or allow 198,777.84 

rs, clerks, etc. 73,860.71 

PaM for State, National and local taxes 16,997.51 

Gross los or maturity Of ledger assets 607.50 

igents 9 

All other expenditures 46,784.09 

I expenditures $666,436.74 

M G. NICHOLS'. Vice-President 

GEO. F, O tary. 

E3, I RY, Treasurer. 

Subscribed and sworn tn before me this ISth day of February. 1911. 
FRANK R. STOCKER, Notary r I 



Citizens' Alliance of San Francisco 

OPEN SHOP 

"The llin: .'.put In trade com- 

mfaithfuln- 
duty in the in.liv Ive notion of 

ir El- 

CITIZENS - ALLIANCE OFFICES: 
Merchants' Exchange Building San Francisco 

F.mplo\mtnt Rumu: 700 Broadway. Oakland. ( 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 15, 1911. 




Plaintiff (in lawsuit)— So you think I will get the 

money, do you ? His Counsel — I think we will get it. — Puck. 

"When they take woman away from the co-educational 

college," said the speaker, "what will follow?" "I will," cried 
a voice from the audience. — Success. 

"How did your act take amateur night?" "Great. When 

I sang the first verse they yelled 'Fine!' and when I sang the 
next they yelled 'Imprisonment!'" — Christian Intelligencer. 

- "Are you a friend of the bridegroom's family?" asked 

the usher at tne church wedding. "I think not," replied the 
lady addressed. "I'm the mother of the bride." — Yonkers 
Statesman. 

She — Do you prefer an ugly woman with brains or a 

pretty woman without brains? He — Madam, I prefer present 
company to either. (And she is still wondering exactly what 
he meant.) — St. Louis Mirror. 

'— — "Did nt I give you a piece of pie last week?" demanded 
the cooking school graduate. "I didn't expect to see you again 
so soon." "I fooled you, ma'am," replied the tramp. "I didn't 
eat it." — Philadelphia Record. 

The Author — Would you advise me to get out a small 

edition? The Publisher — Yes; the smaller the better The 
more scarce a book is at the end of four or five centuries the 
more money you realize from it." — Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

There was a very stupid play presented early in the New 

York season, an adaptation, it was called by the author. Even 
the best-natured critics went away in disgust. One newspaper 
representative turned to another and said : "If this jumble had 
been presented on the other side of the water it would have 
been hissed. As there were a lot of foreign visitors present I 
wonder that it was not." "It really is a wonder," was the other's 
reply. "I would like to have hissed myself, but — you can't 
yawn and hiss at the same time." — Metropolitan Magazine. 

"Are you in favor of woman suffrage?" she asked. "Oh, 

yes! Enthusiastically," he replied. "Now, I wish you would 
tell me why you think women ought to forget their children and 
their household duties and get out into the world and mix up 

in political affairs. If you know of any good reason " "Good 

heavens! I beg your pardon. I merely said I was in favor of it 
to avoid arguing with you. Can't a man be safe on any side 
any more?" — Housekeeper. 

A reviewer in the New York Nation illustrates his own 

comments on a certain new volume of essays by a story that is 
worth putting into circulation. Three hearers, he says, of the 
admired Dr. X., were talking in the vestibule after the sermon. 
"We must admit," remarked the first, "that the doctor dives 
deeper into his subjea than any other preacher." "Yes," said 
the second, "and stays under longer." "And comes up drier," 
added the third. — Western Christian Advocate. 



"Have pity on a poor, lame man who is hungry and 

cold." "Stranger, think yourself lucky. You're only cold in one 
leg; I'm cold in both." — Pele Mele. 

Accompanied by an instructor, the new entry into the 

automobile field was out, bright and early, in his new touring 
car. They were circling the park in rather a wobbly fashion. 
"I suppose," he casually remarked to the chauffeur, as he took 
a fresh grasp on the speed lever, "that you have been around 
with worse than I?" The man gave no answer. "I say," he 
repeated in a louder voice, "I suppose you have been around 
this course with worse than I?" "I heard very well, sir, what 
you said in the first place," replied the man. "I'm jest a-thinkin' 
about it." — Metropolitan Magazine. 

A prominent business man in a Western State found it 

necessary on one occasion to defeat a bill pending in the Legis- 
lature. He went to a lobbyist and told him to beat the bill 
and prevent its becoming a law at any price. The lobbyist car- 
ried out the instructions, and the measure did not go on the 
statute books. "I'm sorry I had to resort to such a thing as 
bribery," said the capitalist to the lobbyist, "but if that bill had 
passed it would have ruined my entire business." "Gee whiz!" 
exclaimed the lobbyist in sorrow; "if I had known it meant that 
much to you I would have gotten more money out of you." — 
Popular Magazine. 



AT THE CELESTIAL GATE. 

The druggist approached the Celestial gate. St. Peter opened 
the portal for him and bade him enter and join the heavenly 
choir. "Not so fast," admonished the compounder of pills. "Be- 
fore I go in there I want to ask a few questions. Have you any 
city directories in Paradise?" "No." "Any remedies for grow- 
ing hair on bald heads and door knobs?" "None." "Any soda 
fountains?" "We don't know what they are." "Do you sell 
stamps?" "We don't use them here." "And last, but not least, 
have you any telephones?" "We have not." "Then I'll go in, 
for I guess this is Heaver, all right, all right." — Truth. 



A handsome publication by a commendable organiza- 
tion is "Deutschland," the organ of the German intercommuni- 
cation interests, and official journal of the union of German 
societies for the promotion of international intercourse. It is 
well printed, handsomely illustrated in half-tone, and is filled 
with interesting reading matter pertaining to Germany, the 
Germans and German subjects generally, written in the English 
language. 



rJiiBBERSTAiiU. 

Stencils.Seals.Signs & Etc. 



560 MARKET ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BusJli COLUMBIA Grafonola for $50 



fl 




JS 



w 



The Columbia Grafonola FAVORITE." Mahogany or Golden Oak 
E BELIEVE this to be the BEST hornless instrument that can ever be made and sold for Fifty Dollars, and we want to 
demonstrate this to you In your own home. Call Kearny 5454 and ask for the Talking Machine Department or drop us a postal. 



26 OTARRELL STREET 



KOHLER & CHASE 

1015 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 



SAN FRANCISCO 



July 15, 1911. 



and California . Advertiser 



23 




mowmi 



. Z3 

The following new automobile licenses were issued for San 
Francisco and vicinity for the week ending July 8th: 

PENNIMAN, <;. A. Lawrence tfollne 

SCOTT, DR. w. M.. Ill Kills St., S. P Palmer-Singer 

MONAKER, DR. A. J. 235 Revoii Ave., s. F Regal 

TILDEN & EAKT.E LUM. CO., Richmond E-M-F. 

smith, c. P.. Berkeley E-M-F. 

MEEKS, M. L„ si' i p. St, Petaluma P.-Toiedo 

PROST, E. S.. 360 3d St., S. F Overland 

BAXTER, H. M., 725 Mer, Ex., S. F Buick 

CHURCHILL, B. W„ .Napa Hup 

CARL, L. J., 125 Golden Gate Ave., S. F Cartercar 

DONALDSON, C Sun Anselmo Cartercar 

PETERSON. J. 10,. 102 Langton St., S. F Cartercar 

JAEGELING, I. P., 133 Geary St., S. F Chalmers 

RORABACK. C, ii, Warm Springs Bukk 

CONGDON, DR. M. J.. 2527 Piedmont Ave,, Berkeley Ford 

STANDARD OIL CO.. 4U1 Market St., S. F Rambler 

A. B. BREWING ASS'N., 11th and Bryant Sts„ S. F Knox 

VAN KEMP CO., J. C. 1254 Jackson St., S. F Buick 

MaeMILLAN. R. S. K,. 108 Irvington St., S. F Maxwell 

McNAB, JAS„ 38 Davis St., S. F Peerless 

DREWES. H. J.. 1124 Treat Ave,. S. F Hudson 

GLUNK, F. J., 177 Post St., S. F Winton 

GURIM, W. M., 167 22d Ave., S. F Overland 

WAGNER. F. B., 719 Hampshire St.. S. F Overland 

CLARITER. E. H.. Mt. Eden, Alameda County Maxwell 

LEINER, M., 855 Isabella St., Oakland Chalmers 

SMITH. F. A.. 4267 Gilbert St., Oakland Regal 

THOMPSON, G. E., 2056 Grove St., Oakland Hudson 

WARD, MRS. R. C, Mill Valley Thomas 

DEMPSEY, H. J„ 45 Kearny St.. S. F Palmer-Sir^, , 

S. F. GAS & ELEC. CO., 445 Sutter St., S. F Hudson 

JOSSELYN, C, Woodslde Hup 

VAN BOALE, ,1 D„ 'in O'Farrell St., S. F Chalmers 

TESIO. L. J.. 866 Broadway. Oakland r.ohlla. 

BLACKMAN. 10. I,. 1181 10 l Ith St.. Oakland E-M-F. 

JOHNSON. Miss J.. 146 Monte Vista, Oakland Hup 

MARYE, G. T„ 407 O'Farrell St., s. F Studebakei 

ATKINS, R. S., 168 Sutter St., s. F Franklin 

BOYD, RAYMOND, 246 Bacon Bldg., Oakland Maxwell 

THOMAS, II. ,\i.. 1825 Irving St., s. K 

KELLY, T, I-. Haywards Buick 

NEILSEN, O., 9311 10. 14th St., Elmhurst Brush 

STEWART. W. S„ 021 Hermann St., S. !•' Ralnlei 

WEHE, A. w.. 682 Magnolia St., Oakland Chalmei 

KLINKENBERGER, C. \ „ 1841 1st St., San Jose Mitchell 

ALEXANDER, w . n Bei Hotel \ illejo B-M-F. 

SSBERG, A. I., care M. A. Gunst & Co., 16th and .Miss , s F, i ! 

BRI i\VN A Si ins, E . 202 Sttnsome St s. F Oi 

McCAl LEY, T. N.. 12 Presl Tei S. F 

TIERNEY, J. 10.. 3352 Clay St., s. P Ramblei 

CONSUMERS' in ci in si. s F ...Mack 

SHEATH, MRS. R. G., San Bi •• County v\ 

LINDEMAN, w ,M . 30] Goldi a Gal S. F ind 

CAW] HON. I > v., 842 i i Bklg S P 

MEREDITH, w. 1004 i men St, ill ids Hudson 

DERMAN, DR. E. H., 2818 Russoll SI Berkeloj I 

* » * 

This week the San Francisco News Letter presents its readers 
with the first issue of its monthly automobile supplement. Con- 
sequently the items of motoring interest that usually appear in 
this column will be found in the supplement. On all other weeks 
save those on which the new supplement makes its appearance, 
however, automobile news will be published in the regular is- 
sue of the News Letter as heretofore. In editorial and other- 
wise, we believe that this Motoring Supplement will be self- 
explanatory. The publication of the same has been un- 
dertaken because of our realizing the demand for a thoroughly 
representative magazine dedicated to the promotion of motoring 
interests on the Pacific Coast. The precedence that the News 
Letter has already established for itself in this territory qualifies 
it in a particular way for issuing such a magazine in conjunctior. 
with itself. 

The province of a motor magazine should be one of especially 
wide scope on the Pacific Coast, because of the very large part 
that the motor-propelled vehicle is playing in the developme rf 
of the territory west ot the Rocky Mountains. In consequent 
of this, almost innumerable questions of automobile legislati 
and good roads are demanding consideration. In all of these 



various respects, our motor supplement hopes to be of 

istance in crystalizing and expressing the opinion of the 

ing public. In helping him more fully to appreciate and 

enjoy his car the magazine will find a place with the private 

■ v.ner, while by educating the public to the greater opportunities 

nd pleasures of motoring, it should be of similar value to the 

dealer. 

It is our intention to accept individual subscriptions at $1.00 
per year to the Motoring Supplement of the S. F. News Letter, 
this subscription to include the S. F. News Letter of the same 
date of issue. Owing to the fact that it was not specifically 
stated in circulars issued by the S. F. News Letter that the 
S. F. News Letter of the week of issue in which the Supple- 
ment appears would also be sent to subscribers, we wish to 
make this clear that such is the case. This Supplement will 

appear the third Saturdav of each month. 

* * * 

Have you a motor boat? If so, do you appreciate the 
fact that you are not only running the same risk of an explosion 
or fire that you would with an automobile, but you are also 
running the risk of other marine disasters, such as collision 
with another vessel or with some floating object, or stranding, 
capsizing, sinking or other marine disaster? 

The St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company is making 
a specialty of this class of business under a very favorable pol- 
icy, and their agents up and down the Coast are writing a very 
large number of risks, which is evidence that the majority of 
owners think the risk is one that should be covered by insur- 
ance. 

The policies are made to cover the vessel wherever she may 
be at any season of the year. Even though the boat may be 
put in a boathouse, it is still covered against fire. Fittings and 
equipment may be removed from the vessel and still be cov- 
ered, and in case the vessel is not in use for any thirty con- 
secutive days and is laid up in a safe place, a return of part 
of the premium is made to the assured. 

For further particulars, call on any marine agent of the St. 
Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company. 

On July 6th. 7th and 8th, a convention of all Stearns dealers 
and branch managers v/as held at the factory at Cleveland, and 
practically every city of size in the country was represented. 
The convention was attended by men from practically every 
State, and an immense amount of enthusiasm was displayed in 
connection with the announcement of the new Steams-Knight, 
embodying the Silent Knight type of motor. 

A large number of orders were brought to the meeting by 
dealers from individual motorists, who wish to be the first to 
secure this wonderful new engine in their locality. 

Addresses and talks were delivered by President F. B. 
Stearns, Vice-President Roy F. York, Secretary and Treasurer 
Edwin McEwen, Chief Engineer James G. Sterling, Production 
Manager C. E. Hadley, Sales Assistant to the President Rollin 
H. Williams, and Advertising Manager Henry H. Hower. 

That the advent of the Knight motor is most welcome in this 
country was seen from the very first. Everybody in attendance 
at the convention wa c more or less familiar with the motor, 
and after talks on design and construction by Messrs. Sterling 
and Hadley, the dealers and branch managers were called upon 
to give their opinions of the new engine. Without a single ex- 
ception they were unquestionably in favor of the new motor, 
and they are all looking forward to more business than they 
have ever done in the past. 

Aside from the banquets, luncheons, theatre parties, etc., 
there was a most startling demonstration of the Knight engine; 
the wonderful acceleration test of the Panhard-Knight in Eng- 
land being beaten by the new Stearns-Knight model. In the 
hands of Louis J. Perre, experimental chief of the Stearns Com- 
pany, the new car was started from a dead standstill on high 
speed alone, and inside of 40 seconds was going at a 49 mile an 
hour clip. This was with four people in the car, and is con- 
sidered the greatest acceleration test ever given any stock car. 



DESTlrVY. 

To-day, one fateful moment, Soul 

Made craven compromise with Sense : 

I shudder, journeying toward the goal 
Of Ciisis, days or ages hence. 

— Gottfried Hult in Century. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 15, 1911. 




BANKING 



THE CONQUEROR. 

It's easy to laugh when the skies are blue 

And the sun is shining bright; 
Yes, easy to laugh when your friends are true 

And there's happiness in sight; 
But when Hope has fled and the skies are gray, 
And the friends of the past have turned away, 
Ah, ther., indeed, it's a hero's feat 
To conjure a smile in the face of defeat. 

It's easy to iaugh when the storm is o'er 

And your ship is safe in port; 
Yes, easy to laugh when you're on the shore 

Secure from the tempest's sport ; 
But when wild waves wash o'er the storm-swept deck 
And your gallant ship is a battered wreck, 
Ah, that is the time when it's well worth while 
To look in the face of defeat with a smile. 

It's easy to laugh when the battle's fought 
And you know that the victory's won; 
Yes, easy to laugh when the prize you sought 

Is yours when the race is run; 
But here's to the man who can laugh when the blast 
Of adversity blows; he will conquer at last, 
For the hardest man in the world to beat 
Is the man who can laugh in the face of defeat. 

— Emil Carl Aurin in National Magazine. 



I MM AN U EL. 

Still art Thou with me! White clouds of the noond?y 
Reveal Thy presence moving on before ; 

The stars of night. Thy fiery pillar guiding, 
Still lead mc as Thine Israel of yore. 

I hear Thee in the wind's breath lightly moving 
The blades of grass, the leaf upon the tree; 

Behold Thee in the sunset and the dawning, 

The trembling shafts of sunrise show me Thee. 

From soaring heights I see Thy vast horizon 
Sink slowly, slowly; circling in repose 

The nearer plains, the far supernal mountains, 
And that great mystery of the sea that goes 

In slow tide waves about the world forever. 

Obedient to Thy will unresistingly! 
I hear Thee in the murmurs of the forest, 

And lie within its shadows feeling Thee! 

Lo, Thou hast guided me and strength hast given, 
And courage, yea, and faith by night and day; 

And now the long, long journey nearly ended, 
Uphold me that I faint not by the way! 

Still art Thou near ! The silver trumpets blowing 

Amid the wilderness at eventide 
Summon Thine Israel to the night's encampment ; 

Lord, in Thy tarrying presence I abide ! 

— M. E. Buhler, in New York Sun. 



"Pa, is a vessel a boat?" "Er — yes — you may call it 

that." "Weil, what kind of a boat is a blood-vessel?" "It's a 
life-boat. Now run away to bed." — Boston Transcript. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsn's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Capital. Surplus and Undivided Profits $11,060,796.92 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10.170.490.90 

Total Resources 43,774,997.72 



I. W. Hellman, Jr. 
F. L. Llpman 
James K. Wilson . 
Frank B. King ., 



Isaias W. Hellman. President. 

..Vice-President W. McGavin Assistant Cashier 

..Vice-President E. L. Jacobs Assistant Cashier 

..Vice-President V. H. Rossetti Assistant Cashier 

Cashier C. L. Davis Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 



Isaias W. Hellman 
C. de Gulgne 
Leon Sloss 
Percy T. Morgan 
F. W\ Van Sicklen 
Hartland Law 

Customers of this 
dent banking. New 



James L. Flood 
Henry Rosenfeld 
J. Henry Meyer 
Charles J. Deering 
James K. Wilson 
F. L. Lipman 
bank are offered every facility consistent with pru- 
accounts are invited. SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



I. W. Hellman, Jr. 
William Sproule 
Wm. Haas 
Wm. F. Herrln 
John C. Kirkpatrick 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO 

SIR EDMUND WALKER C. V. O.. LL. D.. D. C. L. 
President 



ALEXANDER LAIRD 



Genera! Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 

Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 8,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are is- 
sued in denominations of 

$10. $20, $50, $100, and $200 

and the exact amount payable in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated on the face of each cheque, while in other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Mmnger 

450 California Street corner Leldesdorff 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings (The German Bank) Commercial 

(Member <>i the Associated Savings Banks of Ban Francisco.) 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Guaranteed Capi Uil $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

reserve and Contingent Funds 1,605,792.68 

Employees" Pension Fund 113.473.47 

Deposits June 30, 1911 44.567,705.83 

Total Assets 47,173.498.51 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post Office, or Express Co.'s Money 
Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours — 10 o'clock a. m. to ' 0*1 lock p. m., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock n evenings from 6:30 O'clock p. in. to S o'clock p. m. 

for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS- President, X. Ohlandt; Flrsl Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; 
Second Vice-President and Manager, George Tourny; Third VI© 
iipnt, .1 \v. v.m i;> 1..11, I'usi'i.T. a. ii. u. Sehmldt, Assistant Cashier, 
William Herrmann; Secretary, A, 11 Muller; Assistant Secretaries, G. J. O. 
Folte and Wm, D, Newhouse; Goodfellow, Eells & Orrlck, General Attor- 
neys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS- \\ Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, George Tourny, J. 
W. Van Bergen, Ign. Stelnhart, I. N. Walter, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. 

"Kiiisi ;m>'l AY. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH— 2572 Mission Street, between 21st and 22d streets. 
For receipt and payment of deposits only, C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH— 432 Clement street, between 5th ami 

Bth avenues. For receipt and payment of deposits only. W. C. Heyer, 

Manager. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

N. W. COR. OF SUTTER AND SANSOME STS. 

Paid Up Capital $4,000,000.00 

Reserve and Undivided Profits 1,700,000.00 

Deposits 23,600,000.00 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10,300,000.00 

Sig. Greenebaum, President. 
H. Flelshhacker. Vlce-Pres. & Mgr. A. Hochsteln Asst Cashier 



Jos. Frledlander Vice-President 

C. F. Hunt Vice-President 

R. Altschul Cashier 

A. L. Langerman Secretary 



C. R. Parker Asst Cashier 

Wm. H. High Asst. Cashier 

H. Choynskl Asst. Cashier 

G. R. Burdlck Asst. Cashier 



Issues Travellers' Letters of Credit, available in all parts of the world: 
buys and sells Foreign Exchange, and Issues drafts and cable transfers. 
Accounts of Banks, Bankers, Corporations, Firms, and Individuals 
Invited. SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 

When nothing else will 
Start Dirt YOU KNOW 

SAPOLIO 

WILL DO IT 
Works Without Waate-CLEANS, SCOURS, POLISHES 



July 15, 1911. 



and Californi.i \dvertiser 



25 



A L@da®ir ffip®mm ftfe© Jonmigl!© 

COLLECTED AND EDITED BY LEOPOLD JORDAN. 

Jumbobezzi-on-the-Umptydumzee, Africa, April 30, 1909. 
To His Most Gracious Majesty, Evenheart VII. 

What a wonderful and desirable change is this I am enjoying 
in the natural wild beast menagerie of Africa. I am being 
treated right royally. Everywhere my tour portends to be a 
success, at least I thought so last night when seated around our 
campfire; even the untamed beasts tendered me a roaring wel- 
come. 

However, I came to find big game, and judging by the play 
they put up, I've found it. This morning we were on the track 
of a handsome specimen of lionhood, a prey-searching king of 
the forest. Though some distance away, we detected in his 
sonorous voice the beautiful ballad, "I Am Waiting for You." 
No doubt he wanted to lionize me, but my inborn diffidence 
saved me from a too-close intimacy. I was taught in my youth 
that too much familiarity breeds contempt. Bearing that in 
mind, I have avoided an over-brimming familiarity with the 
African lion. There's no telling what form his contempt takes. 
I certainly have no urgent desire that it should be my form. 
He is evidently a student of etiquette, for he has a rapacious 
appetite for form, though quite unconcerned as to what form or 
whose form. All forms look alike to him. This denotes a de- 
lightful democracy in his Royal make-up. So democratic is he, 
indeed, that shades of complexion, whether white, green, yel- 
low, buff or black, force on him no color line. One other char- 
acteristic I notice in him is his keen business instinct. Here is 
undisputed evidence of emulation of the cold-blooded methods 
of modern folk in that he is after the lion's share. But why 
should I be that share, or any part of it? He needn't take any 
stock in Terrorious. For that reason I have deemed it well to 
be a little distant. In some cases, and the lion's a case, distance 
lends enchantment to the view. I think most folk will agree 
with me when I say there's mutual enchantment where two 
keep discreetly apart — one from fear of being served up a la 
abattoir with Lionaise dressing, the other suspicious of some- 
thing he doesn't know just what. 

Proceeding further in my analysis of the lion, I find he has 
no denominational bias .whatever. A Mohammedan tastes as 
good to him as a Christian. This is strange, in view of the 
number of itinerant missionaries he has assimilated. On that 
account alone one would naturally expect to find in him a de- 
nominational disagreement. He has swallowed so much dogma 
that it's a marvel he hasn't before now shown symptoms of ec- 
clesiastical rabies. Because of this tremendous denomina- 
tional potion, zoologists are wondering whether or not his ter- 
rible roar is an indication cf internal suffering. 

Yesterday we resumed our excursions into the jungle. 

Our hunting party started out to the northwest, where, a 
native runner informed us, a lion was prowling in the thicket. 
Hurrying with discreet watchfulness, we espied the beast hard 
by. He evidently scented us and hid behind a huge sign of an 
American sewing machine company which, while familiar along 
the beautiful shores and valleys and mountains of my beloved 
land, came upon us as a surprise in that wild haunt of savage 
and beast. 

For long hours we watched the great sign above which would 
occasionally bob up the head of the lion and as quickly disap- 
pear. I took aim at the beast, but with no success. Our guide. 
Mushydingahdah. was the coolest among us, and at times I 
feared I could discern a grin of derision cross his swarthy face. 

Throughout the morning it was the same old story. The wily 
monster of the forest simply defied us, bobbing up and bobbing 
down. 

After standing at safe distance and firing with steady air.i 
for six hours, the lion again appeared as before above the 
big sign, when fortune at last favored me. I sent a shot so 
true that his head scattered into a thousand pieces and a buz- 
zing whirr rent the air. 

"He got it this time!" I cried. And with leaps and bounds 
we made our way to capture what was left — the headless be 
of the beast. With extreme caution we ventured to the big sign 



to find the lion's head was a wooden contrivance worked by a 
mechanical device to accentuate the sewing machine company's 
dvertisement. 

"Wal, I'll be switched!" I exclaimed in good Yankee dialect. 

I later discovered that Mushy, as we generally called our 
f ;tiide, had been educated in America, and desiring to return to 
Ills native heath and resume his calling of "Intrepid Guide and 
Lion Hunter," bargained with the sewing machine company 
to act as their sole advertising agent in African territory only. 

Thanking Your Majesty for the unlimited hunting privileges 
you have extended me within your jurisdiction, 

I beg to remain Your Majesty's obligated servant, 

Terrorious R. (Rex.) 



(The Coronation and Queen Mary's black stockings that so 
offended the aesthetic eye of the Duchess of Mulberry, will be 
discussed by ex-President Terrorious in his Stolen Letter thai 
will appear in next Saturday's Neivs Letter.) 



Dr. Agnew, 

Francisco. 



rectal diseases exclusively. 8S1 Market street, San 



TO PHYSICIANS 

When the Needs of Your Profession 
Require a Pure Tonical Stimulant 
Nothing can be Purer or Better Than 

HUNTER 
BALTIMORE RYE 




Sold at all first-class cafes and by jobbers. 
Wm. Lanahan & Son, Baltimore. Md. 



S c /c per month 

SAVED on the investment by 

buying the 

ALASKA REFRIGERATOR 

900,000 SOLD SINCE 1878 

We have a Test Refrigerator to prove what we 
claim for it. Please call and see it. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 



557-563 Market Street 



San Francisco 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 15, 1911. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



THE HAMLIN SCHOOL 

A HIGH CLASS BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

Comprising a French School for Little Children, Primary, Inter- 
mediate, Hiyli Sehoo] mm i i '■■'• i Graduate Departments, Household 
Economics. Drawing. Painting and Eloi ution, 

Accredited by University of California, by Letand Stanford Junior 
University and by Eastern Colleges. 

Courses in Singing, Instrumental Music (piano, violin, organ. ■;■ 
flute, etc.), Theory and Composition. Harmony. Sight Reading. Musi- 
cal Dictation, Choral and Orchestral Practice, ■ i- . 

School re-opens Monday, August 7th. 



MISS SARAH D. HAMLIN, A. M., 



2230 Pacific Avenue, San Francisco. 



Phone West 546. 



MANZANITA HALL 

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA. 
A healthful home school for boys— thorough, efficient, growing, 
progressive. Location adjacent to Stanford University makes pos- 
sible a school iife of unusual advantages and privileges. First 
Semester opens August 29, 1911. 
For catalogue and specific information, address 

W. A. SHEDD, Head Master. 



A. W. Beat Alice Berft 

BEST'S ART SCHOOL 

1628 Bush Street 



Life Classes 
Day and Nlfifht 



Illustrating 1 
Sketching 
Painting 



Miss Harker's School 



PALO ALTO 

CALIFORNIA 



Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year begins August 15th. 
Catalogue upon application. 



INSTITUT BERTHELOT 

Ideally situated at 34 Hue Ribera. Paris. Mme. Leon Berthelot, 
Principal. Exceptional advantages for American girls desiring to 
complete their education in France. Superior facilities for thorough 
instruction in 

LANGUAGES, ART AND MUSIC. 
Beautiful surroundings, perfect equipment. For catalogue and ref- 
erences, address School Department, Literary Digest, also 

MR. THOS. WHITTAKER, Bible House, New York City. 



The Von Meyerinck School of Music 

Will be open during (he Summer for Special Teachers' Courses for (he study of 
the German Lied and French Repertoire 
COMPLETE VOCAL EDUCATION. 
Sight reading, musical history, dramatic action, piano, classes in 
German, French and Italian. Specially coached accompanists. STU- 
DIO RECITALS. 818 Grove St. Phones Market 1069; S. 1069. 



BOONE'S UNIVERSITY SCHOOL 

FOR BOYS BERKELEY 

Begins its thirtieth year August 9th. Accredited 

to Universities of California and Stanford, and five 
Eastern universities. For catalogue apply 

P. R. BOONE. 2029 Durant Avenue. Berkeley. C»l. 



MISS HEAD'S SCHOOL 

2538 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal. 

Boarding and day school: college preparation; accredited to college; 

MARY E. WILSON. M. L„ Prii 



24th year, August 15, 1911. 



SNELL SEMINARY 
2721 Channing Way, Berkeley. 
Boarding and Day School for girls. Beautiful location. Outdoor 
life. Accredited to University of California, Stanford. W : 
Mills and other colleges for women. Term opens August :'th 
MRS. EDNA SNELL POULSOX Principal. 



.STAMMFR NO MORE Scientific Talking will cure you. 

" x «■•"*«••*-•■»»■ Hundreds have been cured under my 

instructions, Why Not You ? Write for particulars. 



M. L. HATFIELD 



m6j GROVE STREET. 



OAKLAND, CAL. 



W& Miwler of-Yomfa Main/ 



The trouble growing out of the oc- 
The Moroccan Trouble, cupation of the more northern and 

northwestern portions of Morocco 
by France and Spain, which Germany says fully justifies her 
in occupying the more Southern regions, including the town 
and seaport of Agadi r , form a war cloud of no small propor- 
tions. And what gives the situation a decidedly critical aspect 
is that Germany, France, Spain, Russia and England have taken 
steps for the prevention of international complications, but in 
doing so they have ignored the powers signatory to the Alge- 
ciras Convention, including the United States, and if serious 
complications grow out of the action of the five powers that 
have constituted themselves a sort of an arbitral court, it will 
be because Washington refuses to accept any compromise that 
awards Germany a permanent foothold at Agadir, and the rea- 
son is plain. In that event, Agadir, which is the largest and 
finest harbor on the northwest coast of Africa, in possession of 
Germany, the Kaiser would have a splendid naval station, with 
room enough to accommodate fully one-half of the entire Ger- 
man naval force, which the Washington Government would be 
obliged to regard as a menace to the Monroe Doctrine, for it is 
a short sail from Agadir to Brazil, more especially, where Ger- 
many already has a large and prosperous colony, but all the 
Atlantic shore of the Spanish-American nations would be as 
easy of access by German warships and transports as Brazil. At 
the Algeciras convention of five years ago, the United States 
was not at all in harmony with Germany's proposal to occupy 
a sphere of influence in any part of Morocco, and reasons have 
multiplied since the convention adjourned why this nation 
would have the right to consider the occupation of Agadir and 
Southern Morocco a positive menace to the position of the 
United States toward the South American republics. 

The plain facts of the matter are, the Sultan and tribesmen 
of Morocco have fully ripened Morocco for extinction as a 
separate nation, and division among the States of Europe, and 
no doubt when Russia. Germany, France, England and Spain 
get their heads together some such result will be agreed upon. 
In the impending diplomatic battle by the very nature of things 
Russia and France and England would certainly stand together, 
and should Austria be drawn in, she would reinforce France, 
for Vienna has already notified Berlin that Austria would not 
sanction any schemes of any nation to hinder France in her 
armed invasion of Morocco. Meanwhile the German-inspired 
press continues to insist thai the Government make the occupa- 
tion of Agadir and Southern Morocco not only permanent, but 
make the country desirable for founding a German colony. It 
does not now appear what England's purpose is in mixing up 
in the affair, unless it is to strengthen the hands of France as 
against Germany. Two weeks ago, Spain officially justified 
the invasion of Morocco by France, though at the same 
moment she was doing the same thing for herself. Germany 
implicates Spain with France in a scheme that contemplates 
a division of Morocco between France and Spain, and the tak- 
ing possession of Agadir by a German cruiser was simply to 
get Germany's name in the pot against the time of serving the 
repast. But the French press and French public are just as 
vehement in denouncing what they call "German intrusion" as 
the German press and public are insistent that Germany make 
Agadir and Southern Morocco permanent German territory. It 
certainly is a very complicated situation and state of affairs, 
but more than likely diplomacy will clear the atmosphere very 
soon, unless the United States should protest that in occupy- 
ing Agadir, Germany has ulterior motives. 



The Khedive of Egypt is visiting 
Egypt Seeking Trouble, the Sultan of Turkey, and the pre- 
mier, who is acting for him in his 
absence, is managing things in a way that may oblige Great 
Britain to reach out her strong hand. He has insulted the Cop- 
tics, descendants of ancient Egypt, by refusing to recognize 
their gathering, and showing a great liking for the Mohamme- 
dans, who also are in convention, and who have practically 



July 15, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



declared the political doctrine that Egypt is not for Egyptians, 
but for those of the Mohammedan faith. This is almost an act 
of treason, for it is a denunciation of British rule and British 
residents of Egypt. It is feared by the Coptics and Europeans 
that the mission of the Khedive to Turkey at this time is to 
consult with the Sultan about the things his premier is doing, 
which looks like a scheme to repudiate British authority in 
Egypt, and make it a solid Mohammedan nation for the ulti- 
mate purpose of restoring Turkish political and religious juris- 
diction over the land of the Pharaohs. It will be remembered 
that it was this group of Egyptians that Colonel Roosevelt took 
to task during his visit to the University at Cairo on his way 
from the jungles of Africa. 



Refugee and former President Cas- 
Castro Back Again. tro has again fooled the police of 

England, France and Germany, and 
is now on the soil of Venezuela, where it is said fully one thou- 
sand of his old soldiers have already flocked to his standard, 
and more than willing to help their old leader to inaugurate a 
state of civil war to reinstate the agitator in the presidential 
chair, and as all the world knows, his return is for no other 
purpose, fierce fighting may be expected almost immediately, 
unless the program of the Government to arrest and imprison 
every prominent Castro sympathizer in Venezuela fails, and 
that work is now going on with remarkable swiftness. But even 
so, Castro is not only an able soldier as well as statesman, but 
resourceful. A fortnight ago the News Letter announced that 
Cipriano Castro had arrived in disguise at the West Indies on 
a tramp ship, and was headed for his fatherland. Should he 
succeed in organizing an army and inaugurate a reign of terror 
in Venezuela, England, France, Germany and the United States 
will be pretty sure to have something to say, for these four 
nations have several million dollars invested in various enter- 
prises in the republic, every one of which Castro denies having 
any legal validity, especially the claims of the French cable 
and telegraph company and of the American Asphalt Company, 
— the latter, Castro claims, owes Venezuela $5,000,000, for 
which sum the Venezuelan Supreme Court gave judgment be- 
fore Castro ran away. Castro's hostility to this country is al- 
most certain to lead him into a serious clash with the Washing- 
ton Government. The presence of Castro in Venezuela is a 
calamity to every business and political interest in the republic, 
for the nation was getting on its feet and prosperity was to be 
observed throughout the country, but it is not strong enough 
to weather such a storm as Castro is likely to sweep all over 
the republic with. 



Ireland has adopted a new system 
Of General Interest. for the improvement of the agri- 
cultural regions which will, within 
the next two or three years, increase the potato yield by $10,- 
000,000 in value, and other ground crops in nearly the same 
proportion. 

Russia and Italy have signified their purpose to put a stop 
to Turkey's policy of extermination in Albania. 

Montenegro has mobilized 7,000 troops, ostensibly to guard 
the Albanian frontier against invasion from that quarter, but 
as the Montenegrans are in perfect accord with the purpose of 
the Albanians to establish their independence, there is a sus- 
picion that the mobilization of a Montenegran army corps is for 
quite another object than aiding the Turks, even in so indirect a 
way. 

Events seem to be shaping themselves for the employment of 
the armies and navies of Europe and America. There is the 
Albanian trouble, which is likely to involve all the Balkan 
States; there is the decree of the Sultan of Turkey, obliging the 
Christian men of his empire to join the army — hitherto they 
have been exempt — there is Germany and France biting thumb. 
over possession of Morocco; there is a new conspiracy in Por- 
tugal to restore the monarchy, and there is Germany's close 
proximity, with a war base, to the Latin-American republics. 
not to mention Castro on his native soil raising an army 
prosecute a civil war, and defying the powers, includi:; 
United States. There are plenty of war clouds, and some oi 
them portend stormy weather. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Pov ell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



TFrHATT TAVERN 

J- «B-J ^«» A II M, V^ COR. EDDY and. POWELL STS.. S. F. 

Phones: Douglas 4700: C 34 17 

A New Departure 

The management is pleased to announce to the patrons 
ofTechau Tavern, that hereafter, in addition to our vocal 
and instrumental concerts during luncheon, shopping 
hours, and dinner, there will be a continuous vocal 
entertainment between the hours of 8:30 p. m. and 12:30 



The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 Home C 6705 



BLANCO'S 0^renandL arkin 



Phone Franklin 9 



No visitor should leave the city without seeing the finest cafe 
in America. ViBit our new annex 



TREAT YOUR FAMILY TO A SUNDAY 
DINNER AT 

JULES Under MONADNOCK BUILDING 
SPECIAL MUSIC GRILL FOR LADIES 



St. Germain Restaurant 

60-64 Ellis St., San Francisco 

Capacity 600 Seats 
OUR SERVICE AND PRICES WILL PLEASE YOU 



GRAND RESIDENCE SITE 

Unobstructed 
Marine View- 
Lot 45x120 to Rear Street on Sunny Side of 
Russian Hill's Finest Block 

FOR SALE — Account of Non-resident Owner, by 
John McGaw & Co., 

REAL ESTATE AOENTS 

232 Montgomery Street Mills Building 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 15, 1911. 



SAN FRANCISCO LIFE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

HOME OFFICE: 57 POST STREET, 7th Floor 
San Francisco 

JOHN A. KOSTER, President 

THE BEST POLICIES ON EARTH TO SELL 

THE BEST MEN WANTED TO SELL THEM 

THE BEST CONTRACTS TO THE BEST MEN 

SEE OUR LIST OF STOCKHOLDERS 

Address the Company 
CATHCART MACGURN, Assl. General Managei and Director of Aeencies 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $1,500,000 



Assets, $8,150,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 
San Francisco, California. 



Cash Capital, $400,000 



Cash Assets, $1,117,480.03 



Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Employers' Liability. General Liability. Teams, Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective. Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass, Personal Accident 
insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurer; F. P. Deering, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man, W. E. Dean, F. P. Deering, E. F. Green, James K. Moffltt, J. W. 
Phillips, Henry Rosenfeld. Adolph A. Son. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 416 Montgomery St, 
San Francisco. 



The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000 

Surplus to Policyholders 3,050,068 

Total Assets 7.478.441 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING, 
Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 
350 California Street. San Franclaco 

The Weft Coaft Life Insurance Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Geo. E. Billings Roy C. Ward James K. Polk 



J. C. Meussdorffer James W. Dean 



Geo. E. Billings Co. 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED 
312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 2283 

Home Phone C 289? 





INHVKANCB »■ 



Taxation of insurance companies in California has been con- 
siderably complicated by recent enactments. The new laws 
affecting the situation are an amendment to Article 13 of the 
Constitution, being new section 14 thereof; a chapter 335 of the 
laws of 1891, making the above amendment effective; and 
amendment to section 22 of article 4 of the Constitution, and an 
amendment to article 11 of the Constitution being 8 a. The 
first amendment referred to, and the enacting statute provides, 
that for raising five million dollars for the Panama-Pacific Ex- 
position the State Board of Equalization shall fix a tax of 
$1,250,000 in each year up to and including 1914; this to be on 
all property subject to taxation in July, 1910. In the amendment 
8 a, San Francisco was given the right to amend its charter so 
as to authorize the raising of five million dollars more for the 

Exposition. 

* * * 

Superintendent of Insurance Hotchkiss has presented his 
final reports in the liquidation of two co-operative fire insurance 
corporations, the Empire State Fire Insurance Association and 
the Citizens' Fire Insurance Association, formerly transacting 
business at Utica, and has obtained orders from Justice De An- 
gelis of the Supreme Court directing the dissolution of the cor- 
porations and the distribution of their assets in the form of divi- 
dends to creditors. In each of these cases, through assessments 
upon the members of the corporations, it has been possible to 
secure sufficient funds to declare dividends of, respectively, 
98 1 /2 to 96 per cent — this, at a total expenditure in the two 
cases of 5^ and 6 2-3 per cent of the amount involved. The 
liquidation of the two companies has covered a period of less 
than a year. These results have been accomplished without 

the services of counsel. 

* * * 

The work of the Life Underwriters' Association, as reviewed 
by Mr. Powell, was a revelation to many of the local under- 
writers, who have not paid much attention to the general growth 
of the business, but kept closely to their own company. The 
life underwriting business of the entire country, it was ex- 
plained, has been undergoing a change in recent years, and is 
establishing an esprit de corps that would not have been possi- 
ble a few years ago. Mr. Powell told of the work in other cities 
and outlined the great possibilities for an association in the In- 
land Empire that would be of inestimable service to the public. 

* * * 

The new insurance code ot the State of Washington not only 
actually provides for a compact, but offers a premium to the 
companies that join therein. When the bill was pending in the 
Legislature (1911) earnest efforts were made to convince those 
who were trying to prevent a compact that the law as they had 
drawn it did not accomplish what they desired. They refused 
to listen, and insisted that they knew their business. Now 
some of the men who were so sure the law would prevent com- 
pacts realize their mistake, and are putting up a great howl. 

* * * 

We Americans are ready to admit that we lead the world in 
just about everything that is worth while. It should, therefore, 
be a shock to our pride, and make us talk a little smaller, when 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 



Organized 1863. 



Cash Capital, $3,000,000 



Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere in United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss 
by fire. Automobile Insurance. Indemnity for loss of rental Income by 
fife. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent. J. J. SHBAHAN, Ass't General Agent. 

324 Sansome Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company of California 

Insure Against LOSS OF INCOME, EARNING POWER, OR SALARY 

F. A. STEARNS, Manager Accident Department 
SHREVE BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 



July IS, 1911. 



and California \dvertiser 



29 



we learn that most European countries have an annual per cap- 
ita fire loss of only a few cents, whereas the American tribute 
runs into dollars. Many, if not most, of our fires are due to the 
absurd way in wiiicn rubbish is handled. 

* * * 

Once it be licensed in Nevada and Arizona, to which States 
it is now seeking entrance, the Massachusetts Bonding and In- 
surance Company of Boston, will be operating in every common- 
wealth on the Pacific Coast. Under the management of F. B. 
Squires the company has recently opened a branch office at San 
Francisco. 

* * * 

This year's recipients of the Geo. E. McNeill medal, pre- 
sented annually by the International Association of Accident 
Underwriters, include Nellie Caskey, a sixteen-year-old girl of 
Fairmont, Ind.; Thomas Barrington, Russell, Can.; and Walter 
J. Seaborn, of Berkeley, Cal. 

* * # 

The National Surety Company last Thursday sent to the city 
of Reno a check for ten thousand dollars to pay the bond of E. 
H. Christie, Reno's former city clerk, now serving a term for 
embezzlement of city money. Only a few days ago the surety 
company refused to pay, and invited the city to sue for the 
money, which it did. 

* * * 

The Sovereign Fire, of Canada, after delays extending over 
nearly two years, was awarded a California license on July 2d. 
C. J. Stovel will be general agent. 

Secretary Betts, of the Continental Casualty, will visit San 
Francisco some time during the present month. 

Special Agent Philip Weinmann, of the California Fire, a 
nephew of Secretary Weinmann, of the Fireman's Fund, was 
married last week to Martha Rose, of this city. 

Chapman & Newman, who were appointed general agents for 
the American Fire Insurance Company of Philadelphia, some 
time ago, will begin operations for the company on July 5th. 

* * * 

Henry J. Powell, of Louisville, Ky., president of the National 
Association of Life Underwriters, was entertained by officers 
and members of the Inland Empire Life Underwriters' Asso- 
ciation at Spokane, Wash., on July 5th, and as a direct result of 
his address, it is announced there will be a delegation to the 
annual convention in Chicago next October. 

There was a representative gathering at noon in the stone 
room of the Silver Grill, where C. H. McCoy, general agent of 
the Equitable Life, and president of the local association, was 
toastmaster. Following a well-appointed luncheon, Mr. McCoy 
introduced Mr. Powell, who was enthusiastically received. 



The best kind of underwear for summer use is found at 

the Deimel Store, 176 Sutter street, where fabrics of linen mesh 
of highest quality are tc be had. This underwear has many 
merits, among them that of not becoming chilly when moist 
from perspiration. It is cool enough for warm weather and 
warm enough for cool weather. It is durable, agreeable to the 
skin, comfortable and always well fitting. Measurements art 
taken at the store and preserved there, so that customers, when 
out of town, may order new supplies merely by sending their 
orders with their names. The name of Deimel has become 
synonymous with satisfaction in under-garments for young and 
old. 



J. Spaulding & Co., carpet beaters, are the pioneer steam 

machine carpet beaters in San Francisco. They make a specialty 
of relaying carpets, and give special attention to carpet dyeing. 
The office and works are located at 353-357 Tehama street 
Telephones Douglas 3084 and Home J 2347. Immediate re- 
sponse to 'phone calls. 



For Sale. — 1910 Winton Automobile. Perfect conditior. 

fully equipped. Warner Speedometer ; top ; glass front ; clock 
tire irons; trunk rack; Prest-o-Lite tank; electric and oil lamp- 
two horns — bulb and electric; two tire covers; two extra tire: 
two extra tubes. Address, Owner, 21 Sutter Street. 'Pho; 
Kearny 3594. 



Ocean Shore Railroad 

"Reaches the Beaches" 

THINK IT OVER 



This is perhaps the only trip about San Francisco 
that YOU have never taken. Yet the very one 
YOU should have taken long ago. 

A DAY'S OUTING 

SCENICALLY BEAUTIFUL 

and 

CLIMATICALLY DELIGHTFUL 



Daily 



Leave San Francisco 
Return San Francisco 



8:10 or 10:00 A. M. 
1:15 or 5:00 P. M. 



Snndav Leave San Francisco,8:10, 10:00 A.M. 1:50 P. M. 
y Return San Francisco, 1:15, 5:00, 6:50 P. M. 



Depot: 12th and Mission Streets 

Telephone Market 46 



Low Excursion 
Rates 



Observation 
Cars 



Phone Franklin 6322 


Home Pnone C 2563 


DOUAT & FENTON 


ELECTRICIANS 


MOTOR EXPERTS 


Wiring Supplies 


Installations Repairs 


136 EDDY STREET near 


Mason San Francisco 



Murphy Grant & Company 

■Wholesale Dry Goods Furnishing Goods 

Notions White Goods Laces 



N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets. San Francisco. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER. 



14O0 to 1460 Fourth St., San Francisco. Telephone Market 30H 
Private Exchange Conntotiof all Department* 



INVERNESS 



The most beautiful Summer 
Outing Home In America, 

where sea and pine meet, two 

hours from San Francisco, thro' 
tall redwoods of Marin. Delight- 
fully wooded villa lots overlooking 
Tomales Bay, only $200; %20 down, 
$7.50 monthly, no interest. Go 

with us to see this property. 

Call or write for catalogue. 

C. M.Wooster Co 

702 Market St. 



30 



POPULAR HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS. 



July 15, 1911. 




Fitch Mountain Tavern 

NOW OPEN 



Three hours rom San Francisco, on Russian river. Two miles 
of fine boating and bathing; livery and auto; hunting and fishing; 
dancing; good music; raise our berries, fruit, etc.; big fireplace; 
no bar. One and one-half miles from Healdsburg; 'bus meets 
trains. $3 a day, 512 to IIS per week. Special rates to families. 
Trout hatchery in connection. 

A. M. EWING, Healdsburg 

Readers when communicating with this resort will please mention 
the News Letter. 



CASA DEL REY 

SANTA CRUZ CAL. 

300-Room Fireproof Hotel. 

Large and well-appointed 
Grill Room facing the 
Beach. 

Everything new and first-class. 

AN UP-TO-DATE AND MODERN HOTEL 



Anderson Springs 

The springs that did the business in Lake County last year. Now 
open. The greatest resort for health and pleasure; the only natural 
mineral steam baths in Lake County. Natural hot sulphur and 
1 ron Baths. Board — $10 to $14 per week. No extra charge for 
baths. How to reach th* 1 Springs — Take Oakland ferry at 7:40 
a. m., or S. P. train to Calistoga, arrive 11:30 for lunch; Spiers 
stage to springs; arrive at Anderson Springs at 4 p. m., distance 
21 miles. Fare, $7 round trip from San Francisco. Address all com- 
munications to MISS ROSE ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Mld- 
dietown, Lake County, Cal. 

NOTE. — Best route for autos is via steamer to Vallejo, thence 
through Napa, Calistoga and Mlddletown. Perfect roads all the way. 



Make LAKE COUNTY by the Scenic Route 

The most comfortable way to make Lake County Is by Wm. Spier's 
stage line over the best mountain road in Cal. Grand scenery; easy 
carriages; careful drivers; round trip from San Francisco to Harbin, 
Anderson and Mira Vista. $7; to Adams, Seiglers; Bonanza, Ho- 
bergs. Howard, Astorg, Spiers and Glenbrook, $9. Stages leave 
Calistoga 11:30 a. m., Sundays excepted. Half hour for lunch at 
Calistoga. Fifty pounds baggage allowed. Automobiles furnished 
when desired. Tickets on sale at Southern Pacific Office. 



Locate your family and enjoy week-end visits at 

Hotel Del Monte 

Pacific Grove Hotel Pebble Beach Lodge Rancho Del Monte 

All under (be same management and every guest entitled to all Del Monle privileges 
and attractions, including GOLFING, MOTORING. TENNIS. BATHING. FISHING. 
ARCHERY and every outdoor sport. Take Del Monte Express going Friday. Saturday 
and Sunday, leaving San Francisco 8:05 a. rn. or 2 p. m.. arriving Del Monte 11 -.50 a.m. 



or 5:*3 p. m. 



H. R. WARNER, Manager 



PARAISO 

HOT SPRINGS 



Now's the Time to Visit 
California's Real Paradise 



Weather and scenery unsurpassed. Only 4 hours 
from San Francisco. Wonderful natural hot soda 
and sulphur; guaranteed for rheumatism, liver, kid- 
ney and all stomach troubles. New garage. Expert 
masseurs. Rates $12 to $16, including baths. 

Round trip $6.35, including auto. Roads perfect, 
autos already running daily. 



Leave Third and Townsend 8:05 A. M. First and 
Broadway, Oakland, 7:17 A. M. 



Booklets Peck-Judah; Bryan's 149 Montgomery Street or 



H. H. McGOWAN, Proprietor and Manager 

MONTEREY COUNTY 



The ANCHORAGE 

The Most Beautiful Spot In the Santa Cruz Mountains, 
for health and pleasure. First-class table, cottages, tents, tennis, 
croquet, dancing, fishing, swimming, etc.; 50 acres redwood, pine 
and madrone; altitude 1900 feet; rates $9 and $11. Meets trains by 
appointment af. Alma Station, S. P.; round trip from San Francisco, 
$2.50. Address 

CLAUDE C. MOORE, Patchin. Santa Clara Co. 
Tel. Alma 57. 



BEACH HILL INN 



SANTA CRUZ. 



NOW OPEN. 



Popular family resort overlooking beach. Address: 

MISS A. PORTER. Santa Cruz. Cal. Phone Santa Cruz 238. 



HOWARD SPRINGS 

LAKE COUNTY. 42 MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Lithia for kidneys; hot iron bath, 110 degrees, for rheumatism. The 
waters of the Hot Magnesia Spring have a wonderful record in the 
cure of stomach trouble. $12 to $18 per week. J. W. LAYMANCE, 
Prop., Howard Springs, Lake County. 



TENTS and FLAGS 

Why not buy your FLAGS from people who make them and save ibe Middle Man's 

profit. Wc have a large stock of FLAGS to select from and are convinced that our 

prices are the lowest. 

WEEKS-HOWE-EMERSON COMPANY 

51 Market Street Sao Francisco, Cal. 



July 15, 1911. 



POPULAR HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS. 



31 




THE QUEEN OF LAKE COUNTY RESORTS 

Highland Springs 

OPEN THE YEAR ROUND.. New and strictly first-class man- 
agement. Information and booklets regarding Highland Springs 
may be obtained at the Peck-Judah Free Information Bureau. 7S9 
Market street. For particulars, address W. H. MARSHALL, 
Proprietor, Highland Springs, Lake County, Cal. 



TALLAC and 
BROCKWAY 



Lake Tahoe 



The scenic resorts that have made 
Lake Tahoe famous. Open June 1st, 
under same management as in past 
years. Fishing season opens June 
1st; June fishing always best. 

LAWRENCE & COMSTOCK 
Tallac, Cal. and Brockway, Cal. 



The Peninsula Hotel 



"A Hotel in a Garden" 



San Mateo 



California 



Surrounded by every comfort, con- 
venience, and a cuisine equal to 
any found in America : : : : 



Rates on application 



JAS. H. DOOL1TTLE. Manager 



LAKE COUNTY AUTOMOBILE 
TRANSPORTATION CO. 

I STAGES from PIETA 
to HIG111.AX1> SPRINi i il.LE, SODA 

RAY. BARTLBTT id UPPER I.AKIv Fine mountain 

road. Time for lunch at Pi-Ma. Charges on aul xtra in 

addition to i 

ern Pacific i: fc«t St.. 

or address this Oil 



Plummer's Solid Comfort Couch Hammock 

THE CLIMAX OF REPOSE— A PARAGON OF LUXURY Perfect 

action. For practicability, d 
ill similar devices. I lall or write for 




cLXl "' TENTS, CAMP FURNITURE, ETC, 

WEST OF THE ROCKIES 

W. A. Plummer Manufacturing Co. 

PINE AND FRONT STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO 
Home C 1971 Kearny 5560 Send for Illustrated Catalogue 



Hotel del Coronado 



Motto: "BEST OF EVERYTHING" 
Most Delightful Climate on Earth 



AMERICAN PLAN 

Summer Rates— $3.50 per day and upward 



i boats from the hotel meet passengers from the north on 
the arrival of the Pacific Coast S. S. Company steamers. Golf, 
Tennis, Polo and other outdoor sports every day in the year. New 
700-foot ocean pier, for fishing. Boating and bathing are the very 
best Send for booklet to MORGAN ROSS, Manager, Coronado 

Cal.. or see 11. F\ NORCROSS. Agent. 334 So. Spring St., 
301 7. 



Hotel BEN LOMOND 



AND COTTAGES 



At Ben Lomon.l Iieautifully located 

^n the .- 

- 
- 

; 

CI PS. 



32 



POPULAR HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS. 



July 15, 1911. 



At a lecture a well-known authority on economics men- 
tioned the fact that in some parts of America the number of 
men was considerably larger than that of women, and he added 
humorously, "I can, therefore, recommend to the ladies to emi- 
grate to that part." A young lady seated in one of the last 
rows of the auditorium got up and, full of indignation, left the 
room rather noisily, whereupon the lecturer remarked: "I did 
not mean that it should be done in such a hurry!" — Judge. 



"What are her days at home?" "Oh, a society leader 

has no days at home any more. Nowadays she has her tele- 
phone hours." — Smart Set. 




The favorite resort for 
tourists, sight seers, 
health and pleasure- 
seekers. A greater 
variety of mineral 
waters than in any 
other place in Amer- 
ica. The only natural 
mineral, steam and 
hammam bath, having 
great curative quali- 
ties. We positively 
cure rheumatism and 
stomach trouble. The 
hotel and bath houses have been thoroughly renovated and put in 
excellent shape for this season. Our table will be supplied with the 
best the market affords. The road from Clover-dale has been 
widened and put in splendid order for staging and automobiles. All 
kinds of amusements, including dancing, every evening. Round- 
trip ticket good for six months via Cloverdale, $8. Good hunting 
and fishing. Rates, ?2.50 to $3 per day. $14 to $16 per week. Child- 
ren from $7 to $9 per week. Special rates for families and long- 
termers. For further information, call on Peck-Judah Information 
Bureau. 789 Market street, or address R. H. CURRY, Proprietor, 
The Geysers, Cal. 




The ABBEY 



MILL VALLEY 



FirSt-claes hotel; tent cottages with hot and cold running 

water; rates 312.50 and up; fine tennis court. Address 

Box 786 or Phone 761, Mill Valley 



SEIGLER 



HOT bPRINGS, Lake County. Natural hot baths for rheumatism 
stomach trouble, malaria, etc. Swimming; pond, baths free $10 to 
*14 a week. Automobile livery. MISS M. SPAULD1NG, Seiuler 
Lake County, Cal. Information PECK-JUDAH CO., 789 Market 
street, San Francisco. 



HOTEL BON AIR 



SPECIAL SATURDAY NIGHT DINNER 



6 TO 8 O'CLOCK 



Ready for guests under new management. 
Fifty minutes from San Francisco. 



M. A. SMYTH E, Lessee and Manager. 
Larkspur P. 0„ ESCALLE, Marin County Phone: San Rafael 2431 



HARBIN SPRINGS 



NEW MANAGEMENT; NEWLY FURNISHED THROUGHOUT; 
NEW SERVICE; EXCELLENT TABLE. Our own garden, orchard 
and dairy. Famous hot and cold curative mineral waters free to 
guests. Masseur. Roger Cornell. Trout fishing; deer hunting; gym- 
nasium, livery, drives, trails, automobile trips, hotel, cottages, tents. 
Room, board and baths, $12 per week and up. Inquire at S. P. Of- 
fices; Examiner, 74 Geary St.; Peck-Judah's, 789 Market street; or 
BOOTH, CARR & BOOTH, Proprietors, Harbin Springs, Lake Co. 




Hotel 
Belleclaire 



BROADWAY 
at 77th ST. 



SUBWAY 
79th Street 



I^^TT^* 5 New York City 



HEADQUARTERS FOR CALIFORNIANS 

Thoroughly Modern and Fireproof 
FAMILY— TRANSIENT HOTEL 

Rates: with bath $2.50 per day up 

ELMER F. WOODBURY, Prop. 
Formerly of the Maryland, Pasadena Hotel St. Mark, Oakland 



Hotel Westminster 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. Fourth and Main Sts. 

American Plan Reopened. 

Rates per day, $2.50, rooms without bath 
Rooms with bath, $3, $3.50 and $4. 

European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up. 
"With bath $1.50 and up. 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



Hotel Sacramento 

SACRAMENTO. CALA 

Elegant new fire-proof construction. Service as perfect as 
expert management can produce. 

ALBERT BETTENS. Proprietor. 



HOTEL de REDWOOD 

IN THE HEART OF THE REDWOODS TWO 
AND ONE-HALF MILES FROM LAUREL 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS 

P.O. Address WRIGHTS. R. F. D.. CAL. Telephone 98 lo $12 per week 

J. E. SEROY, Lessee and Manager Meet parties it train on notification 




JMaHUAuI July to. I*M 



*& !Sil c '*oo 




'TER 



Devoted to the Leading Intereete of California and the Pacific Coaet. 




VOL. LXXXII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 22, 1911 



Ni. 3 



Th« SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 

London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements, or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



If at first you don't succeed in agreeing on a fair site, 

vote, vote again. 

That troubled and troublesome little republic of Hayti 

has gone off on another tangent — black-and-tangent. 

It would be a fine idea to turn loose that soul-camera on 

John D. Rockefeller and make an extra long exposure. 

If the lightning's wayward levin is going to strike down 

innocent golfers, we shall have to provide insulated clubs. 

To date, the location of the Panama-Pacific Exposition 

site seems to be pretty definitely established up in the air. 

Actress Ethel Barrymore has no use for babies in the 

theatres. Most actresses have no use for babies anywhere. 

Paymaster Pippin, of Mare Island, appears to have been 

a peach of a financier when he handled other people's money. 

Another little war rages in the official household of 

Goodman Taft. It is not a sham battle, but a Wickersham 
battle. 

If it was a loan, the Oakland Assessor went about the 

negotiations in a manner calculated to attract the attention of 
the police. 

The insurgent Republican closely resembles the familiar 

little insect which, when you put your finger on him, is some- 
where else. 

The Illinois gir! who has been asleep for three months 

opens her eyes long enough to yawn and say: "Please Don't 
Wake Me Up." 

Maybe a little benzoate of soda would help to keep 

things from fermenting so powerfully in "Doc" Wiley's depart- 
ment of the Government. 

A serious train wreck in Germany serves incidentally to 

inform the world that trains really do run fast enough under 
Government ownership to do damage. 

The way women are going in for athletics, boxing in- 
cluded, it seems that we would better give them the ballot 
peaceably before they take it by force. 

The exact center of population for the United States 

pauses in its journey toward California, and is now in Indiana, 
where it will officially rest until the next census. 

Ten thousand dollars is the limit proposed by the Senate 

upon a Senator's campaign expenditures. Brother Works, of 
Los Angeles, would get a trunkful of togas inside that limit and 
have enough left to keep him in ice water for many sessions. 



So a turtle caught near Boston coughs up a penny dated 

1770. M — h'm. This means that the fake center of the nation 
is now located in Massachusetts on the River Charles. 

The mightiest insurgent of them all went to Africa and 

brought back tales of the dik-dik. The chief Wisconsin surger, 
La Follette, specializes in "Dick-Dick" correspondence. 

Brother Ruef devotes some of his enforced leisure to ar- 
ranging things so that prisoners can help themselves. That's 
what a good many of them, Ruef included, are in jail for. 

Lost: One perfectly good municipal "lid"; was blown 

off by gas generated through political fermentation; finder may 
keep same, but owner would like to know where it landed. 

The East pays $3,400 for a carload of California grapes. 

Never mind: California will pay a lot more than that for a less 
quantity of "grape" with French labels that was made in New 
York. 

When you think how the town was governed under 

Schmitz and what McCarthy is doing to it, you just can't help 
sympathizing with Abe Ruef's reflections on the injustice of 
justice. 

Governor Johnson's Board of Control is whittling down 

expenses on items like office stationery and bird-seed, but what 
it is doing about the real costs of Government remains a Capitol 
mystery. 

There is one kind of open shop that the labor adminis- 
tration of San Francisco stands for with enthusiasm — the booze 
shop and the kind of shop that flourishes up the side streets of 
the North End. 

The latest American navy cannon will shoot over the 

horizon. Thus we see that universal peace is near at hand. 
When war becomes as deadly as it is expensive, then humanity 
will quit warring. 

Dalton, having greedily "taken his," has now "got his." 

The next bribe-seeking officer in these parts to go hunting will 
be careful to find out in advance whether or not the intended 
victim of hold-uppery carries a weapon. 

Reading that a hotel clerk has been held up by a robber 

wearing automobile goggles, the touring motorist is not dis- 
tressed ; he remembers how often the person with the auto gog- 
gles has been held up by a hotel clerk, wearing no disguise 
whatever. 

A young athlete of New York, whose specialty is long- 
distance swimming, advises girls to "cut out corsets and love" 
if they would be as she is. But most girls will stick to the 
whalebones and the handiwork of the pudgy little person with 
the bow and arrow. 

Lightning hits a Colorado lady, and undresses her to 

the last stitch without injury to her person. Perhaps some day 
we shall so far harness the mysterious electric fluid that it will 
dress a lady in the same way — and what, then, will become of 
a joke that has endured for ages ? 



tt EM T © IIU A L 



COMMENT 



One thing alone is clear in all the 
San Francisco's turbid muddle of San Francisco's 

Water Question. water question. This is, that Spring 

Valley has the city so tied up — 
roped, thrown and hog-tied — that we are as far as we ever 
were from owning our water plant or from getting a Sierra 
source of supply. 

Eventually another thing will be made plain to the honest 
burghers : that the means by which this situation has been 
brought about and is maintained is the Hetch-Hetchy myth. 
That project could not have served the interests of Spring Val- 
ley any better if it had been conceived and engineered by 
Spring Valley itself. Here enters again the vagrant, persistent 
suspicion that possibly the Tuolumne proposition came from 
precisely that quarter. The prize is a rich one, very well worth 
fighting for, plotting for. scheming for. Spring Valley knows its 
way through the dark alleys of politics without a guide. 

As the matter stands to-day, the city has only a bureau per- 
mit for the use of the Lake Eleanor and Hetch-Hetchy source. 
Even that right may be taken away from it upon the strength of 
a report from the Government board now at work on the case 
to the effect that San Francisco does not need the waters of the 
Tuolumne shed — that there are other and better sources avail- 
able. And even if the permit were made, an indefeasible grant, 
there are adverse private claims in the way of ownership of 
lands and water claims absolutely necessary to the utilization 
of Lake Eleanor and Hetch-Hetchy. 

After City Engineer Manson, midwife and wet nurse of the 
Hetchy-Hetchy plan, has declared that there is no escape from 
buying out — or off — Ham Hall and his Cherry Creek rights, 
comes a power company with a suit to quiet title to all Hall's 
claims, asserting a prior and superior right therein. Hall, says 
this claimant may own the lands but not any of the water rights 
appurtenant thereto. The large sum arranged to be paid to 
Hall for the Cherry Creek rights cannot legally be handed over 
to him untii he is out of litigation and has a clear title ready to 
deliver. That means another year or two of inaction, with 
Spring Valley's cinch tightening and its price mounting steadily. 

Meanwhile, the city's growth is checked unless it will concede 
all that Spring Valley demands, either of price to purchase or 
price to pay for water. That corporation has reason to be pleased 
with the prospect as well as with the existing situation. The 
outcome is assured for it unless the Hetch-Hetchy chimera can 
be disposed of and the way opened for a bona fide Sierra propo- 
sition with a clear and immediate title to deliver with no Gov- 
ernment strings or drawbacks on it, no Ham Hall claims to be 
put forward. 

In this further delay it may be profitable for the citizens 
whose money and rights are involved, to take a look at the ac- 
tivities and inactivities of City Attorney Long. This official 
has no concern with the dispute between Hall and his adverse 
claimants. The city will not intervene in that proceeding. But 
the City Attorney is deeply concerned to keep Hetch-Hetchy 
blocking the door against any other Sierra proposition. Ham 
Hall's law suits may delay it as long as the lawyers can con- 
trive, and as the courts will permit, but Long will not admit 
that there is any other Siena source. It would be interesting 
to know what he would do and say if the Government should 
finally take away its permit and make the Tuolumne source 
forever impossible. 

As a recent specimen of City Attorney Long's course and an 
example of what he thinks are the duties and functions of his 
office, consider the following. It was drawn up by him, or at 
his Older, and sent out upon his authority to improvement clubs 
throughout the city for adoption. Read it : 



WHEREAS, the residents of portions of the city of San Francisco and 
of the other cities and counties about the Bay of San Francisco are now 
suffering from an inadequate water supply, and the growth and develop- 
ment of said cities is being retarded thereby, and 

WHEREAS, a water supply from the Sierra Nevada Mountains in addi- 
tion to all available nearby sources is necessary in order to provide for 
the future need of said cities, and 

WHEREAS, the people of San Francisco, after long discussion and con- 
sideration have selected the source of water supply commonly known as 
the "Tuolumne River and Hetch-Hetchy Source," as being best Butted to 
their needs, and large amounts of money have been expended by said 
City in connection with the acquisition of such source of supply, it is 
therefore 

RESOLVED BY that in the 

opinion of its members, the people of San Francisco are unalterably in 
favor of the acquisition of said Hetch-Hetchy source of water supply and 
are opposed to the substitution of any other proposed source of supply 
therefor, and that the reasonably prospective needs of the cities about the 
Bay of San Francisco are such as to require the acquisition and use of 
all the unused water In the watershed of the Tuolumne River, including 
such as may be empounded in the Hetch-Hetchy Valley when the proposed 
dam is there built 

RESOLVED, further, that the officers of the City and County of San 
Francisco are hereby requested and called upon to do all in their power 
to preserve for the use of San Francisco and the other cities about the 
Bay of San Francisco the proposed Hetch-Hetchy reservoir as a part of 
their mountain source of water supply. 

Is the city's law officer so concerned in the water question 
that he must go out campaigning on his own account at the city's 
expense for this or that or the other water proposition? 

There is a curious likeness between the City Attorney's meth- 
ods and those employed by Spring Valley, which is also busy 
spreading its own propaganda among the same bodies that 
Long solicits. Perhaps they watch and learn from each other. 
Perhaps 

Anything is possible where there is as much to win or lose as 
in this water question. As many millions as are at stake in this 
affair have no conscience. Anything will be done, it appears, 
to keep the people from getting a square chance to accept or 
turn down a legitimate, good-faith, cheap and certain Sierra 
proposition. That is to say, the Hetch-Hetchy obstacle will be 
kept in the road until Spring Valley has got what it wants — 
unless some day a befooled and betrayed public wakes up and 
takes the matter into its own hands. Then the Sierra Blue 
Lakes project — thirty million dollars cheaper and seven years 
nearer than Hetch-Hetchy, and with an unclouded title — will 
find its way into San Francisco. 



The "Apostle of 
Health Industry." 



Pure food and drug laws may oper- 
ate to limit the frauds practiced 
upon a simple and credulous people 
by the medicine fakers, but they do 
not in any way check those same malpractitioners from hood- 
winking the same people into buying harmless nostrums in the 
belief that they will cure anything from corns to consumption. 
The medicines — God save the mark! — must be registered and 
labeled according to law, but there is nothing to stop the fakers 
from the grossest misrepresentation in their advertising — noth- 
ing to keep the publications that will take such money for such 
purposes from printing the bald lies and the foolish exaggera- 
tions without which the "apostles of health" would have to 
go to work and earn honest livings. It is still the age of de- 
ception — immensely profitable deception. 

Aforetime the "apostle of health" traveled with a small cir- 
cus tent, a band and a corps of singers and entertainers and 
"bouncers." He wore a sealskin overcoat to his heels and yards 
of gold chain with ounces of diamonds. He made a fine, fat 
thing of it. But he was a "piker" compared to his successor of 
to-day. The discovery that printers' ink and white paper would 
sell water to thousands where only hundreds could be reached 
in the circus tent revolutionized the "apostle of health" indus- 
try. It has made and is making millionaires of those who use 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



A Sad Lesson 
in Politics. 



it with common shrewdness; the older school was content with 
tens of thousands. 

So the press — bulwark of popular liberties and guardian of 
popular morals — is filled with the monstrous claims and profes- 
sions of the "apostle of health." He and his silly sugar-and- 
water remedies are made in print to heal the unhealable and all 
but raise the dead. The blind see after taking three packages 
of his factory-made compounds; the lame throw away their 
crutches and the mortally ill get up from years-long helpless- 
ness and dance and sing and write fervid letters to the "apos- 
tle's" astute press agent. All of this one may read — has hard 
work to keep from reading — in the rich and powerful journals 
that labor so unselfishly and devotedly in the interest of the 
poor, dear public. The "apostle" has the money and pays the 
price that puts the journalistic conscience to sleep in the cash 
drawer. 

The hard part of it all comes in the cases of the actual suf- 
ferers from serious disease whom the "apostle of health" mis- 
leads and beguiles and keeps away from the genuine sources 
of relief until it is too late. There ought to be some way to 
protect them, but there is none in sight now. It is a problem 
for the sociologist, the philanthropist, the economist. 

SB- 
It is hard to believe that the work- 
ingmen of San Francisco, union or 
non-union, approve of the McCarthy 
campaign which is making of San 
Francisco a city without semblance of morals or vestige of re- 
straint. Surely the thoughtful toiler knows who pays the human 
toll for this saturnalia of "pleasure," this reign of "liberty," 
where the army of Bacchantes, the hard-eyed, white-faced, red- 
lipped women, comes from. 

The price of this kind of politics is high and slow to pay. 
Long after McCarthy has ceased to be Mayor, and after he is no 
longer a force in this community for good or evil, there will be 
men and women in the stews, in the jails, in the asylums, living 
witnesses of his "open town" campaign of 1911. Taxpayers 
will yield many and many thousand dollars through many years 
for the harvesting of the crop that is now being sown from Ber- 
nal Heights to the bay, from the ocean beach to the Barbary 
Coast. Hundreds of fathers will work and sweat and mothers 
will weep and wait and pray, hoping where there is no hope, 
while in shame and sorrow they pay their share of the cost of 
trying to put McCarthy back into power. 

The "Paris of America" was long in arriving, but it is here, 
only one doubts if even the supposedly wicked French capital 
would stand for what goes on madly, merrily, with license and 
sanction in its McCarthyville imitation. We outdo them all. 
The "lid" is lost. The police is merely a means and agency 
of politics. We are privileged — nay, we are bidden — to gam- 
ble our heads off, drink them off, dance them off, carouse them 
off. If we don't do that, if we are sober and save our money, 
the footpad and the burglar are free to mash our heads and take 
our purses. The police are busy seeing to it that they do the 
right kind of politics and that nobody interferes with the dis- 
orderly course of things and people and dives. 

The day is twenty-four hours long for the purposes of pub- 
lic debauchery and lechery and what not of sodden "pleasure." 
As long as man or woman has money and can stand up or swal- 
low, he or she may drink and dance and hurrah. The music 
goes from sun-up to sun-up — if it is the kind of music pro- 
tected and privileged by a thrifty administration. The town 
goes asleep when it can no longer order or buy. Anything goes 
and everybody goes as far as he likes. 

And all this is happening on the pretense that there must be 
no discrimination against the working class. The laborer must 



have the right and the chance to dance how and as long as he 
pleases. His womenkind must have the right and the opportu- 
nity to drink in "cafes" just as much as the rich. It is a kind of 
equality that looks well in a political platform, but writhes in 
hideousness as it is written in the grisly records of municipal 
vice and crime. 

3B- 
It is well known that the State and 
The Tax on Labor. County taxation comes heaviest on 

the man who owns a little home — 
the thrifty wage-earner. It is an unequal taxation, for the man of 
wealth, who owns vast acreage, always, through some subter- 
fuge or other, evades his just proportion of taxation, and it is 
the one aim and duty of the progressive Republican party to see 
that taxation is so equalized that the rich will bear a burden in 
proportion to the rich man's ownership of this world's goods. 

In addition to the regular taxation, assessed on the individual 
by State and county, there is a vast amount of taxation which 
may be denominated as a "blind tax." This tax is the tax which 
is laid upon society in general and the poor in particular by 
society in the form of dues to societies or fraternal orders for 
the purpose of guaranteeing rights which should come to the 
public as benefits as a matter of course. 

Of these, the taxes, which are placed upon union labor by the 
bosses of the Labor Trust, are the heaviest. The Carpenters' 
Unions of San Francisco are paying an indirect tax of this kind 
which amounts to over ten per cent of their wages, and there is 
no accounting in detail of the uses to which the money of union 
labor is being put by the bosses who have been successful in 
continuing themselves, after the style of Diaz, in power in- 
definitely and term after term. 

Labor is becoming tired of taxation of all kinds and will 
throw off the yoke of the ne'er-do-wells at the head and demand 
an accounting. There is much grinding of teeth and grumbling 
in the ranks of union labor, and the union men who are default- 
ing on their dues are many. 

There is still another item that is interesting union men. The 
walking delegates of the Building Trades Council are all in the 
employ of San Francisco as Supervisors, or on some commis- 
sion, and drawing salaries from both ends — $7 a day as walking 
delegates, $45 per month buggy hire, in addition to fat salaries 
from the city, while hundreds of mechanics are out of work and 

contributing to these same professional labor union job holders. 

38r 

Men who, like old Father Grimes, 
Good Roads and persist in wearing their coats "all 

Farm Values. buttoned down before with hooks 

and eyes," find a deal of comfort 
in protesting against spending public money for the betterment 
of highways, and they say it is a "craze that is both infectious 
and contagious, and if not cured very soon, every community 
will be financially ruined." But they are the loons of the com- 
monwealth. Good roads building is not a proposition of the 
feeble-minded. It is the application of the soundest principles 
of economic science and business sense. No business enterprise 
is handicapped by improving the public highways, and the 
social establishment of every community is made strong in 
ratio to the public facilities for inter-communication. There is 
no such mental ailment as "good roads craze," nor could good 
roads construction become a "hobby." 

But if good roads building is a "craze," or if it has become a 
"hobby," let it run its course until every public road in the 
United States is fit for vehicles to roll their wheels over. Any- 
way, that is the sentiment in every State and in every com- 
munity in the nation. Not only in the Eastern and Middle- 
Western States has the "craze" seized upon the people, but 
every one of the Western and Southern States are cultivating 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 



the "hobby," and perhaps it may surprise not a few to know 
that Texas has the "craze" in its worst form, and the whole 
State is under the influence of the infection. A plan has been 
agreed upon in Texas to construct good highways on a scale 
that California might borrow for her use while spending that 
$18,000,000 appropriation. The Texas plan provides, as a 
starter, for a continuous highway for vehicles, extending from 
Galveston to Red River, on the northern border, 630 miles, and 
through the famous "black land belt" the road will be double 
width. This is to be a trunk line, and the basis of a State-wide 
system, except that the lateral roads, as well as the trunk line 
itself, are to be located with reference to accommodating the 
agricultural sections of the State by supplying them with good 
roads to the markets. And in this connection it may be said 
that the promoters have figured out the advantages of good 
roads to the farmer closer than has any other State — that is to 
say, under the existing condition of the public highways in 
Texas, it costs the farmer to deliver his produce at a market 
five miles distant 43 cents per ton per mile, and when the high- 
ways are brought up to a high standard of excellence the cost 
will be reduced to seven cents per ton per mile. 

When the lateral roads are connected with the trunk line, 
50,000,000 acres of the most fertile farming regions of the 
State will have the advantages accruing from good roads at 
"their door," so to speak. These several sections of farming 
lands market 3,500,000 tons of produce annually, which, with 
good roads, could be marketed even ten miles distant at less 
than 5 cents per ton per mile if transported in motor cars. It 
will be remembered that the 43 cents per ton per mile means 
by animal-drawn vehicles over inferior roads, and that the re- 
duction in cost to 7 cents per ton per mile means over good 
roads, but with animal-drawn wagons. But the most interest- 
ing figures given to show what advantages would accrue to the 
agricultural lands of Texas by an extended system of good 
highways are those which show that the lands contiguous to 
the highways would increase value fully $10,000 per mile. This 
would make an increase in the value of farms situated or near 
the improved highways all of $400,000,000, besides a saving 
from $7,000,000 to $10,000,000 in the cost of marketing farm 
products. But in reality the enterprise contemplates a system 
of 40,000 miles of good roads. On the other hand, the ramifi- 
cations of the system will not include the cattle or lumber re- 
gions, thus confining the system strictly to the agricultural sec- 
tions, which embrace not over one-third of the area of the 
State. Now what is possible, for good roads to do for Texas is 
equally possible for good roads to do for California, if the 
difference in road mileage and farm acreage are considered. 

A new and altogether business-like 
For a Greater City. campaign for a greater San Fran- 
cisco has been inaugurated by rep- 
resentative men of the strongest financial, commercial and in- 
dustrial enterprises of the city under the name of the Federation 
of Greater San Francisco Association. It is not to be an orna- 
mental, but a working association, imbued with the spirit of 
progress. The purpose to be accomplished is in harmony with 
the sentiment of every other large business and social center in 
the United States, for it is in the mind of every city to extend 
its border lines so as to include in its political and commercial 
bounds such contiguous territory as would be benefited by such 
consolidation. Experience has demonstrated to very many of 
the larger centers of trade and traffic, as well as to the terri- 
tory absorbed that under modern methods of rapid transit and 
the advantages accruing from the centralization of the agencies 
and forces of merchandise accumulation and distribution con- 
duce to greater business activity and social convenience, not 
only of the consolidated parts, but of a large area lying be- 



yond. San Francisco is the recognized metropolis of the 
Pacific Coast country of not only the United States, but of the 
Latin Republics and Canada as well. 

The geographical location of San Francisco, with reference to 
the natural trade currents between the western slope of the 
Americas, as between themselves and the Orient, makes her 
the prospective New York of the Far West and of the Far 
East. But to accomplish her destiny, San Francisco should 
not hesitate to go forward in the right direction or delay the 
consummation of the mighty work in hand, which is the creation 
of a greater and a still greater San Francisco, not only in area, 
but in population and volume of business as well, by absorbing 
or gathering in of all the Bay cities, reaching to the north as 
far as San Rafael, and to the south as far as San Mateo, taking 
in Richmond, Berkeley, Oakland, Alameda and San Lorenzo. 
That is to say, let San Rafael be the northern boundary, San 
Mateo the southern boundary, and San Lorenzo, Alameda, Oak- 
land, Berkeley and Richmond the eastern boundary limits of 
greater San Francisco. 

The greatest objection to consolidation that has been raised 
by the towns on the east shore of the bay is that they are sepa- 
rated from San Francisco by several miles of deep water, and 
hence are not nor could they be contiguous territory to San 
Francisco. Very true, they are separated by a wide expanse of 
water, and have no connection other than by ferry boats, but 
some of the best engineers hold that it would be no very great 
engineering feat to throw a suspension bridge across the bay 
via Goat Island, and that such a structure will be a reality in 
the near future there is no doubt, thus connecting the east and 
west shores of the bay by a permanent roadway of concrete, 
steel and iron. But aside from all that, it is worth while to re- 
member that fully 100,000 people pass in and out of San Fran- 
cisco proper every day from and to the regions that are included 
in the consolidation plan; and moreover, that $500,000 of money 
earned in business enterprises and in the trades in San Fran- 
cisco daily is carried to the territory to be annexed, and is not 
accounted for to the credit of San Francisco in the totals of 
the income and expenditure accounts of the city's exhibits. But 
there is still another reason why the outlying territory should 
be anxious to become a part and parcel of Greater San Fran- 
cisco. Real estate values everywhere within the confines of the 
new boundary lines would increase greatly, for real property 
located in Greater San Francisco would participate in all the 
advantages that would accrue to the enlarged city, but in which 
advantages localities refusing to surrender their separateness 
would not only not enjoy, but very likely have to face depre- 
ciated property values. 



TRADE 




MARK 



BOORD'S 



LONDON, ENG, GINS 



DRY 



OLD TOM 



T WI LI GHT 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

Agents Pacific Coast San Francisco 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 





^■■::\7i*&.G*Jlti.b,aui/*t&mf 



There are some men who are not satisfied with just wast- 
ing their own time. — Listening to grand opera through a phono- 
graph is about as satisfying as kissing your sweetheart through 
a veil. — In these divorceful times, there would be more satisfac- 
tion in insuring one's life could it be known just what fellow 
would become the beneficiary. — Opposite conditions sometimes 
produce the same result; Sampson got into trouble by having 
his hair cut, and Absalom got into trouble by not having a hair- 
cut. — It is better to have had fisherman's luck than never to 
have fished at all. — Too close acquaintance makes one forget 
the outside beauty of a skunk. — When you find that it is im- 
possible to hold on a moment longer, it is time not to let go. — 
Life depends upon its altitude, rather than upon its length. 

It is a matter of astonishment that line upon line and 

precept upon precept will not avail nor convince a considerable 
percentage of humanity. The thing that hangs out the alluring 
bait of economy, no matter how often the claim has been ex- 
ploded, will always find a large following. In no direction is 
this truth more finally demonstrated than in fraternal insurance. 
All these organizations, honestly conceived or fraudfully pro- 
mulgated, have time out of number proved by experience their 
own weakness; but the thing that seeks to get something with- 
out paying for it listens not to the voice of reason nor the pro- 
tests of experience. They will probably continue to sow false- 
hoods and catch gudgeons until Gabriel's horn blast announces 
the end of all folly. 

Some men collect postage stamps. Others collect dogs. 

Many collect wives. A few collect children. One man, I know, 
collected mottoes or proverbs. On the first day of January, ot 
a certain year, he selected a motto out of his pile, framed it and 
hung it up. He read it over. On the following day he similarly 
absorbed another motto, and in sober earnestness he repeated 
this practice for three hundred and sixty-five consecutive days. 
Then he got married. The idea was, in its principle, a good 
one, but the companionship of a single motto would have done 
him more practical good. One rudder was enough; he over- 
worked his good motive, and was punished for the fault. 

Complaint is made of our fire alarm system. The pro- 
gress of electrical mechanics in all the branches of industrial 
pursuits has been marvelous, and we are even promised the 
abolition of the telephone girl in time to save our souls from 
eternal damnation, but we do not learn that there is much new 
in the application of positive electrical devices to get the news 
of a fire promptly to the engine house. It occurs to us that the 
street box, for one thing, needs attention, for the ordinary citi- 
zen has about as much idea where to go and get a key for the 
one nearest his domicile as he has to find the nest of a last 
year's dickey bird. 



The Seattle male worm has turned, and through the med- 
ium of "The Patriarch," a four-page paper, is fighting, not very 
prettily, it must be confessed, but right valiantly, the equal 
suffrage amendment carried in Washington by popular vote, 
last year. The irate editor declares that, although every deluded 
creature who is the peer of moulting hens voted, the decent 
portion of the "woman's suffragists" are ashamed of their own 
triumph. This editor is rather short on grammar and decency, 
but that he is deadly in earnest and mad all through there is 
no room for doubt. "A man who will sit in a convention, or 
occupy a subordinate position under a woman in authority, 
anywhere," he says, "is a degenerate." In his own vernacular, 
some woman must, surely, have done him dirt. 

Much sympathy from a certain quarter is being wasted 

upon one time Assessor Dalton, and those who laid a trap for 
his undoing are severely criticised. When dishonesty sports 
itself under the seal of official dignity, and that which has been 
made law for the protection of the public, it is the privilege 
and the duty of honest officials to drag into light the unworthy 
money mercenaries of the moment, and brand them publicly 
with their dishonor. The direct and convincing exposure of 
those who, having official relations with the public, violate 
their oaths of office and turn their positions into tools of per- 
sonal profit, is not only a duty but an important privilege. 

A contemporary complains most bitterly of the seclusion 

surrounding some of our higher city officials and of the cere- 
mony necessary to be observed in obtaining an interview. 
There is nothing in the world that a man so quickly or so deeply 
resents as to find you awfully busy when he, himself, is entirely 
at leisure, and the affable way in which he endeavors to adapt 
your condition to his own, under such circumstances, is ample 
justification for all the redoubts, breastworks and other precau- 
tions interposed by the busy man between his center of opera- 
tion and his tormentors. The man who makes social visits dur- 
ing business hours is not only an insufferable bore — he is a 
thief. 

It is refreshing to find that amid a mass that well de- 
serves censure, San Francisco's fire department is entitled to 
only approbation and praise. That this is the opinion of all 
our citizens will not be questioned. With a head full of good, 
common sense, quick to see and quick to act, honest and incor- 
ruptible, the chief, we believe, is the peer of any fire-fighter in 
the country. It is the essence of Americanism that the leader 
is always found where the occasion requires it, and that the 
spirit of the chief elevates every worker to the plane of his ac- 
tivity. No city had ever greater need of first-class men in her 
fire department than San Francisco, and no city was ever more 
favored in this respect. 

A millionaire clubman, suffering from rheumatism at his 

country residence in Menlo Park, finding that a row of stately 
pine trees temporarily obstructed his view from a bedroom win- 
dow, promptly ordered them all cut down. It took God Al- 
mighty something like one hundred years to make those trees, 
but when he began to work, he carelessly overlooked the fact 
that in the year 1911 a California gentleman was to become rich 
and rheumatic. 



£°T 



m 



ROSE CITY BEAVEI 

from Pier 40. Every 5 Days 



(By 



Steamer 



Newest, largrest and most modern 
steamships on the Coast. Rates 
are low. botn one way and round 
trip, and include berth and meals 
without further charge. Full 

information at 

■ San Francisco & Portland S. S. Co. 

384 Flood Bids.. Powell & Market Streets Phooe Keam; 

648 Market Street. Pboae Dooflas 

^ 81 Market Street. Phot* DoocUs 



i 



To Los A ngeles j 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 




The Lookeron boarded a Geary street car the other night. By 
his side sat a man who at the first sound of "fare" from the. 
conductor began laboriously to count out five pennies, with 
which he paid for his car ride. After a journey of several 
blocks, the "copper" man gathered up his bundles and de- 
parted, leaving the Lookeron and the conductor sole occupants 
of the dummy. The former turned to the official and asked, 
curiously : 

"Do you often have to take pennies as fare ?" 

"Oh, quite frequently," replied the conductor. "You see 
coppers are legal tender, and as a result cannot be refused. Re- 
minds me of a little experience I had on this same line a few 
years ago. I had an evening run, and one night I noticed a chap 
climb on the dummy and settle down in the farthest corner. 
When I made my rounds in his direction, he began to fumble 
around in his pockets, and finally unearthed five pennies, which 
he handed me with a flourish. I accepted them without any 
comment, and late that night, when it came time to cash in, I 
kept the pennies in my vest pocket, turning in a good nickel of 
my own in their place. 

"The next night my new friend boarded my car at the same 
corner, and made me a present of another five pennies, which I 
stored away with the preceding five. This interesting proceed- 
ing was duplicated night after night, and the collection in my 
vest pocket became vast and weighty. Seventy-five cents 
doesn't count for much in silver, but in coppers it assumes all 
the proportions of an opulent purse. And then one night my 
long-looked-for opportunity loomed up. 

" 'Fare !' sez I to my passenger, and he immediately began to 
tie himself in bow-knots looking for his usual supply of pennies. 
He located four right off the bat, but somehow or other he 
couldn't find the fifth. He poked into his vest, he slapped his 
sides, he dug into his coat and he conducted a series of per- 
sonal excavations in his rear pockets, but all to no avail. Fin- 
ally, with a grunt of disgust, he handed me a half dollar, and 
with fine deliberation I counted out the change in forty-five 
pennies. The expression on his face gave me more joy than 
a raise in salary." 

S S 75 

There is a certain well-known attorney in San Francisco who 
is notoriously absent-minded. And particularly hard does he 
find it to remember names. This last deficiency in an otherwise 
brilliant mind has placed him in any number of embarrassing 
predicaments, out of which, however, he manages to climb with 
amazing celerity, much to the amusement of his friends. 

His most recent escape is being told with great glee by a 
chosen few. It seems that Blank and his wife were honor 
guests at an elaborate reception given in the Palace Hotel a 
short while ago. During the evening he was on his way across 
the ballroom when he saw bearing down upon him a gentleman 
whose face was remarkably familiar, but whose cognomen had 
no answering place in his elusive memory. The situation was 
desperate, and no help in sight. Suddenly the attorney stopped 
short in his tracks and, allowing a frown of annoyance to spread 
over his face, turned to right-about face. "I'll have to make him 
think I've forgotten something," he said to himself, and away 



he went back across the big room, with his determined pursuer 
a close second. 

"Say, wait a minute," called the other, and with one last spurt 
he managed to come up with his fleeing acquaintance. Catching 
him by the arm, he whirled him about. "By Jove, you're the 
swiftest thing on feet I've run across in some time. How do 
you do," and the attorney felt his arm being pumped up and 
down. 

"Well, well," he remarked, genially, "this is a treat. I just 
remembered that my wife is waiting for me over here, and you 
know when the madam is waiting " 

"Oh, that's the reason you were in such a rush," observed his 
tormentor. "Weil, I won't keep you a minute. I just want to 
tell you that I think you handled that last case in a most mas- 
terly fashion, and congratulate you on your success," and once 
more the legal light felt his arm doing the pump-handle stunt. 

Suddenly he beheld his wife with another young lady ap- 
proaching, and that he would be supposed to carry on a series 
of introductions made itself apparent to his harassed mind. In 
desperation, he took his companion by the coat-sleeve and 
slowly walked him across the room. 

"Old man," he said, "I'm going to make a confession to you. 
There are times when my mind becomes an absolute blank, so 
far as memory is concerned, and to-night I am so afflicted. You 
will do me a great favor if you will tell me my own name," and 
he looked appealingly at the man by his side. The latter rose 
gallantly to the bait. 

"By George, that's bad," he remarked sympathetically. "You 
want to cut out the work. Your name is Horatius Blank, of 
course." 

"So it is. so it is," cried the other gratefully, "and yours — 
what is yours?" 

"George Bacon," answered George, kindly. 

The attorney whirled about as he heard his wife behind him. 

"My dear," said he, "let me present Mr. Bacon — you've heard 
me speak of Bacon, I know. Mr. Bacon, this is Mrs. Blank, and 
also Mrs. Johnson." And while the three engaged in a bit of 
social chat, Blank, after excusing himself, hit the high places 
for the nearest drink. 

5 « » 

Down in Hillsborough, where fads succeed one another with 
every new rumor from Paris, they are playing baseball. How 




Warm weathe' brings its discomforts—Sunburn and Tan---and you should know how to 
keep your complexion clear and beautiful. Magnolia Balm quickly overcomes the effects of 
wind and sun and preserves the delicate texture of the skin. 

For SUNBURN and TAN. 

Magnolia Balm stops the burning sensation, soothes the parched, 
akin and prevents redness. Overcomes Tan and Freckles and leaves 
your complexion clear and transparent. 

Easy to apply. Clean to use. 

No massaging required. 

Neither sticky nor greasy. Softens rough skin. 

Three Colors : White, Pink, Rose-Red. 

75c. for either color. All dealers or mailed by Manufacturer*. 

Send 10 cents for set of 3 Samples one of each color. 

LYON MFG. CO., I 64 South 5th St., Brooklyn. N.Y. 




July 22. 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



could the town de luxe ever think of lowering itself to such a 
common sport? But facts are greater than questions. They 
have the leather pellet bug so bad that the spiders are actually 
making merry with the golf and polo batons that in turn reigned 
so supremely. But never like baseball, which somehow seems 
to fit the American temperament; not even when that handsome 
bunch of English army officers came over to break hearts and 
ride so rakishly well. The other day the Polo Club defeated 
the Golf Club by a score of ten to five. All the belles and beaux 
of the peninsula and bay communities were on hand to cheer 
their favorite teams, and it was certainly some cheering. The 
small boy who hollers his head off and on again at a Seal vic- 
tory would have been thoroughly ashamed of his lack of voice. 
To the stranger, we would give timely warning. The young 
lady of Hillsborough who speaks in a whisper does not really 
mean it. She has simply been to a baseball match the day be- 
fore. Moreover, if you do not understand the national game and 
its slang phrases, you are bound to be lost with her. This is 
exactly what happened to Mr. Robert Reid of Nova Scotia, who 
is visiting at Burlingame with his wife, a former belle of the 
district. Now, up in Canada they overlook baseball almost 
entirely, and play lacrosse. Mr. Reid is consequently not any 
too familiar with the favorite American game ; and viewing the 
match of the golfers and poloists, he happened to be sitting 
next to Mrs. Daniel Drysdale, who was a schoolmate of his. 
wife. During the many mischances and sometimes brilliant 
plays, it was only natural that the lady should change her 
point of conversation abruptly. In one instance, at least, she 
found the Canadian, who did not care to admit his ignorance 
of what was going on, dumfoundedly at loss. 

"How long have you been married?" she had asked. And 
Reid had told her. A short silence. Then, with new interest, 
and like a flash she brought in : "And what is your average ?" 

She meant his batting average, of course, that being a com- 
mon form of question. But Reid had come by way of Reno, 
and thought he understood American philosophy. 

"Why," he replied aghast, "I expect to live with my wife al- 
ways." 

S V 5 

The other night the lights went out at the St. Francis. It was 
quite as sudden as a train entering a tunnel, or the proposal of 
the leap year woman. The white and gold room, a bedazzle- 
ment of candelabra, glittering cutglass and gleaming tableware, 
became a void of dark, haunted by whispers. The lobby 
blinked and put out an arm for the woman next to it. The clerks 
relaxed their striking, picturesque attitudes, and the congeners 
drew themselves together, particularly their lower limbs, and 
waited for something to happen. Everything came to a pause. 
Now there is a gentleman, prominent in the Southern Club, 
who for years has held in enmity a certain other well-known 
clubman of the Olympic brand. It was a girl in the first place, 
of course — it always is a girl ! — and a Southerner rarely forgets 
or forgives. As it happened, these two gentlemen were standing 
near to one another in the lobby when the lights went out, talk- 
ing to mutual friends. Both had been about to say good-night ; in 
fact, the Southerner was in a great hurry, having an engagement 
to keep, elsewhere. So, instead of waiting for the lights to come 
on, he simply grasped his friend's hand to say good-night — 
that is, he thought it was his friend. But in the darkness, the 
four men had shifted. And in the sudden blaze of lights, the 
Southerner saw that he had given his hand to his enemy, who 
was as much amazed as himself. They merely smiled and 
turned away from each other. 

S X S 

Consider this San Francisco climate. Back East they have 
been sweltering and dying by the score. Here we have been en- 
joying weather not only amiable but delightful ; weather in days 



Pears' 

There's a unique 
adaptability about 
Pears' Soap. It makes 
the child enjoy its bath 
helps the mother pre- 
serve her complexion 
and the man of the 
house finds nothing 
quite so good for sha- 
ving. 

Have you used Pears 
Soap? 

Pears' the soap for the whole family 



as intoxicating as champagne, and always, even at its worst, 
as tasteful as sherry. And yet we growl, some of us; growl 
because we growl — without reason. Isn't it awful, Mabel! And 
Mabel, if you happen to be buying her champagne, agrees with 
you, of course. But you will notice that despite all these mur- 
murings we are enjoying ourselves immensely in this California 
country, just the same. The cafes, the hotels, the theatres, are 
fairly humming with trade, and catering with a zest known 
only in San Francisco, where tipping has become a vice. The 
good roads throughout the State offer magnificent opportunity 
for motoring, and the quaint, romantic California towns tempt- 
ing excuse. The sky is always blue overhead, and the flowers 
colorful at the wayside. The birds sing day-long in the trees, 
and the stars sparkle as though pleased at it all. Why should 
they not be ! It is all as natural as the grass underfoot, as the 
sap that springs in the young grape, or the fragrance that 
breathes from the poppy. And we are perfectly happy in it, and 
know it. So, for Heaven's sake, dear Algernon, forget your 
grouch and smile with your face as well as your insides. 
V V 5 
When it comes to press agents, Nat Goodwin is undoubtedly 
the king of them all. Engaged in writing a history of his affini- 
ties, at his place in Los Angeles, and realizing that the work will 
need advertising, he has raised his mailed fist against the press 
of the country and banged it theatrically for having made so 
much of himself and his love affairs. It is too bad, he says, 
that he has not been left alone. We agree with him heartily — 
for a different reason. Had he been left alone, he would have 
been publicly forgotten long ago. But, having fallen from his 
place on the stage, he has managed to eke out a reputation by 
marrying several beauties in the public eye, who needed the 
money, or thought they did. So through days of small theatri- 
cal returns did Nat feed the press with a baiting air of reluct- 
ance and an inward satisfaction. Except that he never made 
any of them love him, he became through virtue of advertise- 
ment a national Don Juan. But none of them died for him, and 
none of them remember nim now; unless it be Edna Goodrich in 
Paris buying a gown out of the quarter million she beat him for. 
However, it is all in a life-time — and a man cannot last forever. 
In spite of his years, N^t may find some one to marry him yet. 
There are lots of widows in Los Angeles, it is said, who are no 
longer particular. And if Nat should become famous telling 



8 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 



about his other loves, he might even land one of the young poet- 
esses who make star-gazing a vocation on the San Pedro beach. 
After all, the world is made up of fancies — nothing more. But 
to fancy Nat regretting in real earnest his newspaper notoriety 
is too much for ordinary risibilities. If it had not been for his 
friends, the reporters, who are never very particular as to what 
matter they handle, he would have passed to oblivion ages ago. 
As a remnant of his acting, it is only natural that he should ex- 
press his gratitude in sneers. 

S S S 
An amusing story is going the rounds concerning a well- 
known physician here in town. Among the recent arrivals in 
the city was a family party of mother, father and two daughters, 
who made the St. Francis their temporary headquarters. 

Shortly after reaching the hotel, the father was taken seri- 
ously ill, and the resident physician was summoned in haste. 
He pronounced the patient's condition serious, but not necessar- 
ily dangerous, and advised quiet and rest for a few days. 

The two girls were heart-broken, as their plans for a stop- 
over in San Francisco had been extensive and varied, and 
robbed of their rightful escort, the enforced stay loomed black 
and uninteresting. 

The doctor, mistaking the cause of their depression, hast- 
ened to reassure them in regard to their father's malady. 

"Oh, we know father's alright," responded the younger of the 
two, "but what are we going to do while he's ill ? We can't go 
to the theatre, or the restaurants, or — anything," and she wound 
up with a dismal sigh. 

"Oh, but you can go to the theatre," responded the doctor, 
cheerily. "It's quite correct here. Besides," he added, thought- 
lessly, "no one would notice you, anyway." 
And the next day father had a new medical advisor. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



J. Spaulding & Co., carpet beaters, are the pioneer steam 

machine carpet beaters in San Francisco. They make a specialty 
of relaying carpets, and give special attention to carpet dyeing. 
The office and works are located at 353-357 Tehama street. 
Telephones Douglas 3084 and Home J 2347. Immediate re- 
sponse to 'phone calls. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

San Francisco Institute of Art (formerly the Mark Hopkins 
Institute) Affiliated with the State University 



DRAWING 
PAINTING 
DECORATIVE 
DESIGNING 




MODELING 
ILLUSTRATING 
TEACHERS- 
COURSE 



Day. Nieht and Saturday Classes. Circulars mailed on appli- 
cation to the Assistant Sec'y. S. F. Institute of Art. San Francisco 
FALL TERM OPENS AUGUST 7, 1911 



MISS MERRIMAN'S SCHOOL 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
Primary, Grammar and High School. Oakland Public School Course 
of Study followed and State text-books used. Thorough preparation 
for College. Fall term begins July 31, 1911. 

624 El Dorado Avenue, Oakland 



Drew's Coaching School 

WEST POINT, ANNAPOLIS, ARMY 

College Preparatory. Teachers' Examinations. Civil Service 

DAY EVENING 

915 Van Ness. San Francisco Franklin 4176 



IRVING INSTITUTF 1922 Franklin Street 

UWIMVJ IIU11IUIC Phone Franklin 3118 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

32d year; all departments: terms reasonable. 

Now open for pupils. MISS ELLA M. PINKHAM 



THE HAMLIN SCHOOL 

A HIGH CLASS BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

Comprising a French School for Little Children, Primary. Inter- 
mediate, High School and Post Graduate Departments, Household 
Economics. Drawing. Painting and Elocution. 

Accredited by University of California, by Leland Stanford Junior 
University and by Eastern Colleges. 

Courses in Singing-, Instrumental Music (piano, violin, organ, harp, 
flute, etc.). Theory and Composition, Harmony, Sight Reading. Musi- 
cal Dictation, Choral and Orchestral Practice, etc. 

School re-opens Monday, August 7th. 



MISS SARAH D. HAMLIN, A. M. p 



2230 Pacific Avenue, San Francisco. 



Phone West 546. 



MANZANITA HALL 

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA. 

A healthful home school for boys — thorough, efficient, growing, 
progressive. Location adjacent to Stanford University makes pos- 
sible a school life of unusual advantages and privileges. First 
Semester opens August 29. 1911. 

For catalogue and specific information, address 
W. A. SHEDD, Head Master. 



A. W. BeA 



Alice Betft 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1828 Bush Street 



Life Cla 

Day and Nieht 



Illustrating 
Sketching 
Pain tins 



Miss Harker's School PA k° F oml° 

Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year begins August 15th. 
Catalogue upon application. 



INSTITUT BERTHELOT 

Ideally situated at 34 Rue Ribera, Paris. Mme. Leon Berthelot, 
Principal. Exceptional advantages for American girls desiring to 
complete their education In France. Superior facilities for thorough 
instruction In 

LANGUAGES, ART AND MUSIC. 
Beautiful surroundings, perfect equipment. For catalogue and ref- 
erences, address School Department, Literary Digest, also 

MR. THOS. WHITTAKER, Bible House, New York City. 



The Von Meyerinck School of Music 

Will be open during the Summer for Special Teachers' Courses for the study of 

the German Lied and French Repertoire 

COMPLETE VOCAL EDUCATION. 

Sight reading, musical history, dramatic action, piano, classes In 
German, French and Italian. Specially coached accompanists. STU- 
DIO RECITALS. 818 Grove St. Phones Market 1069; S. 1069- 



BOONE'S UNIVERSITY SCHOOL 

FOR BOYS BERKELEY 

Begins its thirtieth year August 9th. Accredited 

to Universities of California and Stanford, and five 
Eastern universities. For catalogue apply 

P. R. BOONE. 2029 Duranl Avenue. Berkeley. Cal. 



MISS HEAD'S SCHOOL 
2538 Channlng Way, Berkeley, Cal. 
Boarding and day school: college preparation: accredited to college; 
24th year, August IB, 1911. 

MARY E. WILSON, M. L., Principal. 



SNELL SEMINARY 
2721 Channlng Way, Berkeley. 
Boarding and Day School for girls. Beautiful location. Outdoor 
life. Accredited to University of California, Stanford. Wellesley, 
Mills and other colleges for women. Term opens August 9th. 
MRS. EDNA SNELL POULSON, Principal. 



.STAMMFR- NO MORE Hu 



Scientific Talking will cure you. 
Hundreds have been cured under my 
Instructions, Why Not You? Write for particulars. 

M. L. HATFIELD 1462 GROVE STREET. OAKLAND. CAL. 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 

Tub targnDBiis nun ETfisMsm 

Harriet Watson Capwbll. 



The visiting N. E. A.'s settled one thing not down in the 
records of their convention which took official account of every- 
thing from adolescent souls to sex hygiene. But the women 
delegates made one glorious discovery which they could not 
put on the minutes out of deference to the mere men educators. 

That absorbing, interesting discovery concerned the San 
Francisco shops. 

The visitors discovered that we have bargains here that are 
just as enticing as those offered by the big shops in Chicago and 
New York. 

"And one can shop," ecstatically exclaimed a prominent 
Chicago delegate, "without fear of prostration from heat. Mrs. 
Young declared to the interviewers that she likes hot weather, 
but she was very glad to turn away the other cheek, instead of 
letting a heat wave deposit a blister on that one also. We left 
Chicago with the thermometer leaping along, and I for one 
didn't have enough energy to do all my shopping. I was rather 
glad, for it gave me an opportunity to prowl around your shops 
— and fancy shopping in July with serene comfort and coming 
through the process unwilted!" 

S> © © 

Frobably in no line of ready-made dresses has there been 
such marked improvement as in simple wash dresses suitable 
for house wear, country frocks and outing purposes. There was 
a time when fastidious women avoided these ready-mades as 
impossible, and perhaps they did go through the impossible 
awkward age, but to-day their growing pains are over, and the 
most inexpensive frocks show in every seam the mark of the 
clever designer and skilled worker. 

The demand for simple tub frocks is growing so tremendously 
that an impetus has been given to the art of the designer. The 
other day a shop on Grant avenue had a window full of wash- 
dresses, not one priced over $10, and many a woman who 
stepped out of her automobile stopped to do a little window 
shopping, and then went in to purchase. For we Americans are 
slowly learning from the English that the ideal summer girl is 
not a clothes-horse. Women are wearing comfortable and 
practical dresses in the country, but none the less good-looking 
because they defy the ravages of incompetent laundresses and 
dispense with first aid from skilled cleaners. The leaven is 
working, and more and more women are discovering the real 
joys of outdoor life. The giri who puts on perishable chiffons 
and dainty marquisettes and sits down on the veranda, all of 
a summer morning, to be admired, finds that there is no man 
peopling the perspective to offer his admiration. All available 
men are off walking or riding or playing tennis or golf or swim- 
ming with women dressed for those parts.. 

American women still fuss too much about frocks and fur- 
belows in the country, take their guests too seriously, entertain 
too conscientiously for them, but thev are learning fast. One 
of our girls who went over for the Coronation and knew that 
she would spend two weeks as the guest of a very great English 
peeress, took Miss Jennie Crocker into her confidence about the 
clothes to take along for such a visit. Miss Crocker has taken 
all the degrees of being a house guest at English house parties, 
and this was her advice : 

"Take a tweed walking skirt and stout shoes — at least one 
pair with hob-nails — and some pretty dinner dresses. English 
women don't sit around all afternoon to be admired. They dis- 
appear after the morning stunts until tea-time. It's heavenly 
comfortable, and it isn't a bit like the novels of English 'high 
life.' " 

So we must admit we still have a turn of the road to travel. 
But we have struck a pretty good gait, and may get there soon. 
Meanwhile the fastidious American woman can find much 
prettier ready-mades for all the demands of our country life 
than the English offer. Our girls are willing to walk in sensi- 
ble costumes, but they must be well-cut. whereas the English 
are not so particular about the dips and spurs and angles in the 
hang of the skirt. I saw a "=tur.ning-looking khaki linen — lighter 
weight than the usual khaki — the other day, and nothing could 
be more appropriate for a walking suit. It was a one-piece 
garment, of course, for the hiatus between waist and skirt has 
been effaced by these ore-pieces. The skirt was plain man- 



tailored, with a side pocket, but instead of buttoning straight 
down the front, was smartly fastened down one side, this line 
continuing down about fourteen inches of the skirt and furnish- 
ing the pocket; waist and placket both fastened with large, 
dull green buttons and button-holes. The effect was a diagonal 
line of buttons from the right side of the waist towards the left 
knee. There was then a jog in the line, and the rest of the way 
the skirt line was stitched straight down the center front. The 
belt stitched, stitched to the frock, fastened in front, not break- 
ing the continuity of the buttons. A turn-over collar of hunter's 
green and two button-holed slashes through which a tie could 
be drawn were the only accessories. 

Such a walking suit can be purchased ready made for $6. The 
material is excellent, and the cut most admirable. For those 
for whom the khaki color spells disaster to the complexion, 
a color calamity is averted by the employment of the green 
buttons and collar and tie, and the brown and green give a 
pretty woodsy effect that is very pleasing. Such a dress is 
not only pretty and serviceable, but can be used in general for 
outdoor purposes. 

A great many women find that white dresses are the most eco- 
nomical for country wear, for they defy the strong washing 
compounds used in the laundries at summer hotels, and indeed 
where are they not used? Sprigged dimities, organdies with 
their flower-garden borders, pastel shaded marquisettes, all 
faint at the first plunge, and come through faded and dejected. 
Of course, these things are lovely if one can afford to send them 
away to be dry-cleaned or hand-laundered, but for the woman 
who must audit the accounts of her wardrobe very carefully, all 
white is the most satisfactory in the long run, for while it soils 
a little more easily, it stands the wear and tear of laundry bet- 
ter than anything with color in it possibly can. 

For the same reason that a great many stock up their country 
wardrobes largely with white frocks, a great many women have 
most of their house dresses for town wear in all white. The 
wash dress for the house has reached the apotheosis of per- 
fection. There are bargain dresses this week for the house- 
keeper who does her own v/ork, priced as low as 89 cents. One 
piece affairs they are — neat, fashioned of sober ginghams, but 
truth to tell they cannot lay any more claim to beauty than the 
ubiquitous blue and white kitchen apron of indifferent cut. But 
compared to the wrapper so widely worn in the slouch ages, 
even these dresses are sermons of beauty. 

However, it p?ys dividend^ in effect as well as in wear to go 
a little higher, and from $2 up one can buy house dresses that 
are positively chic and will work as hard for a long life of use- 
fulness and beauty as could be asked of any dress. We are 
frequently chided about the difference between the woman of 
to-day and the gentlewoman of yesterday so charmingly pic- 
tured in her garden with demurely long ruffled skirts whose 
full folds show the white stockinged feet and black slippers be- 
fitting a lady. She wears a leghorn hat flapping over her side 
curls, and one rhymes her with lavender and rosemary and love- 
lies-bleeding and sweet William and tea roses; and if around 
some turn of the garden path she should come upon the garden- 
ing woman of to-day she would undoubtedly be shocked, scan- 
dalized, would set the modern garden lover down as a bold, 
masculine creature quite out of place among box borders and 
tea roses. 

But equally shocked would be the woman of to-day who is 
her own cook as well as gardener to come upon the woman of 
yesterday who performed those manifold duties more often 
than not clad in a wrapper that made her look like a checked or 
striped gingham prairie schooner. Why don't they turn on 
that picture more often for the edification of the moderns who 
can go about their business in trim, fetching, little one-piece 
frocks that never separate at the waist-line and yet are in no- 
wise related to the hideous wrapper. And the modern woman 
can buy these ready-made frocks right here in San Francisco 
for several songs of six-pence. 



The Italian-Swiss Colony's wines, although California's 

choicest product, cost no more than others. For sale every- 
where. 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 



Stofafc Liters @f fila© ISnig, tfo® &mpgir@ir ssM tite 



Tib® Ex=!Ffr©^l©imft @n& ftlb© ©sroimaftibia 

CORRECTED AND EDITED BY LEOPOLD JORDAN. 

Oyster Bay, Long Island, U. S. A., July 4, 1911. 
His Majesty the King of England. 

My dear George : Thanks for your letter giving me particu- 
lars of the whizzing success of your coronation. It is a source 
of satisfaction to learn, too, that you missed me in the throng 
of notables. Where I am not, who is ? 

You will remember when I was last in London, giving advice 
to your statesmen about Egypt and India, and all that sort of 
thing, don't yer know, I told you then that I'd be glad to help 
you make up your coronation programme. I then proffered my 
services, not only to place your military and naval forces, but 
also told you that I'd gladly take the place of the Archbishop 
of Canterbury and administer to you the Oath of Office. 

The idea struck you as original, and I lived in the hope that 
you'd have availed yourself of my services. 

Without giving me any intimation of your intentions, you 
bestowed upon Lord Skitchener the very duties to which I 
aspired. Skitchener's alright with the Oriental gangs, but, 
Lord bless you, he isn't deuce high when it comes to command- 
ing the home crowds. He lacks the unostentatious demeanor 
that is all my owb. 

I regret his Lordship's accident during the procession in the 
Abbey, when he tripped and turned over one of the pages with- 
out even saying "by your leave." At least it will make a page 
of reverses when his autobiography shall be written. 

That my presence would have added to the beauty of the 
pageant all will admit. I know that my exuberance would have 
increased the enthusiasm; I am sure my presence seated with 
you and dear Mary in the Royal buckboard would have caused 
millions of my fellow-citizens here to have taken the trip just 
to have seen me. Still, it was a blessing to my country that 
you didn't accept my offer, for had you done so, the United 
States would have been emptied into dear old London. 

My press agent is away on his summer vacation; therefore, 
you will understand why I am compelled (with blushes) to in- 
form you of my drawing powers. My enemies want to say that 
I am a curiosity; hence the millions that attend to catch every 
word that escapes me on the platform. My words are the only 
things that do escape me. The fact is, I am the solid man, and 
my people know it and profit by it. 

Now, Georgie, they can say what they like in these supposed 
democratic communities against crowning exhibitions, but, all 
the same, they bring grist to the mill — I mean to the million- 
aires. And that reminds me that since your coronation the 
dentists here have put up their prices on crowns. It's a hard 
thing to swallow, but crowns are crowns, and they come high. 

I note in the American Ladies' Fashion Digest that the latest 
hats are to be in the shape of coronets. Rather good idea. Our 
women, God bless them, do like your coronets. And why not? 
They might as well be the wives of dukes, marquises, barons 
and so on, as wives of potato kings, coal kings or peanut kings. 
What's the difference! 

I have just read that Her Grace the Duchess of Mulberry, 
formerly of Marble Slab House, Newport, and other cold storage 
American castles, has had a tilt with dear Mary, and all owing 
to Mary's wearing black stockings in conjunction with tan 
shoes. If Mary likes black stockings, or green stockings, with 
tan shoes, why shouldn't she have the unique liberty of satisfy- 
ing her own desires? But the Duchess must needs fly to the 
Marble Slab House to cool off her indignation at the Queen's 
bad taste in stocking color. Fie, naughty Duchess! It isn't so 
long ago, Georgie, that her grandmas wore useful Dutch wooden 
shoes. They were tan, and I'll bet you their stockings were 
black or red, and home-spun at that. 

But a new-made Duchess has the privilege of growing color- 
sensitive. It may be possible that the Duchess was weened on 
color prejudice ; hence her antipathy to black stockings. Now, 
I'll tell you what I'm going to do : From now on I intend wearing 
no socks unless they are red, white and blue, and I hope that 
every man and woman in the land will adopt the national colors 
for their leg trimmings, which would show a feat in walking 



the patriotic path, a legacy handed to every American. If I 
can't get them in red, white and blue, then count me as sockless 
evermore. Which reminds me of a little joke I perpetrated at 
one of the fashionable hotel palaces when last in San Francisco. 
I know, George, that you and Mary appreciate a good American 
joke, so here it is : 

Seated in the wash room, I noticed a colored gen'man vigor- 
ously polishing a customer's tan shoes, after which he fanned 
them, one of the modern devices to extract an extra tip. 

Assuming a voice of authority, I called : "I didn't know they 
allowed gambling in this hotel." 

"Nor do they, sah!" exclaimed the colored man. 

"But I say they do; and you yourself are culpable." 

"How's dat, sah?" 

"Don't you see you're playing fan-tan?" 

There was a rush from the bootblack's seats, and I'm still 
wondering why. 

Reverting to the coronation (you see, I still have it on my 
head) I would say that we are all coronators — that is, we place 
crowns (metaphorically) on those we signal out as ought to be 
crowned, and we don't forget to put the thorny wreath around 
the bald spot of those opposed to us, because we like to see 'em 
wince. It's a certainty that your great symbolical show will 
have had a startling effect upon those Americans who witnessed 
it, and (this in a whisper) as my country's democratic form of 
governing is admittedly on trial, there's no telling when the 
shout may go forth : "Hail Terrorious Theodorus, King of 
the — " Well, I may be King of Somebodies yet. Populations 
that have been rank anti-royalists have before now switched 
and acclaimed and seated a knightly personage, such as myself, 
upon a comfortably upholstered throne. Didn't they kerplunk 
the Corsican Napoleon into an imperial chair — it may have 
been a rocking chair, but just the same he got there. 

Anyhow, the thousands of my American brothers and sisters 
who attended your coronation have been well tutored, and 
should I ever be called upon to wear crown and carry scepter, 
will know just how to comport themselves in my august pres- 
ence. 

Say, George, when you and dear Mary, God bless her, go to 
India to be crowned at the Dubar, you might consider me for 
the sub-king position at Buckingham Palace. I'd do you proud. 
I'd just like to show your rebellious Asquiths and Lloyd 
Georges and those others who'd topple your House of Lords 
topsy-turvy a thing or two. I like the noble House; I revere it 
for its achievements. To say it hasn't guarded and enhanced 
the power of the great British realm is all bosh. When in the 
Red, White and Blue House, they said I lorded it over every- 
body. You see, therefore, how successful I would be should 
you elevate me to the peerage. I'd quickly show the Right 
Honorable gentlemen on the Ministerial benches, and those 
honorable obstructionists below the gangway that they couldn't 
monkey with my prerogative. 

Surely, if I can send the fear of heaven into the breasts of 
some of my hard-fisted countrymen, I can equally as well sup- 
press your ultra-radicals and save the critical situation. 

I've just heard from Frightlaw Breed, our dear ambassador, 
who tells me that John Way Hammondeggs looked fine in 
knee breeches, and acted lovely as the Special. 

California, the land of big and glorious things, has sent out to 
the world many famous men and women — poets, authors, sing- 
ers, actors and Panama-Exhibition-boosters, and now she adds 
to her list of victories a full-fledged kneed-breeched-Native- 
Son-of an Ambassador Extraordinary upon whose symmetrical 
nether limbs, encased in silk stockings, the crowned heads of 
Monarchial Europe gazed with delight. Our dear, amiable am- 
bassador also instructs me that the Duchesses and Countesses 
of Hoboken and Cincinnati parentage, were quite fetching, 
their court demeanor being all that could be desired. 

The absence of the Duchess of Mulberry was, of course, a 
sad blow to the charmed circle, but, just the same, she is 
blamed for criticising Mary's black stockings. They say very 
wisely that if she didn't like them she needn't have peeked. 

May I close, dear George, with a joke that I hope you and 
dear Mary will take in good part: 

If Her Majesty wears only black stockings, does she show 
that she is short in her stockin' trade? 

With love from us all, and good luck to you for now and 
the years to come, 

Yours most smilingly, 

Terrorious (Ex-Rex.) 



July 22. 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



ll 



HBB®I&x8JMrdl Agaik 

I met my friend Bluebeard again yesterday — one of these 
days I am going to divulge' his name to the ladies of the Cali- 
fornia Club, and then skip across the line into Mexico, where 
misunderstood litterateurs find asylum. Bluebeard was emerg- 
ing from a bird fancier's, a heavy scowl written in unmistakable 
Oriental characters across his Occidental brow. I waylaid him, 
placing my forefinger impressively on the third button of his 
waistcoat while I whispered in his ear : 

"What do you suppose the California Club is doing now?" 

"Concocting some damfool scheme for altering the universe," 
he snapped, savagely. "I don't want to hear it — I'm too busy; 
got to see a man about a dog." 

"It seriously affects you," I pleaded. 

He pulled up short, regarding me with a bellicose stare. I 
knew, of course, that it was a cowardly breach of good faith on 
my part, but I had an axe to grind with the gentler sex for cer- 
tain private reasons that morning, and many years of Benedict 
bliss have made me proficient in the manly art of self-defense. 
Moreover, I could not resist the desire to prepare him for what 
Fate — in the material reincarnation of the aforesaid California 
Club — had in store for him. 

"Fire away!" he ordered, seeing that I hesitated. 

"You doubtless recall," I began, "that the subject of your 
'Positive Qualities' recently formed the objective of a debate 
by the gentle flowers that compose our feminine senate?" 

"They didn't get 'em?" interjected Bluebeard, grimly. 

"No, but they will this time," I retorted. 

He paled visibly, I'D swear it. 

"Go on," he said at last, in a voice that fairly shook with 
suppressed emotion. 

"It appears," I proceeded, "that at a secret meeting of those 
bodies it has been finally decided that your 'qualities' are too 
'positive' — in short, I understand that they referred to you as 
primal brute ; and that the only -way of attaining your ultimate 
salvation will be by the inculcation of the gentler virtues in 
your manly bosom." 

Bluebeard's brow darkened. 

"That accounts for it, then," he mused. "I might have known 
there was something 'clubby' back of that artistic tomfoolery." 

"Back of what tomfoolery?" I asked. 

Bluebeard led me to a secluded corner. 

"You know I have a place just outside of the city where I and 
my family spend the summer months," he explained. "On ac- 
count of the children, we keep a few hens and a rooster — more 
about that rooster anon. Also, because I like bright things 
about, we recently added a peacock to our household — a dam- 
lonely bird he was, too. All last winter my wife urged me to 
get rid of that companionless fowl, but I objected, advising her 
to dispense with the hens and rooster instead. She strenuously 
negatived this, asking me if I wished to deprive the children 
of their little pleasures? Manlike, I didn't catch the hang of 
her feminine maneuvres then. 

"To make my yarn short, Easter arrived, and we began to 
have colored eggs for breakfast — green eggs, blue eggs, pink 
eggs, 'till I decided to see a doctor about it. Then it transpired 
that she had decided it was more artistic to have the shells 
colored — lent an air of reckless gaiety to the festive board, as it 
were. It seemed a harmless sort of nonsense to me, the only 
drawback to it being the enormous amount of gold paint re- 
quired to keep up the practice. However, I said nothing, as 
my wife seemed to get so much real pleasure out of the painting 
of those confounded eggs every day, and laying them out to 
dry in the morning sun. I see now where it is having a refining 
influence on me. 

"To diverge, I was very fond of that peacock I told you of 
just now. He was a remarkably fine bird, with a' beautiful 
spread of tail — but be never got along very well with our 
rooster. Well, it seems that yesterday the rooster, wandering 
about our lawns in search of his family, came suddenly and un- 
expectedly upon the many colored eggs laid out to dry for 
our breakfast, as usual. He regarded them quizzically, scratched 
his head thoughtfully, and then hunting up my peacock, slew 
the gaudy affinity in full sight of the presumably faithless 
wives. 

"I put it to you, now, as man to man, isn't this the general 
outcome of all attempts at wielding powers of Government by 
women?" Mill Dew. 



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12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 



fflft yM^mj^la^iMhm 



Turkey Suspicious 
of the Powers. 



Official Turkey, including the Sul- 
tan himself, is growing suspicious 
of the honesty of the powers in 
their opposition to further efforts to 
break down the rebellion in Albania. The Sultan has become 
little better than a tool of the radical element of the Young 
Turk party, and it was not difficult to make him believe that 
the powers' interference in the affairs of the empire, as to 
Albania, is intended to culminate in armed invasion, ostensibly 
to protect tne Albanians, but in reality to so weaken the hands 
of the Government that it would be unable to cope with Greece, 
should existing international troubles culminate in another ef- 
fort of the Grecians to retake the Island of Crete, in which 
event Macedonia would certainly, like Albania, declare her in- 
dependence. Whether the Sultan's suspicion is well-founded 
remains to be seen, but he acts like a madman when he inti- 
mates that it is none of the powers' concern what his policy is 
in Albania or in any other province of his empire. Another 
disquieting factor is that the Albanians tell the Sultan and the 
powers that they have no faith whatever in the promise of the 
Sublime Porte that he means to deal with them in a generous 
way, and they point to the fact that the Sultan has made many 
promises in the past of better treatment, and that not one of 
them was ever kept longer than the necessary time to send re- 
inforcements to accomplish their subjugation or annihilation; 
consequently, they will not surrender and give up all thought 
of independence merely on the Government's promise to treat 
them with less harshness. On the other hand, the powers, es- 
pecially Russia and Italy, regard the Sultan's reflection on their 
honesty of purpose as a good enough reason to oblige him to 
do two things without delay : first, to give guarantees to the Al- 
banians that he will permit them to be self-governing, but as a 
province, and second, to recall the ukase that includes Christ- 
ians in the army conscription act. The scheme is all the more 
hateful to Albania and Montenegro because, under the Turkish 
army regulations, Christians are not permitted to become com- 
missioned officers; consequently there will never be an oppor- 
tunity for Christian influences to give the war establishment a 
less brutal tone; otherwise Albanians and Montenegran sol- 
diers of fortune would be glad to accept commissions in the 
Turkish army, and eventually, perhaps, exert a dominating in- 
fluence. And, again, the Sultan complains that ex-Italian sol- 
diers are constantly joining the ranks of the Albanian rebels, 
and are becoming their leaders, and the mobilization of 7,000 
Montenegran soldiers on the northern frontier of Albania is a 
menace to the Turkish army in that region, because the Al- 
banians and Montenegrans are largely of one blood and one 
religious faith. Critical observers of events in Southern Europe 
are pretty generally of the opinion that Turkey's snub to the 
powers, and Bulgaria's expressed sympathy with Macedonia's 
purpose to declare her independence and the sympathy of the 
Balkan States generally with the Albanians are almost certain 
to bring on a war between Turkey and the Balkan States, in 
which Greece would be obliged to participate as a matter of 
self-interest. 



The Pan-German press continue to 
Pan-German urge the Government to take no 

Press Warlike. backward step in the Moroccan af- 

fair. The charge is now made 
openly in Germany, even by the semi-official press, that France 
and Spain ignored the Algeciras compact, but that at all times 
Germany has acted in good faith, but since France and Spain 
invaded Morocco for the acquisition of territory in violation of 
an international agreement, it becomes Germany's right and 
duty to occupy the south end of that country, including the sea- 
port and harbor of Agadir. It is to be seen, too, that the pan- 
German associations are practically of one mind that if Ger- 
man occupancy of the Agadir country is a menace to the Ameri- 
can Monroe Doctrine, it behooves the "doctrine" to either get 
out of the way or modify itself, which may be interpreted to 



mean the German sentiment is that the German colony in Bra- 
zil should be brought in touch with the Fatherland, and greatly 
reinforced by German immigration, German capital and Ger- 
man encouragement and German, imperial protection. Evi- 
dently, German sentiment is to hold on to Agadir and Southern 
Morocco for naval and military purposes, which may not be so 
far in the future as some may suppose. Anyway, the Monroe 
Doctrine is very much of a stumbling block to Germany at this 
time. 



According to Laborite John Burns, 
Of General Interest. M. P., London now has the finest 
water supply in the world. The sup- 
ply is 25,000,000 gallons of pure water a day, which is equal to 
a river thirty-three feet wide, eight feet deep and running at 
the rate of two feet per second, night and day. 

The German Navy Department announces that all old cruis- 
ers are to be replaced by battleships, which implies that war- 
ship building in Germany's shipyards is to be increased and 
expedited at a lively pace. 

The latest from Constantinople to the Albanians is that if 
they will disarm, quit using the Latin alphabet in the public 
schools, promise loyalty to the Ottoman Empire, the Govern- 
ment, the Sultan, will reduce the tax on eatables and other 
necessities, and treat them in many other respects as human 
beings, but complete disarmament must come first. 

A Russian lady of rank has completed a journey on horse- 
back from Harbin, Manchuria, to St. Petersburg, 7,500 miles. 
It took her thirteen months to cover the distance. She had no 
relay of horses, but rode the entire distance on a pony that 
came from the mountains or Siberia. 

The Emperor of Austria-Hungary is believed to be about 
ready to go to his fathers, and all Europe is wondering if his 
death will not seriously disturb the Austro-Germany rapproche- 
ment and back up the Triple Alliance. 

France has another spell of the monarchial fever, and Prince 
Victor Napoleon is making the most of what he thinks is his 
opportunity. Certain it is the masses are getting very tired of 
the way the affairs of State are being managed. There are too 
many cabinet disruptions to make the Government popular with 
the people. 

King George and the Kaiser have buried the Anglo-Germanic 
war hatchet. 

Russia expresses displeasure at what she calls a scheme of 
the United States to put China in full possession of Manchuria, 
railroads, coal mines and all else. 



Deimel linen mesh underwear, for both sexes, and for 

old and young, is the most comfortable of all undergarments, 
being soft to the skin and at the same time durable and always 
well fitting, when made to order at Dr. Deimel's store, 176 Sut- 
ter street, San Francisco. It is of proved sanitary worth, and, 
unlike most other materials, does not chill the wearer after it 
becomes moist with perspiration. It is of such a character 
that its popularity is growing daily, and whoever once wears 
the Deimel underwear becomes thereafter a permanent cus- 
tomer. In warm weather it is cool, and in cool weather it is 
warm, being remarkably adaptable to change of weather and 
climate. 



Laborer — And have they tall buildings in America, Pat? 

Pat — Tall buildings have they — faith, Mike, the last one I 
worked on we had to lay on our stomachs to let the moon pass. 
—Life. 



Comfort Found in 
Good Old Books 



By GEORGE HAMLIN FITCH 

Review Editor of the S. F. Chronicle. Illustrated. 

$1.50 net; by mail, $1.58. Send for descriptive circular. 

PAUL ELDER & CO., Publishers 

239 GRANT AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



13 




m 



ttASUKfoHftfl) 



'TO, *,*.**) U J /X*m*--i.*-i 




The Orpheum. 

A splendid bill is in evidence, and the appreciation of the 
worth of the program is amply testified by the crowded houses. 
Any evening about eight o'clock one may see a line about a 
quarter of a block long, and by tracing it to its source, you find 
that it ends at the Orpheum ticket office. "The Charles Ahearn 
Cycling Comedians" open the bill. This is easily the best 
cycling act at present on the boards, not so much from the 
standpoint of trick riding, as from the variety of machines they 
trundle on the stage for your inspection, and which they suc- 
ceed in manipulating. Then all their work is invested with 
plenty of comedy, and all in all the act is a hummer, and is too 
soon over. Willa Holt Wakefield, who follows, is styled as 
"entertainer to New York's 400." Miss Wakefield is a large 
lady with a big hat dressed with lots of ostrich plumes, and she 
sits at a grand piano and recites a few songs, to which her piano 
gives the musical accompaniment. For myself, I must confess 
that I see nothing entertaining in it. The aforementioned "400" 
must be easily satisfied if they fall for such stuff. The lady has 
a pleasing personality, and has a certain amount of magnetism, 
but her dope is mighty weak and does not in any sense measure 
up to Orpheum calibre. 

"The Three Vagrants," who are next, give musical selections 
ranging from grand opera to rag-time, all of which is executed 
on a guitar and an enlarged accordion and a sort of flute, and 
one of the trio also possesses a splendid singing voice. Their 
work is thoroughly pleasing, and they are recalled time and 
again. Their act is a little different from the ordinary run of 
musical acts, and is, on the whole, very satisfying. They are 
capital entertainers. 

Gerald Griffin, who has been seen on the Orpheum circuit in 
other sketches, this time is using a tabloid version of Towne's 





Henry Miller in "The Havoc" at the Columbia Theatre. 



William H. Thompson, the distinguished American character 
actor, who will appear in "The Wise Rabbi," this Sunday mati- 
nee at the Orpheum. 

comedy, "Other People's Money." This play was quite the 
vogue some twelve or more years ago, and somebody was clever 
enough to see the possibilities in it in condensed form for vau- 
deville purposes. It is crammed full of wit and funny situa- 
tions, and there are many real laughs interspersed throughout 
which make it swing along with much gusto and to the evident 
delight of the audience, which is always ready to laugh at the 
smallest opportunity. Griffin is good in anything he attempts, 
and his present role makes no great demand upon his known 
ability. He can do comedy quite as well as serious things, as 
he has shown us at different times that he is master of emotion 
as well as of comedy. It is a dandy act, and was well enjoyed. 

After Rosner's musical interlude, we are brought face to face 
with our old friend "Genera'" Edward Lavine, who is dubbed 
as an eccentric comedian and a handy handler of almost every- 
thing. Lavine gives us practically the same act he has shown 
us before, but it is as entertaining as ever. He carries a lot of 
scenery and effects with him, all of which play an important 
part in his act. 

A new act entitled "The Baby" is the means of exploiting 
Emma Dunn. Miss Dunn is a very capable actress in certain 
kinds of emotional roles. My attention was first directed to 
her some years ago when she was with the late Richard Mans- 
field. Her present medium allows her plenty of scope for her 
ability. It is a compact little story, full of real feeling, which 
shows effectively the lights and shades of real life. Miss Dunn 
is capably supported by John Stokes, the author, who enacts the 
role of the doctor very well. He shows himself to be as good an 
actor as author. Helen Lindroth as the nurse is clever. Clifford 
Walker, who follows, gives a mixture of recitations and music. 
He is an Englishman, but seems to possess a ready wit. The 
act is passable. He terminates it with a fair rendering of Kip- 
ling's "Gunga Din." The Lorch Family, who are the last on 
the program, consists of eleven people, to which should be 
added three ponies and a donkey. The act is very good, the 
athletic feats being away from the conventional, and the setting 
and costuming add their quota to the effectiveness of the whole. 
It is a fitting close to a splendid program. The moving pictures 
are fine. 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 



"Sapho" at the Alcazar. 

It seemed like bringing back memories of the dear old little 
stuffy Alcazar Theatre on O'Farrell street of some ten years ago 
to see Miss Roberts in the role of the tearful and sinful heroine 
of Daudet's novel. And really, Miss Roberts did not seem a 
day older. There she was in all the glory of her red wig, look- 
ing exactly the same as she did for so many weeks at the old 
theatre when she essayed the part for so long. It is gratifying 
to note the evident enthusiasm and animation which Miss Rob- 
erts displays in the play. Time seems to have dealt gently with 
her, as all the youthful and bubbling spirit seems to be present 
that was noted ten years ago. She gives the same finished per- 
formance of the role v/hich has been discussed possibly more 
.than any play which has been produced in a generation. Practi- 
cally all of the old San Francisco has seen Miss Roberts in this 
play, and those who have not should not miss it. Without 
doubt, it is one of the very best things that Miss Roberts has 
ever done, and now she brings added years of experience to 
bear, and the result is a performance which is splendidly fin- 
ished in every particular. Her by-play in the first act is simply 
fine, and Miss Roberts presents a very ravishing picture in her 
flowing draperies. It is indeed an old story to recount the many 
virtues of her performance of the part. In this role alone, Miss 
Roberts shows ability which stamps her an actress of unques- 
tioned power and authority, who knows the technique of her 
work like a master. She plays with all her old abandon and 
dash and fire and zest, and as often as I have seen the perform- 
ance, and indeed even played in it during my checkered profes- 
sional career, I was able to sit back and enjoy every moment of 
it with genuine pleasure. That "Sapho" has a popular appeal 
there is no room to doubt. Possibly I may go so far as to state 
that it is perhaps liked better by the masses than the classes, 
but the fact remains that the Alcazar is this week playing to 
capacity business. 

Theodore Bergen is doing Jean, and I was more than pleased 
with his work. He showed less of his mannerisms than in any- 
thing I have seen him in during this engagement. In his emo- 
tional scenes he very often forgets himself, particularly that 
short arm gesture with the index finger pointed accusingly be- 
comes aggravatingly monotonous and almost unnecessary. 
However, I was pleased on the whole, and am convinced, as I 
stated during the first week o± the engagement of this gentleman 
at the Alcazar, that he was an actor with a big future before 
him. He has much to learn, and I am sure that he will improve 
with time and opportunity and experience. 

Theodore Roberts is the best Uncle Cesaire that I have ever 
seen, and I have seen quite a number of them. He managed to 
extract more solid comedy from the part than any two actors 
that I have seen. His second act in particular was screamingly 
funny. I am sorry to bid adieu to this sterling actor. He is a 
credit to our stage, a man of much inherent brilliancy and with 
tremendous ability. I shall watch his future with much interest. 
Mr. Roberts will do his greatest work in the years to come, and 
they should be crowded with big things for him. 

Bennison, as Dechelette, did not have much to do, but did all 
that was asked of him in a satisfactory manner. Charles Gunn 
was very good as Flamant, and was himself again. Gunn is a 
natural actor with unusual ability, but a stock actor is not in- 
fallible, and cannot be good in every role which is assigned him. 
Wesner had the small part of Hettaima, and was very good. 
Walter Belasco did an exquisite "bit" as the janitor. It is only 
a few lines, but he was simply great in what he did. There are 
from twenty to thirty small parts, all of which are in competent 
hands. Altogether the performance was as good as any I have 
ever seen, and the settings were in keeping with the usual ex- 
cellent standard which governs at this house. Much interest is 
being manifested in the forthcoming engagement of Richard 
Bennett, reports having emanated from Los Angeles that the 
gentleman in question is an actor who is bound to make us sit 
up and take notice. Well, we are willing. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Henry Miller will begin a two-weeks' engagement in "The 
Havoc" at the Columbia Theatre next Monday night, July 24th. 
He is beginning his second season here in the Sheldon play, 
which ran all last season at the Bijou Theatre in New York. Mr. 
Miller will be supported by the original New York cast, which 
has been held intact since the play was produced, Matinees will 
be given on Wednesdays and Saturdays. 



William H. Thompson will be the headline attraction at the 
Orpheum next week. "The Wise Rabbi" will be his offering 
during his engagement here. It tells the story of Jewish expul- 
sion from Russia, and the efforts of a kindly rabbi to get the 
ear of a high official and interest him in protecting the Jews 
from a sweeping Imperial ukase. Mr. Thompson plays the part 
of the rabbi. 

Dan Burke, the Dancing Master, will appear with the Wonder 
Girls next week. Burke is one of the grand old men of the 
stage. The girls are attractive, the setting, a scene at Lak» 
Winnepesaukee, makes a fascinating picture, and the costuming 
is exquisite. 

Fay, Two Coleys and Fay will appear in a clever and amusing 

black-face act entitled "From Uncle Tom to Vaudeville." The 

four members of the company represent a stranded Uncle Tom's 

Cabin troupe, who resort to vaudeville in order to pay their 

board bill. 

* * * 

During his starring season at the Alcazar, commencing next 
Monday night, Richard Bennett will be aided by Mabel Morri- 
son, leading woman, and Belasco & Mayer's regular company. 

"Arsene Lupin," the first play to be presented by Mr. Bennett, 
has never been staged in San Francisco, but the English version 
of the French novel, from which it was adapted, is familiar to 
all local patrons of interest-gripping fiction. The play had a 
long run in New York last year, and all the scenery and proper- 
ties used in the original offering h?ve been rented and renovated 
for the Alcazar production. Its presentation is one of the most 
expensive undertakings ever undertaken by the Alcazar man- 
agement. 



CPENCERIAN 
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Spencerlan pens are sold by all the leading stationers In California. 



New Orpheum m&sstt.,**. 

Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre In America. 

Week beginning this Sunday aftemopn. Matinee every day. 

THE STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE. 
WILLIAM ir. Thompson, the Distinguished American Character 

Actor, In "The Wise Rabbi," bj r Dlotrlchs teln ; DAN BURKE 

and the WONDER CURLS; FAY. TWO COLEYS and FAY; PATSY 
DOYLE (next week only): GERALI> GRIFFIN & CO. in "Other 
People's Money;" "GENERAL" EDWARD T.AYINK: CLIFFOR] 
WALKER; NEW DAYLIGHT MOTION PICTURES. Lasl v. 
THE LORC1I FAMILY. 

Evening prices, 10c 25c, 50c, i> Box *. :iis. $1. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays)) 10c, -5e., 50c. Phones Douglas 7n; 
Home C 1670. 

Alcazar Theatre vf^i^^uw*™™ s . kk. 

Week commencing Mori das evening, July i4th, the eminent Ameri- 
can actor, RICFTARD BENNETT, aided by Mable Morrison *nd the 
Alcazar playors in 

ARSENE LUPIN, 
Adapted from the French novel similarly titled. The greatest de- 
tective play evei staged, its first time In San Francisco 
Prices — Night. 2Bc. to fl; matinee, 25c. to 50c. Matinee Saturday 
and Sunday. Seats on sale at box-office and Emporium. 



Columbia Theatre 

Gottlob. Marx & Co.. Managers. 



Corner Geary and Mason Sts. 
Phones Franklin 160. 
Home C 6783. 



Beginning Monday night. July 24th. Matinees Wednesdays and 
Saturdays. HENRY MILLER, in his latest success, 

THE HAVOC, 
By H. S. Sheldon. 
"Mr. Miller superb in a remarkable play." — New York Times. 





TRINITY SCHOOL 

Accredited to the Universities 

Studies will be resumed August 1. 1911 
846 Stanyan St.. San Francisco LEON H. ROGER. B. S.. Principal 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



IS 



The Savoy Theatre has been leased from John Cort for a term 
of five years by Charles Muehlman, who for six years was man- 
ager of the Spokane Theatre, and who has, for a long time, been 
associated with Mr. Cort in various theatrical enterprises. The 
Savoy will, as heretofore, be devoted to "combinations," and 
will be the popular-priced house of the city, seats ranging 
from one dollar downward for every show to be played. The 
attractions will be supplied by the Theatre Owners' Association, 
of which John Cort is president, and will include such standard 
productions as "The Three Twins," "Polly of the Circus," "The 
Servant in the House," "The House Next Door," "The Vir- 
ginians," "Sis Hopkins," with Rose Melville, "The Third De- 
gree," "Mutt and Jeff," and many musical comedy successes and 
plays new to the West. The Savoy will re-open the latter part 
of August, when Florence Roberts, Thurlow Bergen and Theo- 
dore Roberts will inaugurate a joint starring tour with an en- 
gagement limited to one week. It is also probable that Max 
Dill, in a new musical comedy, will occupy the boards for a 
brief season. 

* * * 

The new and beautiful Cort Theatre on Ellis street, above 
Market, is being rapidly rushed to completion, and when it is 
thrown open for the first time, Sunday evening, September 3d, 
it is promised that a playhouse that would be a credit to any 
city in the world will be displayed. The attractions to be of- 
fered are the very best to be obtained, and the opening bill will 
be "Baby Mine," the delightful comedy that ran for a whole 
year at Daly's Theatre, New York. 



THE DOMINICAN COLLEGE OPENING. 

The opening of the next term of the Dominican College at San 
Rafael will take place August 7th, and many pupils are enrolled 
for study at this excellent institution of learning conducted 
by the Sisters of St. Dominic. 

The college, located on the Coleman tract, is one of the most 
picturesque and attractive spots in the town. The tract is a 
natural park, full of scenic beauty, with woodland, hills, winding 
avenues among shady trees and the view of Mt. Tamalpais in 
the background. 

The college itself is a handsome structure, built in the Renais- 
sance style of architecture, with all the latest modern improve- 
ments and comforts for such an institution. 

The course of study is a particularly thorough one, admirably 
adapted to fitting young women for the world of polish and cul- 
ture. It includes the study of English language and literature; 
history, ancient and modern; mathematics of varied degree; 
Latin, Greek and the classics of the ancients ; many branches of 
science; rhetoric, logic and philosophy, and Christian doctrine. 

These studies are made under the supervision and instruction 
of teachers of the highest ability and accomplishments. 

Throughout, the pupils are given every help by the faculty, 
the members of which act toward them in much the manner of 
kind parents as well as educators. The college government is 
firm, yet mild, and is so conducted that in each student habits of 
self-respect and self-control are encouraged. Upon each pupil 
rests the responsibilitv of showing herself trustworthy and 
amiable in all her relations with the teachers and fellow-pupils. 



Police Inspector Emigh, of Oakland, left for Los An- 
geles Wednesday last, to return with H. J. Reehan, who is 
charged with stealing a Turkish rug worth $350 from the home 
of Bernard P. Miller at Spruce and McKinley streets. It is al- 
leged that the rug was stolen April 11th. He saw the rug while 
visiting the Miller home to make a sale. Reehan would have 
been in the hands of the police months ago had it not been for 
the reason that the complaining parties dislike the notoriety that 
always goes with cases of this kind. 



The little boy sat by the roadside idly poking the warm 

dust with his bare toes. When the big man came along the 
little boy looked up and said: "Mister, is this your park?" 
"What'U you gimme for it?" quizzed the big man. "Fourteen 
hunnerd thousand millyun dollars," replied the little boy. "Al- 
right," smiled the big man, "just take it right along with you." 
— Youngstoun Tclcrram. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



LARGEST COAST OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND WOMEN 



WHERE QUALITY COSTS LITTLE" 

""'rofimfsTs SAN FRANCISCO. 



OAKLAND <°» E' T N s GTON 




-*>■ 




Fall Suits 

and 

Overcoats 

For Men 

Much of the new Fall Mer- 
chandise In the Men's Cloth- 
ing Section is already here. 

The styles, the materials, 
and the colorings all are 
NEW, and, are wonderfully 

smart. 

VALUES, too, are BET- 
TER than we have ever of- 
fered, and the tailoring, if 
possible, has been more 
carefully watched. 

Bear in mind when you 
buy a suit with the "WOOD" 
label that you are buying 
direct from the makeis, and 
that there is but one profit 
between you and the manu- 
facturer, You therefore can 
reasonably expect from us 
the same suit for less money 
than elsewhere, and the price 
: the same, a better suit 
or overcoat than it is possi- 
ble for any other house to 
offer. 

Inspection of the new Fail 
models is invited. 
Fall Models, $15.00 to $35.00. 



The "Kareem" Hat for Fall 

This famous 

•'KAREEM" HAT. 

ir uwii, and is manufa lively for us. 

Materials are tine silk velvet, modeled on beautiful lines, finished 
with ■ >>ound with fc-rosisraln edge. 

large head sizes. Insid*- 
re finished with a id. and satin lined like a 

man's dress hat. 

They may be had In black and in colors that will go nicely with 
the new Fall Suits. 
The price of this Hat — $3.50. And it is sold exclusively here. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 



^tfCffiTX 



t^/w 




The social activities in town have slowed down to occasional 
luncheons and teas, and most of these are spur o' the moment 
affairs. Mrs. Willard Drown meets Miss Virginia Joliffe and 
Mrs. Walter Martin at the lace counter. "Come on over to the 
St. Francis for luncheon with me," she coaxes, and they part 
the coax in the middle by agreeing with alacrity. By the time 
they reach the ribbon counter they have added Mrs. Tom 
Eastland to the party. Comes along the society reporter into 
the dining room, unsheathes her fountain pen and notes that 
"Mrs. Walter Martin entertained on Monday at an exquisitely- 
appointed table, most of the guests motoring up from Burlin- 
game for the affair." 

Likewise, Mrs. Lansing Kellogg meets a friend in the book- 
shop, where even the summer fiction is too knowing to sit bolt 
upright, and the young ladies who wait upon us seem to move 
in some rarefied atmosphere, where only the heroines of edi- 
tions de luxe congregate. Nevertheless, Mrs. Kellogg's mind 
seriously turns to thoughts of bridge, and she says: "Come on 
out to the house for luncheon with me, and we'll telephone to 
Alice and Lucy, and have a game of bridge." 

Social reporter happens to ring up and is told by maid that 
Mrs. Kellogg is playing bridge. 

Therefore: "Mrs. Kellogg entertained at one of the delightful 
bridge parties that make the season in town endurable. Mid- 
summer flowers were used with artistic effect throughout the 
house, a delicious repast was served, and the fortunate prize- 
winners carried home exquisite trophies of their skill at cards." 

As a matter of unadorned truth, the social gaieties of the 
week have not registered in town. All activity of that sort has 
been confined to the fashionable suburbs. People motor up for 
a shopping jaunt, and gather around the luncheon table at some 
fashionable hotel, or come up for the theatre, but practically 
all formal entertaining in town is dependent upon the arrival 
of distinguished visitors. If important personages put into 
port, entertaining always takes a spurt. While Major and Mrs. 
Sydney Cloman were at the Palace, there were a number of 
more or less formal dinner parties in their honor, for the Go- 
mans entertained royally in London while the Major was an at- 
tache at the American Embassy. Mrs. Cloman was formerly 
Mrs. Flora Clement of Salt Lake City, and after the death of 
Clement, spent a season or two in San Francisco before going 
to Europe, where she met Major Cloman. The Clement fortune 
is in the millions, and has the romantic history of so many 
fortunes made in mines. Clement left a great many mining 
securities, and the story goes that at their par value at the time 
the widow was left in comfort, not affluence. There is a tale to 
the effect that a wise man advised Mrs. Clement to sell certain 
securities, but she looked them over, and as they were printed 
so beautifully on such artistic paper, she couldn't bear to part 
with them. And those very securities were the ones that proved 
to be something more than color symphonies, for they were the 
ones that eventually made her income expand to the circumfer- 
ence of a large fortune. 

Among those who entertained for the Clomans were the Jack 
Wilsons, George Camerons and Robert Hays Smiths. Major and 
Mrs. Cloman are now at Tahoe, where they will spend a few 
weeks before leaving for the Major's new station in Michigan. 
Mrs. Cloman is very fond of travel, and at a dinner party last 
week told a good story on herself. Several years ago in New 
York she chanced to meet a woman friend who likewise had in- 
dependent means. 

"Let's spend the season in Paris," suggested the then Mrs. 
Clement. 

"No, Flo., I've set my heart on going to Dalmatia. You come 
with me." 

"Dalmatia!" exclaimed Mrs. Clement, "how interesting!" 

She agreed to go, and spent the next day arranging her af- 
fairs. In the evening she rang up her friend and asked : "Oh, 
where is Dalmatia, anyway? Is it hot or cold, and what kind 
of clothes will one need?" 

"I really hadn't up till that moment given it a thought," she 



PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street in the center of the city. 
Take any Market Street Car from the Ferry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The most beautifully situated of any City Hotel 

in the world. 

Take the Sacramento Street Cars from the Ferry 

Two Great Hotels Under the Management of the 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



confessed. "I just liked the sound of the word 'Dalmatia,' 
and for all I knew, it might as well have been at the North Pole 
as north of Turkey." 

© © © 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Spreckels, Jr., have gone on a yachting 
trip with the John D. Spreckels and the Adolph Spreckels. 
Young Mrs. Jack is liked by all the warring Spreckels clans, 
because she has such a merry, sunny disposition. Nevertheless, 
she is credited with the following bon mot. Some intimates 
were discussing the rifts in the family lute, and agreed that 
it was distinctly un-Teutonic, as the bond between German kin 
is usually an unbreakable cable. "Well," Mrs. Jack is quoted 
as saying, "you see the Spreckels family went so deeply into 
sugar that it turned to starch in their dispositions, and makes 
them stiff towards each other!" 

© © © 

Noel Sullivan, who has been studying music in Paris, is now 
in London, but will sail for home at the end of the month. If 
he were not an heir to the Phelan fortune through his mother, 
this young man would probably engage in a musical career, as 
his talents are of a high order. While in England he spent much 
time with old family friends, particularly the Reginald Brookes. 

It will be remembered that his sister took the Carmelite veil, 
and in order to have her near, Mrs. Sullivan bought Mrs. Robert 
Louis Stevenson's home, and the Carmelites were established 
in San Francisco. There is talk of abandoning the Stevenson 
home, and a question of whether the Order will remain here. 
Apropos of society and prominent girls who have entered con- 
vents, it will be news to many that Miss Theresa Thompson, 
who entered an English order, left after finishing her novitiate, 
and is now a guest of her uncle, Admiral Thomas, in Maine. 
She will spend the winter with her sister, Mrs. Norris, in New 
York. 

© © © 

Miss Natalie Hunt, who is to marry Mr. Herbert Baker, was 
the motif for a pretty little tea at the Town and Country Club on 
Monday afternoon, at which Mrs. John Burke Murphy presided 
as hostess. Town and Country is a very pretty setting for such 
affairs, and garlanded with girls as it was, the other day, filled 
with delight the eye of one who chanced to wander into that par- 
ticular room. Miss Hunt, like the majority of society girls of 



BLACK 

AND 

WHITE 

SCOTCH WHISKEY 



The Quality Scotch Which Enjoys the 
Greatest Popularity 

ALEX D. SHAW & CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents 

214 Front Street, San Francisco" 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



this generation, is an expert needle-woman, and many of the 
most exquisite hand-made things in her trousseau were fash- 
ioned by her own clever fingers. 

g> © © 

The beautiful new home of the Robert Oxnards at Menlo is 
rapidly nearing completion, and they plan to be comfortably 
settled in the house by the end of August, although the hardest 
piece of work is yet to be done — the finding of an appropriate 
name for the estate. A great many of the travelers are home- 
ward bound, and there is a great bustle among caretakers. Mrs. 
Will Crocker and her daughter are expected in a few weeks at 
New Place. The Francis Carolans are leisurely making their 
way towards California. Miss Jennie Crocker will motor 
through France with the Templeton Crockers before coming 
home, but they all plan to be here when the curtain is rung up 
on the winter season. 

Mrs. Walter Hobart is one of the few Californians who has 
no immediate home-going plans. Apropos of the Hobarts, the 
fact that the estate in Western Nevada has been leased to a 
syndicate which includes Jack Casserly, has robbed Walter 
Hobart of the distinction of being the owner of the fabled riches 
that have stirred the imagination of every one who ever heard 
the story of the lost mine said to have been so successfully 
covered up by the prospector who was refused a lease. Hobart 
has been joshed a great deal by his intimates, who nevertheless 
have frequently made tentative offers to go in search of the 
missing treasure. Hobart, along with the land, inherited the ap- 
parently well-founded tradition of the lost lead, and if this syn- 
dicate unearths the treasure, another California romance will be 
added to the history of mining. 

© © © 

The fact that the September golf tournament at Del Monte is 
to be a world competition has lent energy to many a good right 
arm that was developing apathetic golfitis. Spurred by a desire 
to at least stay in until somewhere near the finals, if not in the 
finals, many of the fair golfers are doing overtime work, and it 
is expected that there will be some new material to reckon with. 
For instance, any one focusing the glasses over the brown hills 
of Blingum will frequently see a glorious wash of burnt orange 
color against the brown of the landscape. It is the sweater of 
Mrs. Oscar Cooper, who is swinging her golf sticks most indus- 
triously. 

© © © 

Mr. and Mrs. H. H. McGowan gave a birthday banquet at 
Paraiso Hot Springs in honor of their guest, Professor James M. 
Madden, of Santa Clara College. Visitors from Oakland, San 
Francisco and other coast places were at the table. The Pro- 
fessor responded to the different toasts in his honor. The even- 
ing was most enjoyable. 

Mrs. A. J. Ahem, Miss J. Ahern and Mr. John F. Ahem, of 
San Francisco, are at Paraiso Hot Springs for a month. 

The Countess Pinarello, of Florence, Italy, has returned to 
Paraiso Hot Springs for a brief stay. Lieutenant Henry F. 
Burgess, of the Marines, and party, will entertain at the Rose- 
wood Cottage this coming month. 

© © © 

The G. A. Newhalls have engaged a suite of apartments at 
Del Monte, and are planning to go down sometime during the 
week. Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Foucar drove down to Del Monte in 
their car Saturday, this making their second visit in two weeks. 
Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Campbell, who are touring the coast, are 
making a stay of several days at Del Monte. Mr. Campbell is 
Western representative of the New York World. 

Miss Hilda Clough, of San Francisco, motored up from the 
South with Miss K. M. Cocke of Los Angeles. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. V. Laveaga, Miss Juanita de Laveaga, M. A. 
de Laveaga, motored down to Del Monte last week. 



PRESIDIO HEIGHTS 

DYEING and CLEANING WORKS 

3828 to 3836 CALIFORNIA STREET 

High Art Cleaners 

HENRY HICKMAN. Proprietor Phone Pacific 1612 



Brigadier-General Daniel H. Brush, commander of the De- 
partment of California, and Mrs. Brush, have taken up their 
residence at the Hotel Jefferson. With Mrs. Brush are her sis- 
ter, Mrs. A. R. Bullock, widow of the late Lieutenant Bullock, 
of the Seventh Cavalry, aiso Mrs. Col. Deems, wife of Col. 
Clarence Deems, of the Coast Artillery, and her two children. 
Mrs. Deems is the daughter of General and Mrs. Brush. Accom- 
panying the General are the following officers and their fami- 
lies: Lieutenant W. S. Fulton, Aide-de-Camp ; Major James H. 
Frier, Inspector-General ; Col. Wm. W. Gray, Colonel Medical 
Corps. 



"WITH BUT A SINGLE NAME." 

Four candy stores with but e single name "Geo, Haas A Sons!" All 
of them in San Francisco: Phelan Building: Fillmore at F.llis: Van Ness 
at Sutter; and 2S Market street, near the ferry. 



ST. FRANCIS 



UNION 



SQUARE 



ELECTRIC GRILL 

A restful atmosphere for ladies and 
gentlemen who wish it. No music. 
An artistic setting: for the best 
service that we can give. : : : 
Geary Street entrance. 

Under the management of James Woods 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Sts., San Francisco, California. 
High order hotel. Fine air, elevation, location. Five minutes 
from San Francisco's lively center. Well liked by ladies. 

American Plan $3.00 and up per day 

European Plan $1.50 and up per day 

THOS. H. SHEDDEN. Manager. 



ORIENTAL RUGS 



GENUINE BARGAINS 

We are offering our finest and rarest 
specimens in genuine Persian weaves 
at such substantial reductions that an 
inspection will prove this to be the 
greatest value giving sale in high grade 
Rugs ever known. 

Anyone failing to look over our stock 
and prices will make a grave mistake. 



MIHRAN & CO 

ESTABLISHED 1878 

The Oldest and Reliable Rug House 
326 SUTTER STREET 



Your stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY 
Let us guide you in your selections 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importer* of and Dealers in 
THE HIGHEST CLASS P^PER FOR OFF1CE STATIONERY 
Battery and Ja ckson Sta. San Francisco, Cal 

Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty lltUe booklet or exquisitely perfumed powdered leaves to 
carry In the purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 
prove the complexion. Sent for 10 cents In stamps or coin. P. T. Hop 
kins. 37 Great Jones SL. N. T. 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 



§@ddl smadl IP«@nii<5iS Hftdnaas 



Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear In the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 

WEDDINGS. 

BRYAN-ROBERTS. — The wedding of Miss Dorothy Bryan and John Grif- 
fith Roberts will take place at the Palace Hotel on August Oth. 

CAMPBELL-EECKLEY, — The wedding of Miss Beatrix- Campbell and 
George C. Beckley will take place at St. Mary's Cathedral on August 
first. 

CHAPAIAN-FOSS. — The wedding of Miss Dorothy Chapman and Benja- 
min Foss will take place at Grace Cathedral on August 29th. 

CORURN-SIPLEY. — The wedding of Miss Etma M. Sipley and Ueutenant 
Henry C. Coburn took place on Tuesday at the First Presbyterian 
Church. 

SIMPSON-HOUGH. — The wedding of Miss Amalia Simpson and William 
Hough will take place Wednesday. September 6th, in St. Luke's Epis- 
copal Church. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 
ELKINS-DE Gt'IGNE. — The engagement is announced of .Miss Marie 

Louise E'kins. of Philadelphia, and Christian de Guigne of Paris and 

San Mateo. No date has been set for the wedding. 
PIERCE-HAGEN. — The engagement is announced of Miss Mildred Pierce, 

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Pierce, of Santa Clara, and George 

Penn Hagen. of Manila. The wedding will take place within two 

months. 

LUNCHEONS. 

BREEDEN. — Mrs. Henry Clarence Breedcn was hostess at a. luncheon at 

the Francesca Club recently, the guest of honor being Mrs. John Gill. 
HOOKER. — Mrs. Osgood Hooker was hostess at an informal lunch 

cently. 
MILLER. — Miss Marian Miller will entertain a number of the bt-lles at a 

luncheon and bridge party next Tu< 
MOORE. — Mrs. C. B. T. Moore entertained at a luncheon at her home on 

Yerba Buena Island on Wednesday in compliment to Mrs. Henry L. 

Mayo. 
RATHBONE. — Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Rathbone were hosts at an Informal 

luncheon on Monday. 

TEAS. 

BAYNE. — Mrs. Richard Bayne was hostess at an informal tea recently, 

the guest of honor being Mrs. Horace Hill of New York. 
FARNHAM. — Mrs. Sylvanus Farnham entertained at an informal tea at 

the Palace, recently. 
KINGSTON. — Miss Marguerite Kingston entertained at a tea at the 

Palace recently in honor of Mrs. Theodore Murphy. 
MURPHY. — Mrs. John Burke Murphy was hostess at a tea at the Town 

and Country Club on Tuesday in honor of Miss Natalie Hunt, the 

fiancee of Herbert Baker. 
NEUSTADTER. — Mrs. D. Neustadter entertained a number of friends at 

tea at the St. Francis on Tuesday. 
SULLIVAN. — Miss Helen Sullivan was hostess at a pretty tea at her home 

in Pacific avenue on Monday, prior to her departure for Southern 

California. 
WATERMAN. — Douglas Waterman was host at a tea at the Palace on 

Tuesday, In honor of his fiancee. Miss MolUe I >utton. 

DINNERS. 

CHAPPALAER. — Captain and Mrs. Louis Chappalaer entertained at a 
dinner at the Presidio recently. 

HENNESSY. — Mr. and Mrs. William J. Hennessy were hosts at a dinner 
recently in honor of Mrs. R. Works and Miss Louise Works of St. 
Paul. 

MARSTON. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Mars ton entertained a number ol 
friends at the SL Francis on Wednesday evening in honor of Presi- 
dent Jeffery of the Western Pacific R. R. 

PIXLEY. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pixley entertained at a dinner at the 
Hotel Victoria recently in honor of General ami Mrs. Tasker H. Eliss 
and Miss Bliss. 

ROWAN. — Mrs. Andrew Rowan was hostess at a dinner recently, at which 
Edward Van Cieve was the guest of honor. 

TROTTER.— Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Trotter entertained at an informal 
dinner recently at their home on Angel Island in honor of Mrs. Trot- 
ter's sister. Miss Mabel Barling. 

WISSER. — Colonel and Mrs. John P. Wlsser were hosts at a dinner in 
honor of Colonel and Mrs. Frederick van Schrad<-r on Friday night. 

THEATRE PARTIES. 
BLAIR. — Mrs. Samuel Blair gave a theatre party recently for several of 
the younger set. 

HOUSE PARTIES. 

SESNON. — Mr. and Mrs. William Sesnon entertained a large house party 
over the week-end at their country home at Capitola. 

CARDS. 
LUKENS. — Mrs. Russell J. Lukens entertained at an informal bridge 

party at her home in Broadway recently, which was followed by a tea. 
TENNY.— Mrs. W. T. Tenny and Miss Wilhelmina Tenny, ot Honolulu, 

were guests of honor at a bridge party i n by .Mis. Pruett, 

MOTORING. 

ALEXANDER. — Miss Harriet Alexander motored recently to Del Monte 

with friends. 
DE LA MONTANYA.— Mr. and Mrs. Jack de la Montanya havi left for a 

leisurely automobile tour of the Northern part of the Stat--, and will 

be away several weeks. 



GRIFFEN. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Griffen and their daughter will leave 

shortly for a motor tour of Southern California. 
MONIEAGLE. — Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. Monteagle have returned to their 

home in Pacific avenue, after a delightful motor trip in the southern 

part of the State. 
OXXARD. — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Oxnard have returned from an automo- 
bile tour through the McCloud River country. 
VAN SICKLEN. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick van Sicklen and Miss Dorothy 

van Sicklen have been enjoying a motor trip in Lake County. 
ARRIVALS. 
AMES. — Mrs. Frank Ames and Miss Helen Gray have returned from a 

trip to Lake Tahoe. 
AI.LYXE. — Mrs. John W. Allyne, Miss Lucy and Miss Edith Allyne re- 
turned recently to New York, after six months' absence abroad. 
BAKER. — Miss 1'uiothy Baker has returned from Castle Crag, where she 

has been the guest of Mrs. Wakefield Baker. 
BALDWIN.— Mrs. Lloyd Baldwin has returned from a visit to the Collier 

home at Clear Lake. 
BEXTLEY. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Bentley have returned to the city 

after an absence of two months in the East. 
BRESSE. — Mr. Eugene Bresse has returned from a month's visit to Yo- 

semlte. 
CARRIGAN. — Jack Carrigan has arrived from the Philippines, and will 

be here for a visit of several weeks. 
CI1ESEBROUGH. — Miss Helen Chesebrough has returned from a visit to 

Portland, where she was the guest of friends. 
1»EAX.— Miss Ethel Dean has returned from the Orient, and is now the 

guest of her sister, Mrs. Flora Dean Magee at the latter's ranch in 

Nevada, 

iHOE. — Miss {Catherine Donohoe, who has been the guest of Mrs. 

Charles Brigham and Miss Kate Brigham at Tahoe, has returned to 

her home at Menlo Park. 
FARNHAM. — Mr. and Mrs. Sylvanus Farnham and Miss Elsie Clifford have 

returned from Santa Cruz. 
F< 'STER.— Mrs. W. A. Foster, Miss Martha Foster, Miss Louisiana Foster 

and Arthur Foster, have returned from Cleveland, and are established 

at their home in San Rafael. 
GRANT.— Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Grant and children have returned from their 

ranch near San Jose, and are at their home in Burlingame. 
GEISSLER. — Mrs. Arthur Geisslcr and children arrived on Monday from 

Chicago, and will spend the summer with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 

George Moore at Ross. 
GREGG. — Miss Ethel Gregg has returned from Cloverdale, where she was 

visiting friends. 
HAMILTON. — Mrs. Charles Hamilton arrived recently from Fort Leaven- 
worth, and is the guest of friends for several weeks. 
HAMMON. — Mrs. Wendell P. Hammon, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. 

Scott Hendricks, have returned to town after a trip through the 

Santa Cruz Mountains. 
HARRISON. — Mrs. Crystal Harrison has returned from Savannah, Ga., 

where she was the guest of her son. Lieutenant Harrison. 
HEILBRON. — Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Heitbron have returned from Santa 

Barbara, where they spent several months. 
HOWARD. — Mrs. Emma Shatter Howard has returned to her home on 

Pacific avenue, after enjoying a visit in Marin County. 
JEXXIXGS. — Mrs. Hennen Jennings, with her daughter, Miss Katherine 

Jennings, and son, Coleman Jennings, have returned from Lake Tahoe, 

and are guests at the John C. Coleman home in California street. 
KEENEY. — Mrs. Charles M. Keeney and Miss Innes Keeney have returned 

from Sonoma County, where they have been the guests of Judge and 

Mrs. F. Z. Blakeman. 
KING. — Mr. and Mrs. Homer S. King and the Misses Genevieve and Hazel 

King are home after being abroad for the past year. 
KNIGHT. — Mrs. Samuel Knight has returned to her home In Hillsboro, 

after a visit in Del Monte. 
KRAXTHOFF.— Major ana Mrs. Charles Kranthoff have arrived from 

Manila, and are being cordially greeted by their friends. 
'L.YWSON. — John Lawson returned on Wednesday from England. 
LIVERMOUE.— Miss Edith Livermore has returned from a visit to Yo- 

semito. where she spent a month. 
LENT.— Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Lent have returned to town after an outing 

in the northern part of the State. 
MA1LLIARD. — Ernest Mailllard and Raymond Ashton arc home again 

after a hunting trip in Marin County. 
■MASTEN. — Mrs. Joseph Manuel Masten, Miss Eugenie Masten and Miss 

Kathryn Masten have returned from Del Monte, and are at their home 

in Washington street, 
MATTHEIS. — Mr. and Mrs. Jack Mattheis have returned from Los An- 
geles, and are established at their home in Ashbury Heights. 
MERILLION. — Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Merillion have returned from the south, 

and are at present with friends in Marin County. 
METCALFE.— Miss Edith Metcalfe has returned from a delightful visit at 

Santa Cruz. 
MONTEAGLE, -Paige an/1 Kenneth Monteagle returned recently from 

the E 
MURPHY.— Dr. Murphy and Mrs. Murphy, of Chicago, with their throe 

daughters are guests at the St. Francis. 
O'KAXE. — Mrs. W. D. O'Kane has returned from an outing at Santa Cruz 

and is at her apartments at the Keystone. 
OLIVER. — Mrs. B. P. Oliver and Miss Nora Oliver have returned from 

Yosemitc, and are spending the remainder of the summer in San Mateo. 
POTTER.— Mr. and Mrs. Milo Potter and Miss Nina Jones have returned 

from Virginia Hot Springs, and are spending a few days in the city 

before returning to their home in Santa Barbara. 
REID. — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Reid, of Nova Scotia, are visiting in San 

Francisco, and are being cordially entertained by their friends here 

and in Burlingame. 
REGEXSUUitGER.— Dr. A. E. Regensburger has returned to his home 

in this city, after a tour of the Northwest. 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



EVBL.T.- -Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., have returned from 
Sonoma County, where they have been visiting friends, 
BCHAfiTiTCR. \i< . Walter SchaUer, who hav< broad for 

three years, hai or ind .,, recetvln 

Ing from their friends. 
SHERMAN— Mr. and Mrs. Roger Sherman have arrived from ■ 

i . and are the guests of their daughter, Mrs Pri i 
STRICKLAND.— Mrs. Augustine Strickland is visiting I ■ he East, 

and is the guest of Mr 1 ?. William Dennian and Miss Jennie Hooker 
sims. Mr. and Mrs. Cokor Sims have returned from La Honda, and are 

at their apartments in the Bella Vista, 

'■NT.— Mrs. Frederick w. Tallant lias returned to her home in Bu- 
nan street after an outing ;ii Tahoe. 
THOMPSON. — Mrs. Joseph Sefton Thompson has arrived from Santa 

Barbara, and will spend the summer with her sister, Miss Mary Buf- 

fington at Mill Valley. 
"WtiBSTER. — Mr. and Mr?. Walter Byron Webster have returned from 

Yellowstone Park and the Grand Canyon of the Colorado. 

DEPARTURES. 

AVERT. — Mrs. Caroline Colt Avery left recently for the East to join her 

sister, Mrs. Wilfred Ransome, in Boston. 
KAU 'WIN. — Mrs. Lloyd Baldwin, Sr., and her daughter, Mrs. Russell 

Selfridge, have left for Yosemite, and will be away a month. 
CAMPBELL. — Mrs. Henry C. Campbell will leave shortly for abroad. 

Where she will join her daughter, Mrs. Henry R. Rideout. 
I'AMl'GELL. — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Campbell left on Monday for their 

home in Chicago, after a visit of several weeks in Palo Alto. 
CLARK.— Charles W. Clark, accompanied by a party of intimate friends. 

left recently for Salt Lake City, to be gone several weeks. 
DXJTTON. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton, accompanied by Mrs. 

Worthington Ames, will sail August 2d for Honolulu. 
DEAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dean and Miss Helen Dean have left for 

Lake Tahoe, where they will spend a month. 
EELIS. — Lieutenant and Mrs. Ward Ellis left recently for the East. 
FENNIMORE. — Arthur Fennimore left for the East recently to meet Mr. 

and Mrs. W. D. Fennimore on their arrival in New York from Europe. 
GRRENEBAUM. — Mrs. Leon Greenebaum will leave shortly for Portland, 

where she will join her husband on a motor tour of the Rockies. 
HERRMANN. — Mr. and Mrs. William Herrmann and Miss Erna Herrmann 

will leave shortly for Yellowstone Fark, and will be gone several 

weeks. 
HILT-.— Mr. and Mrs. Horace Hill left recently for a trip to Lake Tahoe, 

where they will remain for about a month. 
JoLLIFFE.— Miss Virginia Jolliffe left recently for Santa Barbara, and 

will be the guest of Mrs. Willard Drown at Miramar for several weeks. 
LALLY. — Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Lally have joined Mr. and Mrs. Henry 

Lund, Jr., at Del Monte. 
LANE. — Mrs. J. R. Lane and Miss OtiHa Lane left Wednesday fur Lake 

Tahoe, where they will spend the remainder of the month. 
LANGE. — Mr and Mrs. William E. Lange have gone to Portland on a 

visit. 

MAUU. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Maud sailed recently for Europe, and 

are going direct to London. 
MAVME. — Dr. and Mrs. W. II. Muynir have gone to MontecltO, where 

they will be entertained by friends. 
MCCORMICK.— Mrs. E. O. McCormlck and Miss Louise McCormtcfa left 

recently for Paso Robles. 
McNUTT.— Mrs. W. F. McNutt lefl recently for Aspen. Colorado, where 

she will spend the coming six months as the guest oJ Mrs David R. C. 

Brown, 
MOODY.— Mr. and Mrs. Fred M i have gone to u where 

they will stay fqr the remalnde 

MUSTO. Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Muato tiavi gone to Bartlett Springs 

for the summer. 
NEWHALL, Mi. and Mrs. George a. Newhall have left for Del Monte for 

;i. \ [ell Hi si v< raJ days 

McGREW. — Tarn MeCi.w left on Tuesdaj fol Honolulu, where he will 

Visit his parents, Dr. and Mrs, McGrew. 
0TT1 HER M ps. Ellen Oysl one to Sai I ■ and will pass 

i in tin South with her sister. Mrs, Fred Hamilton. 

i i i i EtS ■! P to Monterey for a brief visit. 

PAINTE3 i and Miss Prances Ramsay have left for 

i take Tahoe to visit M sell. 

SO >TT. Mr. and Mrs, Henry T. Scott left recently for Paso I 

wh 'iv thej wlU re i aln for about two weeks. 
STOTT Mr. and £r* Frederick Vandeventex Stott have left for Santa 

lara to spend ;i month with Robin Hayne, 
sessions.-- Mrs D R - nd her daughter have left for a two 

u eeks' visit to 1 1 ■ 

SIMONS, Mi ml J Simons. With Mrs I Miss 

M. t.» their country home In St. Helena fo* the sum- 
■ ■ 
TETVX& Mrs. William S. Tevls, Miss Lily O'Connor and 

lied recently from New y/ork for 1" 
ri'MAM — Commander P. V. Qpham, r. s, x. and Mrs. Uphan 

r Of the world. 

VOLKMAN, Mr and Mi unpanied by their i 

| na Volkman, and Miss Bdlth Treanor, b 

inth, 
V< >N SCHR< "i ;i •! , ■ . -1, r and her daughter. Miss 

Janet VOn - and her son. Henry von Sehroeder. b&1 

m San Luis Obispo, where they will spend the 
mer. 
WILLIAMS, Mi« Florence Williams left recently for Yosemlte, where 

she will S] ks. 

been visiting here for the past few 
. left last Saturday for the East and Europe. 



INTIMATIONS. 

UTON.— Mrs. G 

1 
\ VKNALI. Ah. and Mi- i m 

will si i onu 

Mrs. Charli -- ■!< ii ■ 1 1 .M 
HALDWtN, The Misses Mildred md Laura Baldwin art al tfui 

present with their aunt, Mrs. .). B. Wright. 
:ISHOP.— Mrs. James Hall Bishop and her children are at the I 

ranch near Santa Barbara, an.) will remain there until September. 
R LAIR. —Mies Jennie Ble ■■ panted by her brother, \\ 

making a midsummer visit at Bartlett springs. 
BLISS.— Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bliss will spend the greater part m 

at Lake Tahoe. 
BRAT.— Mrs. Augustus Rr:i> and Miss Bray are the guests of Mrs. Coon 

and Miss Dorothy Coon at Menlo. 
BREMER.— Mr. and Mrs. Milton Bremer are enjoying a visit at Lake 

Tahoe. 
BRUSH.— Brigadier-General Daniel H. Brush and Mrs. Brush are estab- 
lished at the Hotel Jefferson permanently. 
BUCK. — Major and Mrs. Carroll Buck have been entertaining Mrs. Buck, 

Sr. t and Miss Florence Buck of Minneapolis. 
BULL. — Mrs. Henry Bull and Miss Margaret Bull are being entertained 03 

friends in England at present, but plan to return early in the fall, 
CATES. — Miss Lucille Cates, of St. Louis, is a guest at the home of Dr. 

and Mrs. William A. Hardaway. 
CROCKER. — Miss Jennie Crocker and Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Crocker are 

expected to return to their home in Hillsborough early next month. 
CROCKER. — Mr. and Mrs. Templeton Crocker are still in London, but 

will leave shortly for Switzerland. 
CUSHING.— Mrs. Sydney B. dishing, who has been the guest of Mrs. 

Samuel Knight at Burlingame, has returned to her home in San 

Rafael. 
DAVIS. — Mrs. Richard William Davis, who has been abroad for several 

months, is now in England. 
DE LAVEAGA. — Mr. and Mrs. J. Vincent de Laveaga, accompanied by 

Miss Juanita de Laveaga and M. de Laveaga, are at Del Monte. 
DICKSON. — Miss Irene Dickson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Brown, of 

Honolulu, is at the Hotel Stewart, where she is visiting friends. 
DEVEREAUX. — Mrs. William Devereaux is visiting Mrs. James King 

Steele in Mendocino. 
DILLINGHAM. — Mrs. Harold Dillingham, of Honolulu, will arrive here in 

September to visit her mother, Mrs. Hyde-Smith. 
DRISCOLL. — Mrs. J. M. Driscoll and Miss Mary Verdon were the week- 
end guests of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Driscoll in their new home at the 

foothills of Hillsborough. 
DROWN. — Mrs. Willard Drown has taken a cottage at Miramar, where she 

entertained several of her friends. 
FINNEGAN. — Miss Kathleen Finnegan is planning a trip to Europe in the 

fall. 
FOSTER. — Arthur Foster will return from the East shortly, after a stay 

of several weeks. 
GRANARD. — Lady Granard (Miss Beatrice Mills) will come from England 

shortly, and will visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ogden Mills at New- 
port 
GALLOIS. — Mr. and Mrs Eugene Gallois and Miss Jeanne Gallois are 

enjoying a tour of Canada, and are at present at Banff. 
HANCOCK. — Allen Haneoek and Hancock Banning are at Bartlett Springs 

for a brief stay. 
HANNA. — Mrs. J. Selby M:inn;i has returned to her h >mi in Hh' ''ily after 

a visit with Mrs. Silas Palmer in San Mateo. 

In Charles Harlow and Mrs. Harlow have taken i i se 

in Vallejo for the suim 
HAYNE.— Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Hayne and their daughter are spending 

the summer in Switzerland. 
1 1 1 :m .man. — Mr. a in! Mr-. AJfred Setlman have closed their home in 

Paris for the summer, and will spend the coming months on a motor 

tour of the British Isles, 
MEWLi-n'T.— Dr. Walter Albion Hewlett and Mrs. Hewlett at 

of M \V. P. Reddington on Seott street. 

I IS.— Mr. and Mrs. Boward Holmes have reached New York from 

Europe, where they spenl B month in travel, 
HEWITT.— Mr. and Mrs. DlxweU Hewitt were guests over the week-end 

of Mr. and Mrs, Joseph Sadoc robin in Burling 
JONES. — Herbert Jones U spending the summer at Mill Valley, wi 

has been enter Mining informally. 
KellL — Mr. and Mrs. Frederiek Kohl will remain at the Fairmont the 

greater part of the sun 
LEWIS.— Mrs, Lev. Miss Mabel de Noon, of Paris, are 

visiting Lake Tahoe. and expert to remain In California & 

months longer. 
LANQHOKNEt. — Miss Julia I^nghorne will return on Tuesday from Santa 

Barbara, w I hail, 

MAGEE. — Mr. and Mrs. Walter Magee and thm re "• eupylng 

their cottage at Tahoe. where they will remain until the hist of 

August. 
M. MILLAX. — Mrs. Robert Me M Ulan has gone to Menlo f->r a visit with 

Mrs. Silas Palmer. 
.MKTCALFK— Miss Edith Metealfe is spending a 

as the guest of friends. 
MILLER. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Miller and Chaun -n the 

sta of Richard Tobm at his home in El Cerrito. San Mateo. 
MORGAN. — Reverend Edward Morgan has g->ne to Paris after i leisurely 

trip through Italy. 
UcNBAB. — Mrs. G^-tu.- McNeai and □ route 

home after a year's tour of the world. 

(Continued to page 23.) 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 



SAN FRANCISCO LIFE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

HOME OFFICE: 57 POST STREET, 7th Floor 
San Francisco 

JOHN A. KOSTER. President 

THE BEST POLICIES ON EARTH TO SELL 

THE BEST MEN WANTED TO SELL THEM 

THE BEST CONTRACTS TO THE BEST MEN 

SEE OUR LIST OP STOCKHOLDERS 

Address the Company 
CATHCART MACGURN. Jjsl. General Manager anil Director of Agencies 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, 9 1,800,000 



Assets, $8, 150,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 
San Francisco, California. 



Cash Capital, $400,000 



Cash Assets. $1,117,480.03 



Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Employers' Liability. General Liability, Teams, Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile. Burglary, Plate Glass, Personal Accident 
insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant Borel & Co., Treasurer; F. P. Deering, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man, W. E. Dean. F. P. Deering, E. F. Green, James K. Moffltt, J. W. 
Phillips, Henry Rosenfeld. Adolph A. Son. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 416 Montgomery SL, 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000 

Surplus to Policyholders 3,060,063 

Total Assets 7,478.441 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING, 
Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 





British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 


Ltd. 




OF LIVERPOOL. 


..$6,700,000 




BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 




350 


California Street. Sa 


n Franclico 



The WesT: Coaft Life Insurance Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well-managed institution; organized under the rigid insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Geo. E. Billings Roy C. Ward James K. Polk 



J. C. Meussdorffer James W. Dean 



Geo. E. Billings Co. 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED 
312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 2283 

Home Phone C 2899 




INSVRAM 




The stockholders of the Sacramento Holding Company, 
which promoted the Western National Fire Insurance Company, 
are after the scalps of C. G. Benson, F. H. Sturgis and W. A. 
Steele. A meeting has been called for July 29th, for this pur- 
pose. These three worthies have been at outs, not only with 
the directors of the fire insurance company, but with those of 
the holding company appointed by themselves and by those 
whose aid they expected to secure a perpetual contract to oper- 
ate the fire insurance concern on terms to be named by them- 
selves. This contract has been submitted to the directors of the 
fire insurance company, but five of them have refused to sign 
it. Under this contract, Benson was to get 35 per cent of the 
premiums for a period of 49 years, and was made out to Benson, 
his heirs or assignees. It perpetuated the promoter in office at 
a salary that would have increased each year as the business 
prospered. 

The five directors in opposition anticipated such a contract 
when they held their first meeting, and immediately upon elect- 
ing officers adjourned without transacting other business. No 
regular meeting of the directors has been held since. Benson 
wants his contract signed up by giving him absolute power in 
the insurance company. The insurance directors refuse to act, 
and Benson, by virtue of his control of the holding company, 
which is still in control, has clogged the wheels of progress. 

To raise $300,000, the investors had to pay the promoters 
$200,000, and hence will not get the promotion cost back. The 
two propositions to save the company, one plan being to levy 
an assessment of forty cents a share to provide a working sur- 
plus, and the other to merge with the Vulcan Fire, now organiz- 
ing at Oakland, are both considered impracticable. 

As the holding company numbers its investors by the hun- 
dreds a great growl went up when some of the inside workings 
of the company were bared, with the result that several attor- 
neys have been examining the books to ascertain the standing 

of their clients. 

* * * 

At a meeting of the directors of the Pacific Surety Company, 
July 10th, it was by a two-thirds' vote decided to at once dis- 
continue the writing of employers' liability and surety business. 
The paid-up capital stock of three hundred and fifty-six thou- 
sand dollars was reduced to three hundred thousand, and the 
balance applied to surplus. The charter of the company will 
be amended, making three hundred thousand the capital instead 
of one million to meet the Illinois law, which requires the capi- 
tal of a casualty company to be fully paid. The three hundred 
thousand will also enable the company to write its five casualty 
lines. The prime motive for the discontinuance of the surety 
and employers' liability branches is alleged to be the unprofit- 
able results experienced during the past two years. At the same 
meeting, the resignation of E. Myron Wolf, vice-president, was 
accepted, and Walter A. Chowen elected as a director. Chowen 
will also be vice-president and have full charge of the under- 
writing. Wolf will return to the practice of law. 

• • • 

The immediate effect of the recently enacted employers' lia- 
bility law has been almost chaotic upon local conditions in this 
business. The law goes into effect in September, and it is 
charged that some agencies, foreseeing a raise of rates at that 
time, are now accepting business at any rate obtainable in order 
to get the business upon their books. The new rates which the 
more conservative companies feel called upon to adopt as the 
result of the new law have already been agreed upon, and will 
be in the hands of their agents this week, and strictly adhered 
to. 



Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company of California 

Insure Against LOSS OF INCOME, EARNING POWER, OR SALARY 

F. A. STEARNS, Manager Accident Department 
SHREVE BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



Premiums of California companies for the six months ending 
June 30th are one hundred and seventeen thousand six hundred 
and fifty-three, as against one hundred and twenty-nine thou- 
sand six hundred and eighteen for the same period last year. 
Returns from foreign companies and companies of other States 
are incomplete, but show a falling off except with the Home of 
New York and Liverpool & London & Globe, which make large 
gains. 

» * * 

The California Insurance Company had a remarkably good 
experience during the first half of the present year. The net 
premiums written were $369,899; net incurred losses $141,- 
194; $30,000 was added to the re-insurance reserve in the face 
of a reduced income. The trade profit (surplus and reserve), 
amounted to $78,433; underwriting profit ratio, 13.08; trade 
profit ratio, 21.31. 

* * * 

Representatives from the Frankfort, Aetna Indemnity, Em- 
ployers' Liability, Pacific Coast Casualty and Pacific Surety 
Companies, forming a committee to suggest casualty rates for 
California in conformity with the provisions of the Rosebury 
Act, passed by the last Legislature, will be prepared to make 
recommendations to the Eastern bureau by the last of the pres- 
ent week. 

* * * 

General Agent Faull, who has persistently held aloof from 
the local Burglary Underwriters' Association, to-day received 
a peremptory wire from General Secretary F. S. Garrison, of the 
New Amsterdam Casualty to join, which he did. 

Only surety lines will be dropped by the Pacific Surety Com- 
pany of San Francisco, the company continuing the writing of 
employers' liability, accident and health, plate glass, general 
liability, burglary and team and vehicle. 

The Empire Life Insurance Company has appointed Walsh, 
Simmons & Van Dusen, incorporated for the purpose, general 
agents for Western Washington of its health and accident de- 
partment. Headquarters will be at Seattle. 

C. R. Harold has resigned as special agent of the Niagara 
and London, after several years' service, in order to enter the 
Seattle insurance firm of Calhoun, Denny & Ewing. President 
Harold Herrick, of the Niagara, is visiting the Pacific Coast De- 
partment managers, Thornton & Parrish. 

Edward B. Flemming, formerly special agent for the Shawnee 
Fire, has been engaged by Chapman & Nauman to do field work 
for the American Union. 

There is a strong movement among members of the San Fran- 
cisco Brokers' Association to take the control of that organi- 
zation from the Pacific Board. 

The City of New York and the Northern Insurance Company 
of New York, the Bertheau-Watson Company general agents, 
have been licensed by the California Insurance Department. 

The Empire, of Seattle, has made application for a Califor- 
nia License, and appointed Harvey L. Sheppard, of Los An- 
geles, State agent. 

Following the resignation of Vice-President and Director of 
Agencies Charles A. Bradley, of the Golden State Life of Los 
Angeles, O. K. Evans, assistant secretary and actuary, has sev- 
ered his connection with the company. It is understood that he 
will become assistant agent of the California National Life of 
San Diego, J. K. Tennant's company. 

D. C. Henderson, a prominent citizen of Colusa, Cal., has 
been arrested for burning his store for the insurance. William 
Barnes, an alleged accomplice, has confessed. 

Additional hose and a new hose cart will be purchased by 
Sonoma City, and a uniform pressure in the mains be main- 
tained of at least 80 pounds in order that a promised reduction 
in rates may be secured. 

C. J. Elsasser, of Pomona. Cal., is being held on a charge of 
having set fire to his tea store to obtain the insurance money. 

At Portland. Or., Engine Company No. 16 is now in service 
at 98 Montgomery street. Extra first size Metropolitan engine, 
hose wagon, with 2,000 feet of 2VJ inch hose, and 300 feet of 
one-inch hose, nine men, and five horses. 

At Berkeley there has been installed a Seagrave 80-h. p. auto- 
mobile combination chemical and hose wagon, carrying 1,000 
feet of 2% in. hose, ISO feet of l 1 ^ in. hose, 200 feet of 1 in. 
chemical hose, one 40 gallon chemical tank, two 3-gal. extin- 
guishers, one 25 ft. ladder and one 12 ft. ladder. In service in 
Shattuck avenue, near Vine street, five men constitute the force. 




LIQUEUR 



PERES CHARTREUX 



—GREEN AND YELLOW— 

The original and genuine Chartreuse has always been and 
still Is made by the Carthusian Monks (Peres Chartreux), who, 
since their expulsion from France, have been located at Tarra- 
gona, Spain; and, although the old labels and insignia originated 
by the Monks have been adjudged by the Federal Courts of this 
country to be still the exclusive property of the Monks, their 
world renowned product is nowadays known as ' ' Liqueur Peres 
Chartreux." 



At first-class Wine Merchants, Grocers. Hotels. Cafes. 

BMJer & Co., 46 Broadway. New York, N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 



STATEMENT 

Of the Conditions and Affairs of the PENNSYLVANIA CASUALTY COM- 
PANY, of Scranton, In the State of Pennsylvania, on the 31st day of 
December, A. D. 1910, and for the year ending on that day. 
Published pursuant to the Provisions oF Section 611 of the Political Code, 
and compiled from the annual statement filed with the Insurance 
Commissioner of the State of California. 
CAPITAL. 

Amount of Capital Stock paid up in cash $200,000.00 

ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by company $ 84,808.45 

Loans on mortgages 5,005.00 

Cash market value of all stocks and bonds owned by company.. 349,369.20 
Amount of loans secured by pledge of bonds, stocks and other 

marketable securities as collateral 15,238.20 

Cash in company's office 1,206.55 

Cash in banKS 51,930.71 

Interest due and accrued 3,207.23 

Agents' Balances representing business written subsequent to 

October 1. 1910 140.391.43 

Total assets $651,156.77 

LIABILITIES. 

Losses in process of adjustment or in suspense $ 16,799.00 

Expenses of adjustment of losses 1,000.00 

Gross premiums on risks running one year or less. $438,393.29; 

re-insurance 50 per cent 219,196.65 

Gross premiums on risks running more than one year, $38,404.00; 

re-insurance pro rata 14.853.92 

Special reserve for unpaid liability losses 122,736.66 

Taxes due or accrued 7.000.00 

Commissions and brokerage due or to become due 40,636.56 

All other liabilities 3,161.06 

Total liabilities $425,383.85 

INCOME. 

Net cash actually received for premiums $676,430.65 

Received for interest on bond and mortgages 183.47 

Received from interest and dividends on bonds, stocks, loans and 

from all other sources 16,510.63 

Received for rents 2.893.42 

Gross profit on same or maturity of ! ■ tfl 1,053.25 

Policy fees required or represented by applications 9.584.00 

Income from all other sources 203.34 

Total income $706,858.76 

EXPENDITURES. 

Net amount paid for losses $260,563.36 

Expenses of adjustment and settlement of claims 51,261.74 

Dividends to stockholders 8.000.00 

Paid or allowed for commission or brokerage 193.777.84 

Paid for salaries, fees and other charges for officers, clerks, etc. 73.860.71 

Paid for State. National and local taxes 16.997.51 

Gross loss on sale or maturity of ledger assets 607.50 

Policy fees retained by agents 

All other expenditures 46,784.09 

Total expenditures $666,436.74 

M. G NICHOLS. Vice-President 

OAR Secretary. 
E P. KI v .Treasurer. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 15th day of February. 1911. 
FRANK R. STOCKER. Notary Public. 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 




LA PRINCESSE LOINTAINE. 

Over the waters and far away 

There is a land that the sailors know, 

Where the tall, white lilies forever sway, 
And the crimson roses forever blow; 

And the seamen, pushing their ships from the strand, 

In song have called it the Far-away Land. 

Only the destined prince can reach 

The land and city of Far-away, 
Run his ship on the golden beach, 

And wed the princess, and rule alway. 
And waiting his coming the portals stand 
Welcoming-wide in the Far-away Land. 

The roses sleep on the dreaming walls, 
The fountains nod in the hyacinth beds, 

The warm wind sighs through the silent halls 

Where the courtiers are bowing their sleepy heads 

With her cheek at rest on her slender hand 

The princess waits in the Far-away Land. 

Ship after ship with its swelling sail 

Slips away with the wind and the tide. 

Daring with eager prow the gale 
On nameless water afar to ride. 

With sails full set and tiller in hand 

Each of us seeks for his Far-away Land. 

But some stop off at the Fortunate Isles 

And eat of the lotus, and so forgets, 
And only remember their quest at whiles 

When the heart is sick, and the cheeks grow wet. 
For the flash of an instant they understand 
And weep for the love of their Far-away Land. 

You who follow her sweet lips' call 

Over the waters and over the sea, 
Though the days of your life like the leaves may fall 

While you wander and 'ong for the love to be — 
Fairer than you, even, understand, 
She is waiting for you, in the Far-away Land. 

— Walter Perry Doig in Harper's. 



THE VISION. 

You are the vision, you are the image of the dream, 
The voice among the stars, the silence in the stream ; 
A breath of the infinite poise, where space and time are spun 
And the circling orbits wheel their planets round the sun. 
Beyond the outer margin where nothing calls to God 
Leaps the fiery symbol to bloom where your feet have trod ; 
Here is the earth resurgent with color and bloom of spring, 
Glorying the dream and the vision in the song you bring. 

— William Stanley Braithivaite in Cosmopolitan. 



FALL POSTER SHOW. 
Great interest prevails in the local art community in the coming fail 
fashion poster competition. Artists all over the city and elsewhere in 
California are preparing their best work for the occasion. The designs. 
which must be suggestive bf fall fashions, must be submitted not later 
than August 4th to care of James Woods, St Francis Hotel. The posters 
submitted will be on exhibition in the Tapestry Room of the St. Francis. 
August 5th, and the award of ?100 for the best poster will be made there, 
by a jury composed of three well-known artists of this city n-.t [nt< ited 
in the competition. 



TWO NEW ONES. 



Schwabacher-Frey 
Stationery Co. 

will remove to their new home 

541-543 MARKET STREET 

Opposite Sansome 
ON OR ABOUT JULY 24 



5% per month 

SAVED on the investment by 

buying the 

ALASKA REFRIGERATOR 

900,000 SOLD SINCE 1878 

We have a Test Refrigerator to prove what we 
claim for it. Please call and see it. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 



557-563 Market Street 



San Francisco 



If the 

S T E I NWA Y 

Has a 
Reputation 
the Piano 
Merits it 

Sherman Bay & Go. 

Sleioway and Other Pianos Player Pianos of all Grades 

Victor Talking Machines 

Sheet Music and Musical Merchandise 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Sts., Oakland 



Milk Chocolates and Mel'o Cream Chocolates. They have proved revela- 
tions to lovers of truly delicious chocolate creams. Geo. Haas & S-ins' four 
candy stores; Flielan Building; Fillmore at Ellis; Van Ness at Suiter; and 
28 Market street, near the ferry. 



DAKE'S PRESS CLIPPING BUREAU 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

432 S. Main Street 
Phone F 1289; Main 4133 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

12 Geary Street 

Phone Kearny 1440 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



§®ckll m& IP®irs®mdl M,®m§ 



(Continued from Page 19.) 

NKWI iai.i, Mr. and Mrs. George Aimer Newhall and their two Bona are 

at the Hotel Peninsula in San Mateo for a few days. 

NICHOLS. — Bishop and Airs. William Ford Nichols and Miss Peggy 
Nichols are still in London. 

O'SULLTVAN.— Mlsa Ellen O'SulUvan Is at present in Bath, but will re- 
turn to London shortly. 

OTIS.— Miss Cora and Miss Frederieka. Oils have been enjoying a viBlt at 
Inverness as the guests of Miss Isabel Beaver. 

PAYNE. — Mrs. Theodore Payne and her sons, who have been abroad for 
several months, are expected home shortly. 

PETERS. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kollo Peters will spend the next -two 
months on a yacht at Belvedere. 

PHELAN. — Miss Mollie Phelan is entertaining several Eastern friends at 
the Potter in Santa Barbara, 

POPE. — George A. Pope, who has spent the last few weeks in Seattle, is 
expected to return to his home in Hillsborough shortly. 

POWERS. — Miss Ruth Powers is the guest of her aunt, Mrs. Ellen Coles- 
worthy, where she will remain for the rest of the season. 

PORTER. — Mrs. W. S. Porter will remain at Santa Barbara for a fort- 
night before returning to this city. 

PRESTON. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Preston are guests of Mrs. E. F. Preston 
at Portola Hall, Woodside, for several weeks. 

PROCTOR. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Proctor are at present in Paris, where 
they plan to remain until September. 

RIDEOUT. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Rideout are enjoying a visit in France. 

RfTTEN HOUSE. — Dr. and Mrs. Johnson Rittenhouse and Miss Muriel Rit- 
tenhouse, of New "Sork, are enjoying a tour of California, and at pres- 
ent are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Dudley Allerton Parker at San 
Mateo. 

ROSS. — Judge and Mrs. Erskine Mayo Ross, who have been abroad for 
sevei*al months, are coming home this month, and sail for New York 
to-day. 

SCHMIEDELL. — Mr. and Mrs. Edward Schmieden have opened their villa 
at Lake Tahoe, where they will remain until September. 

STEWART. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stewart were the week-end guests of 
the Misses Marion and Gertrude Mills at their summer home at No- 
vato. 

THOMAS. — Mrs. Chauncey Thomas has gone to Napa Springs, while 
Admiral Thomas is engaged in his duties at Mare Island. 

WILSHIRE. — Mrs. William Wilshire and Miss Doris Wilshire have returned 
to town from Mill Valley. 

WORDEN. — Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Worden are at Lake Tahoe for several 
weeks. 

WEIHE. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Weihe are visiting at the Tyson ranch in 
Sonoma County. 

WHITNEY. — Mr. and Mrs. Parker Whitney and Mr. and Mrs. Vincent 
Whitney are at Del Monte. 

WUEST. — Miss Leonora Wuest is the guest of Miss Crockett at Vallejo. 

ZEILE. — Miss Ruth Zeile is visiting Miss Helen Keeney at Shasta Springs. 



The death of Colonel W. R. Smedberg, last Wednesday, 

at his home in San Rafael, removes a noted figure from the local 
business, social and military worlds, and his loss is much 
mourned by numerous friends. Colonel Smedberg was highly 
esteemed by all who knew him. He was a veteran of the Civil 
War, in which he rendered gallant and distinguished services. 
He was recorder of the local commandery of the Military Or- 
der of the Loyal Legion for many years; was senior member of 
the insurance firm of Smedberg & Smedberg, in the Merchants' 
Exchange Building, and a leading member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. He was born in New York, March 19, 1839, 
and came to San Francisco in 1865, going into business here 
after his retirement in 1870. Colonel Smedberg belonged to the 
Union League, Army and Navy and Pacific Union Clubs. He 
is survived by his wife, formerly Miss Fannie Raymond, two 
sons, one in the army and one in the navy, and two daughters. 
The funeral took place Friday, with military honors. 



There are rules to be observed even in expressing one- 
self concerning the effects of the weather upon one's anatomy. 
A young Frenchwoman, who was learning English while on 
tour with an American governess, once inadvertently exclaimed, 
"Oh, my, I am all of a sweat!" "Mademoiselle," exclaimed the 
governess suavely, "never let me hear you use that word again. 
Horses sweat, men perspire. Ladies only glow." — London 
Chronicle. 



"Have you any ancestors, Mrs. Kelly?" asked Mrs. 

O'Brien. "And phwat's ancistors?" "Why, people you shprung 
from." "Listen to me, Mrs. O'Brien," said Mrs. Kelly impres- 
sively. "Oi come from the rale shtock av Donahues that 
shprang from nobody. They shpring at thim." — Catholic Tri- 
bune. 



Dr. Lyon's 

PERFECT 

Tooth Powder 

not only cleanses, preserves and 
beautifies the teeth without injury, but im- 
parts purity and fragrance to the breath, 
removing instantly the odor of tobacco. 



If Charles Simpson Abbott will com- 
municate with the undersigned he will 
hear of something to his advantage. 



WILSON BELL 



INGOLDBY, Solicitors, Louth. England 
6th June 1911 



Phone Franklin 6322 Home Phone C 2663 




ELECTRICIANS 




MOTOR EXPERTS 


Wiring 


Supplies Installations Repairs 




DOUAT & FENTON 


136 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



INVERNESS 

The most beautiful Summer 
Outing Home In America, 
where sea and pine meet, two 
hours from San Francisco, thro* 1 
| tall redwoods of Marlff. Delight- 
fully wooded villa lots overlooking 
Tomales Bay, only $200; $20 down, 1 
\ $7.50 monthly, no Interest. Go , 
\ with us to see this property. 
\ Call or write for catalogue. 

G.M.Wooster Go 

303 Phelan Bldg. 



Murphy Grant & Company 

■Wholesale Dry Goods Furnishing Goods 

Notions 'White Goods Laces 

N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets. San Francisco. 

Blake, Moffitt & Towne 

PAPER. 

14O0 to 1480 Fourth St.. San Francisco. Telephone Market 3014 
Private ELxchanjre Connecting all Departments 



A TREAT THAT CANT BE BEAT 

Gilt Edge Whiskeys 

RYE or BOURBON 

For sale at all first-class Groceries. Saloons and Cafes 

WICHMAN, LUTGEN & CO., Inc. 

SOLE PROPRIETORS 
43 1-439 Clay and 428-434 Commercial St., San Francisco 



SOLID CAKE— NO WASTE 

SAPOLIO 

Cleans When Others Fail 
And Requires Less Effort 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 




New York 
Financial Outlook. 



The reports from the crop centers 
have been much more satisfactory 
during the past few days, and the 
favorable conditions have finally 
been effective in causing the resumption in the rise of stocks. 
The initiative in the upward movement was given by the sharp 
rise in the Interboro securities, and was materially helped by 
the covering of short contracts and the fact that little stock was 
held by the public. The improved conditions are still main- 
tained with n) disturbing news, and the market has held re- 
markably well, and we look for the continuancy of an active 
market and believe that for speculative purposes stocks are a 
purchase even at the present advanced quotations, and although 
subject to slight reactions should work to a much higher level, 
pending the complete assurance of good crops, however, profits 
should not be ignored. 

Conditions in the steel and copper business show continued 
betterments, and shares of these companies should be conserva- 
tive purchases. 

The cotton crop is unquestionably a bumper one, and we look 
to see cotton sell considerably lower. We advise for the pres- 
ent, caution in selling of cereals, owing to conflicting reports 
from the grain centers. — By F. Thieriot, Resident Partner 
Ehrich & Company, 409 Pine St., San Francisco. 



According to the report made this 
Bank Assets week by the State Superintendent of 

Increasing. Banks, the total assets of the bank- 

ing institutions of California now 
exceed $1,000,000,000, surpassing all precedents. This rapid 
development of the financial power of the State is unparalleled. 
This figure is an increase of more than $72,000,000 during the 
last year. Deposits have reached $697,000,000, with surplus 
and profits at $75,000,000. A comparison of the figures of to- 
day with those of a year ago discloses a gain of $35,000,000 in 
deposits and an increase of $42,000,000 in the loan item. Cash 
in bank has decreased $640,000. This is occasioned by the 
growth of loans and bond investments. The summary issued 
by the Bank Superintendent includes both State and national 
banks, 705 in all. The principal items are set forth in the 
following table made from the reports of June 7, 1911 : 

502 State Banks 203 National Banks 

Aggregate assets $608,858,170 $433,582,491 

Loans and discounts 379,064,484 266,301,290 

Bonds, etc 115,436,308 79,239,100 

Cash in bank 21,738,168 31,127,020 

Capital 58,663,348 51,803,750 

Surplus and profits 38.054,943 37,253,289 

Individual deposits 481,195,256 216,747,109 

The totals and a comparison with the figures of a year ago 
follow : 

Increase 1911 
over 1910. 
$72,504,646 
42,965,344 
14,447,995 
*640,123 
8,379,635 
2,231,034 
35,062,639 



705 Total Banks 

Aggregate assets $1,042,440,661 

Loans and discounts 605,365,774 

Bonds, etc 194,675,408 

Cash in bank 52,865,188 

Capital 110,467,098 

Surplus and profits 75,308,232 

Deposits 697,942,365 

* Decrease. 



Short term bonds to the amount of 
California Oil Fields. $500,000 have been sold in San 

Francisco by the Lakeview Oil Co., 
which developed the wonderful gusher of that name in the Mid- 
way field. The flotation was made through I. W. Hellman, Jr., 
and Sutro & Co. It is understood that almost the entire amount 
has been placed. The balance is to be offered at a price said to 



be in the neighborhood of 89*4. The securities carry 6 per 
cent. 

There is another big Lake View gusher on the famous Lake 
View Oil Company's property, fractional section 25, 12-23, near 
Maricopa. The well for two hours flowed at the tremendous 
rate of about 800 barreis an hour. The well sanded up, and the 
time has since been spent in running the baler with the expec- 
tancy of getting the well opened again this week. Huge gate 
valves have been put in place, much sump and tank storage has 
been provided, and every precaution is being taken against a 
repetition of the famous gusher! 

The oil companies working south of Wartham Creek, south 
of Coalinga, are arousing much interest. The Canadian-Coa- 
linga Oil Company (Ltd.), operating on section 8, 21-15, well 
No. 1, is more than 2,000 feet deep. The formation for the last 
150 has been blue shale. The Coalinga Hub Oil Company well, 
section 22, 21-15, is more than 4,000 feet deep. A shot was 
placed in the hard strata of sand, and the well is showing a little 
light oil. 

The Blair Oil Company, section 14, 21-15, has the water shut 
off at 2960 feet. The 6y 2 -inch casing is now 3,000 feet deep. 
The manager expects the pay sand within the next 100 feet. 



Quick Telegraph 
Service. 



The growth of the use of the wire- 
less telegraph service is becoming 
more marked every day. Its use is 
by no means confined to oversea 
messages, but may be applied, and is applied, widely to mes- 
sages between shore stations. The Federal Telegraph Com- 
pany, which is established in the Merchants' Exchange Build- 
ing in this city, is giving excellent service between San Fran- 
cisco and Stockton, Sacramento, Los Angeles and San Diego, 
at very low rates, 15 words to Sacramento, for example, costing 
but 25 cents, and to San Diego or Los Angeles but 40 cents. 
This company offers peculiarly good facilities to financial and 
commercial houses. Its day letter rate is 50 words for one and 
one-half rates, and night letters, 50 words for one regular rate. 
The increasing demand for the Federal Company's service is 
causing it to spread its territory. It expects soon to be operating 
in Chicago and all towns on this side of that place. 



What California has to-day in mer- 
California Timeer. chantable timber, and what areas 

of the State exist which are capable 
of forests are shown by a forest map compiled and just issued 
by State Forester G. M. Homans. The map is a picture of 
natural wealth which the following figures, supplied by Mr. 



EHRICH & COMPANY 

409 PINE STREET 

Members New York Stock Exchange 

Foreign Correspondents 

Securities Bought and Sold on Commission 

STOCKS, BONDS, COTTON AND GRAIN 

Private Wire Chicago — New York 

FERDINAND THIERIOT, Resident Partner 

Telephones: Sutter 2170 Home C 6630 San Francisco 



BONDS 


Established 1858 


STITRO A, CO Investment Brokers 


412 Montgomery Street San Francisco 


Members Slock and Bond Exchange Circular oo request 



BISHOP & ELY 

680 Security Building Los Angeles, Cal 



SCIENTIFIC TREE 
SURGERY 



Expert Tree Work by Trained Men 
CALIFORNIA OAKS A SPECIALTY 



Branch Office 



San Mateo, Cal 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



Homans, tell in another way: "There are approximately 100 
million acres within the State," he says, "and upwards of 16 
million acres produce or could be made to produce merchant- 
able timber. Nearly one-third of the State is in some degree 
forested. The standing timber measures more than 381 billion 
board feet, and has a market value of 700 million dollars." A 
copy of the map will be mailed to any one writing to Mr. 
Homans at Sacramento. 



BANKING 



With the incorporation last Tuesday 
Bond House Organized, of the Smith-Tevis-Hanford Com- 
pany, the plans of the United Prop- 
erties Company to organize a bond house took definite form. 
The name of the new organization is derived from the names 
of the three men most heavily interested in the United Prop- 
erties Company, and its capitalization is $1,000,000. In the 
articles of incorporation it is specifically stated that the business 
of the new house will be confined to the handling of securities 
of the parent and subsidiary organizations. The offices will 
be under the management of Roy Ryone, recently connected 
with J. H. Adams & Co. 



Rich Country 
to be Tapped. 



A rich country will be tapped by the 
Colusa-Hamilton Railroad, a South- 
ern Pacific property, articles of in- 
corporation of which were filed this 
week in this citv. The capital stock is $2,000,000, divided into 
20,000 shares, of which $61,000 has been paid in. The road, 
which will be of standard gauge, will run from the line of the 
Southern Pacific Company at or near Harrington, Colusa 
County, through Colusa to Hamilton, Glenn County, a distance 
of 61 miles. This region is largely devoted to sugar beet culti- 
vation. The directors of the new road are Horace G. Jenkins, 
William Hood, W. R. Scott, C. H. Redington and E. F. Calvin. 



J. W. Frank, who has been concerned in some oil enter- 
prises in this State, is going to be sued by State Mineralogist 
L. E. Aubury as a result of a cablegram episode, in which, it 
is alleged. Frank distorted a statement made by Aubury, mak- 
ing it appear that the latter had made a favorable report upon 
some oil property, whereas, as a matter of fact, he had made no 
report at all, or even inspected the property. Frank is himself 
suing the Consolidated Oil Company for commissions alleged 
to be due him for sales of stock, and has attached a rotary 
drilling outfit belonging to the company. The plant of this 
company is already under an attachment levied by workingmen 
who are suing for their wages. 



After the report had been current for a week that Jim's 

wife, whom Jim had met and married and was still secluded in 
Chicago, was ugly as sin, a friend who had Jim's interests at 
heart ran down the author of the rumor with the intention of 
making her retract. "How do you know she is ugly?" he asked. 
"Have you seen her?" "No," said the experienced gossip, "I 
never have; neither have I seen her picture, nor anybody who 
has seen either her or her picture, but I know she is ugly be- 
cause I had it straight from a person who lives in Chicago that 
when she ordered a dozen pictures taken just a while before 
the wedding the photographer made her pay in advance, and 
a photographer never does that unless the subject is so ugly 
that she is apt to be discouraged when she sees the pictures 
and refuses to pay for them on the ground that he hasn't done 
good work. If you don't believe me, ask any photographer." 
But Jim's companion let the matter drop. — Neiv York Times. 



Private Wire -New York. Chicuo 



Wnltrn Union Cod, 



J. C. WILSON 



New York Slock Eiehani, 

Chicago Board of Trade 

The Slock and Bond Etchanie. S. F. 



Main Office 

MILLS BUILDING 

San Francisco 

Correspondents 

HARRIS. WINTHROP & CO. 

New York. Chicaeo. London and Paris 



Branch Offices 

PALACE HOTEL 

(Main Corridor) San Francisco 

HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 

Lot Antelei. Gil. 



Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 



'Vipital, Surplus and Undivided Profits $11060 796 92 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10170*490 90 

Total Resources , .. 43,774 '997 - 72 



I. W. Hellman, Jr. 

F. L. Lipman 

James K. Wilson . 
Frank B. King .. 



Isaiaa W. Hellman 
U. de Guigne 
Leon Sloss 
Percy T. Morgan 
F. W. Van Sicklen 
Hartland Law 

Customers of this 
dent banking. New 



Isafas W. Hellman, President. 

..Vice-President W. McGavin Assistant Cashier 

.Vice-President E. L. Jacobs Assistant Cashier 

.Vice-President V. H. Rossettl .. .Assistant Cashier 

Cashier C. L. Davis Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 



I. W. Hellman, Jr. 
William Sproule 
Wm. Haas 
Wm. F. Herrin 
John C. Klrkpatrlck 



James L. Flood 
Henry Rosenfeld 
J. Henry Meyer 
Charles J. Deerlng 
James K. Wilson 
F. L. Lipman 
bank are offered every facility consistent with pru- 
accounts are Invited. SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO 
SIR EDMUND WALKER C. V. O, 



ALEXANDER LAIRD 



LL.D.. D.C.L. 
President 
General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 

Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 8,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are is- 
sued in denominations of 

$10, $20, $50, $100, and $200 

and the exact amount payable In Austria, Belgium, Denmark. France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated on the face of each cheque, while in other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Mionger 

450 California Street corner Leidesdorff 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings (The German Bank) Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

reserve and Contingent Funds 1,605,792.68 

Employees' Pension Fund 113,473.47 

Deposits June 30, 1911 44,567,705.83 

Total Assets : 47,173,498.51 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post Office, or Express Co.'s Money 
Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours — 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock m., and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock p. m. 
for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS — President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; 
Second Vice-President and Manager, George Tourny; Third Vice-Presi- 
dent, J. W. Van Bergen; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, 
William Herrmann; Secretary, A. H. Muller; Assistant Secretaries. G. J. O. 
Folte and Wm. D. Newhouse; Goodfellow, Eells & Orrick, General Attor- 
neys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer. George Tourny, J. 
W. Van Bergen. Egn. Stelnhart, I. N. Walter. F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. 
"Kruse and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH— 2672 Mission Street, between 21st and 22d streets. 
For receipt and payment of deposits onlv. C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH— 432 Clement street, between 5th and 
fith avenues. For receipt and payment of deposits only. W. C. Heyer, 
Manager. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

N. W. COR. OF SUTTER AND SANSOME STS. 

Paid Up Capital J4.000.000.00 

Reserve and Undivided Profits 1.700,000.00 

Deposits 33.500.000.00 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10.300.000.00 

Slg. Greenebaum, President 
H. Flelshhacker. Vlce-Pres. & Mgr. A. Jlochsteln AssL Cashier 



C. R. Parker Asst Cashier 

Wm. H. High Asst. Cashier 

H. Choynskl Asst. Cashier 

G. R. Burdlck Asst. Cashier 



Jos. Frledlander Vice-President 

C. F. Hunt Vice-President 

R. Altschul Cashier 

A. L. Langerman Secretary 

Issues Travellers' Letters of Credit available In all parts of the world; 
buys and sells Foreign Exchange, and Issues drafts and cable transfers. 
Accounts of Banks. Bankers, Corporations, Firms, and Individuals 
Invited. SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



p RUBBER STamp 

Stencils. Seals. Signs &_ Etc. 



S60 MARKET ST. 



SOS rc/jF.ciSCO 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 




""?H 



mowm 



a 



Licenses were issued to the following new automobile owners 
in San Francisco and vicinity during the week ending July 15: 



GRANDY, G. C. R.. 0. S. S. So. Dakota. S. F. P. Hartford 

CORNWALL, A. F.. 103 Adams St.. Oakland Franklin 

WARREN. H. O.. 922 Kohl Building, S. F Chalmers 

SOLLMAX. T. W., 3541 21st St., S. F P. Hartford 

PATTON. A. B., San Rafael E-M-F. 

RUDE. C. N.. Corte Madera Premier 

LEVY. £ L.. 224 1st Ave.. S. F Franklin 

BAXKHAUSEN. L„ 166 1st Ave., S. F P. Hartford 

CONNORS, W. J., care Hayward Hotel, Hayward P. Hartford 

RED RAVEN SIGHT-SEEING CO., 780 Fell St, S. F Rapid 

MANX, H. F., Kentfield Loco 

ROBINSON. J.. Rio Vista E-M-F. 

ROCCA. G. B., 190 W. Santa Clara, San Jose Franklin 

FISHER. S. H. 2026 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley Cadillac 

JOHNSON, DR. EDITH. 375 Hawthorne St.. Palo Alto Maxwell 

CURLEY. MRS. .1. E., 1600 -list Ave.. Oakland S. Dayton 

MICK. L. F.. 500 Golden Gate Ave., S. F S. Duryea 

PAYSON. MRS. A. H., San Mateo Raueh & Dang 

MORRIS, B. J., S71 University Ave., San Jose E-M-F. 

MOULTON. MRS. NELLIE. Menlo Park Borland 

ROESCH. LOUIS, L886 Mission St.. S. F Buick 

STEVENSON. R. A., 790 California St., S. F Cole 

SIIEEHAN, J. F.. 623 Balboa Bldg., S. F Chalmers 

PEARSON, E. K., 2362 Bryant St.. S. F. ..., E-M-F. 

LANGE, C. E.. 220 Jayne Ave.. Oakland Maxwell 

EDWARDS, F., 33 Serpentine Place. S. F. Cartercar 

SCHMIDT, G.. 2009 Shattuck Ave.. Berkeley Flanders 

HALL, A. E.. 1110 Clay St., Oakland Flanders 

COAST MFG. & SUPPLY CO., 1022 66th Ave., Fitchburg Federal 

MARTENS. J.. 281 Van Buren St.. Oakland Columbus 

FULLER. G. C, 62 So. 1st St., San Jose Chalmers 

HOPKINS, W. J.. 1117 14th St., Oakland Ford 

WIBORN. DR. J. A., 391 Sutter St.. S. F Haynes 

BARLETTA, J.. 1419 Grant Ave., S. F. Loco 

CYPRESS LAWN CEM. ASSN., 350 Post St., S. F Detroit 

LATHROP, C. G., Stanford University Olds 

ZIMMERMAN. P., 2409 i inward St., S. F Packard 

GRIFFIN. F. W., 310 Sansome St., S. F Packard 

EHRMAN BROS. & CO.. 138 Front St.. S. F Ford 

THORNTON, J. C, San Jose Maxwell 

FRASER BROS., Rio Vista Buick 

GOLDEN "WEST BREW. CO.. 1504 Folsom St.. S. F Gramm 

MUSSO, JOHN, 306 Columbus Ave., S. F 

OVERHULSER, E. J.. 367 N. 13th St.. San Jose Ford 

KING. JOE, 415 Cement St.. S. F Cartercar 

HTJEBSCH, F. J., 1374 7th Ave., S. F Cartercar 

KELLER, H. W. A., 835 Golden Gate Ave.. S. F Metz 

NORMAN, E. H.. 1952 Fell St.. S. F Ford 

CAPPA. J.. £79 E. St, John. San Jose Ford 

GEE, J. F.. 1100 Santa Clara St.. Santa Clara Mitchell 

BROWN, E. W.. St. Helena Mitchell 

RICE, W. H.. 7th and Townsend Sts., S. F Loco 

NEWARK DEV. CO., 515 Phelan Bldg.. S. F Buick 

MARZOLF. GEO.. 1504 Folsom St., S. F Gramm 

"WOLTER, H. W.. 2233 Bryant St., S. F Buckeye 

MELTON, E. A., 9515 E. 14th St., Oakland Ford 

GALLAGHER, BESSIE, 27«7 Virginia St., Berkeley Herreshoff 

JAEGER, E„ 200 Van Ness Ave., S. F Loco 

GARREY, J. G.. Pacific Bldg.. S. F Loco 

SNOW & WATSON, Sebastopol Corbin 

PIERCE. MRS. M. G.. San Jose Regal 

GAMAGE, DAVID, 1452 Devlsadero St., S. F S. Dayton 

SANDERS. J. S., 784 So. 7th St. San Jose Regal 

TREWAVAS LEE & CO., 26 Montgomery St.. S. F Regal 

MILL VALLEY L. & INV. CO.. 26 Montgomery St.. S. F Rambler 

SEABROOKE. ERCEL M . r,jj Hyde St.. S. F Wlnton 

LA BOYTEAUX, W. H.. 240 California St.. S. F Packard 

SCHOTLER, J. H., 2fl;6 21st St., S. F P. Hartford 

CAIN. M. A.. 10th and Martha Sts.. San Jose Klsselkar 

EONETTI, H., Box 306 San Jose Apperson 

MOZART. E. H., 1464 McAllister St., S. F Cartercar 

MACHADO, J. J., San Mateo Metz 

EDWARDS. S. C. Hayward Rambler 

LINDSAY. M. J.. Ross Valley Marmon 

B. K. WOOD LUMBER CO., Oakland Buick 

RANDELIN, J. H.. 1823 Blake St.. Berkeley Buick 

MARTIN, JOHN. 572 Golden Gate Ave.. S. F Chalmers 

CULVER, H. W., 430 Lyon St., S. F Maxwell 



The agitation recently started looking toward greater safety 
in the automobile racing game is one well deserving of sup- 



port, and its consummation in genuine results looks at present 
to be the only salvation for the sport. The desirability of re- 
moving some of the suicidal features from motor car racing 
has long been recognized, but little has been done in achieving 
results. The present agitation gives promise, however, of some- 
thing more substantial. It has started immediately from the 
fatalities attending the Brighton Beach races during the early 
part of this month. On that occasion, it will be remembered, 
three deaths resulted in as many days, two drivers and one 
mechanician being the victims. The Brighton Beach track is 
an old dirt course for horse racing, and consequently is without 
those features of construction especially designed for safety 
in automobile speeding. To this, the accidents that occasioned 
the deaths are chiefly chargeable. As a consequence, a well- 
defined movement has been set on foot, with the purpose of 
eliminating all further automobile speed contests on dirt tracks 
and limiting the same henceforth to speedway, motordrome and 
road courses. The fight has been taken up by a number of the 
factories which have most prominently identified themselves 
with racing events in the past, and they are making the declara- 
tion that they will no longer risk the lives of their drivers in 
races over these dirt courses. The Lozier, than which none 
has been more active in racing circles, is among the factories 
which have taken this stand. If extensive enough, this attitude' 
of the factories would in itself make impossible the successful 
promotion of events for the objectionable courses. A much 
surer way, however, of putting unsafe tracks out of commission 
is the refusal of the A. A. A. to give sanction to proposed meets 
over any course except one particularly adaptable to motor car 
racing. In requiring its sanction for all automobile contests, 
the A. A. A. should be considered as giving its guarantee, so to 
speak, for such as receive that sanction, and this guarantee 
should extend to safety as well as to other questions of merit. 
Unless the A. A. A., which, as things now stand, is made to bear 
a considerable amount of censure, takes some decided stand in 
this matter, it bids fair to forfeit its present autocratic in- 
fluence in motoring circles. That a directorship such as that 
exercised by the A. A. A. can be most beneficial to motoring 
endeavors goes without saying. That the influence of the A. 
A. A. has been thus beneficial on many occasions is just as 
grantable. The fact remains, however, that no organization 
can rest on past laurels, and the A. A. A. may consequently ex- 
pect a demand that it insure greater safety in motor car racing. 
The question of safe tracks does not constitute the entire 
problem, however. It is quite as important that saner driving 
tactics be demanded than those which many of the pilots are 
inclined to use at present. The tendency of unseasoned drivers 
to enter the big meets is one of the most appalling sources of 
fatal accidents. It must be remembered that these green drivers 
not only take their own lives in their hands, but imperil the lives 
of the other drivers as well. An A. A. A. license based on ade- 
quacy of experience should be required of every driver where 
there is any considerable number of entries. There are other 
drivers of sufficient experience, who are dangerously reckless, 
however, and usually so with intent of out-daring their com- 
petitors and "getting their goats," to use the technical slang. 
The tactics of these drivers are decidedly unsportsmanlike and 
receive popular approbation only because of their bravado. This 
recklessness is so apparent as to be unquestionable, and should 
— after warning — be the grounds for the revocation of the 
A. A. A. license. 

* * * 

The aeronautical season in Europe has been an active one 
thus far, startling the entire world by the sensational features 
that many of the competitions have developed. The French 
aviators have captured the majority of honors to date. One 
of the most important victories ever won in the field of aero- 
nautics was that of Jules Vedrine in the Paris to Madrid race. 
The phenomenal speed made in this race, the long distance cov- 
ered, and the average altitude at which several of the aviators 
made flights were among the features distinguishing the meet. 
Vedrine's flight was marked by a battle with monster eagles 
above the high mountain crags over which he passed in Spain. 
The vicious attacks made by the birds on the aeroplane threat- 
ened for a time to wreck the machine. 

Vedrine also competed in the recent Paris to Rome race. 
While he was forced to quit before Rome was reached, he first 
rode at the most sensational speed at which any aviator has 
traveled. Leaving Dijon, Vedrine encountered a tornado which, 



jjly 22. 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



it is estimated, carried him over the 77.5 miles separating Dijon 
and Saint Laurent-Les-Maron in thirty minutes. At the end of 
that distance, his machine was wrecked and he was forced to 
withdraw from the race. Andre Beaumont, another French 
aviator, won the $20,000 purse for first reaching Rome. 

The death of three aviators and numerous less serious acci- 
dents that marked the recent Paris meet, which included the 
race to London and return, is the most appalling catastrophe 
that has yet attended aeronautic endeavors. It is reported that 
some agitation has been started in consequence looking toward 
the complete abolition of aeronautic contests in France. It 
would hardly seem, however, that such drastic measures are 
to be anticipated. That the best development of aeronautics is 
dependent on competitive contests goes without saying. France, 
probably more than any other nation, has recognized the possi- 
bilities of aerial navigation. She should be the last, therefore, 
to retard its progress by prohibitive laws. Numerous restric- 
tions, without going the full distance of prohibitive legislation, 
could, however, be made and to the advantage of aeronautics. 
A certain amount of safety could thus be assured, and at the 
same time those competitive features most essential to the de- 
velopment of the science retained. Dangerous stunts, so-called, 
which are principally spectacular and have little practical value, 
should be prohibited. 

Aeronautical tests, with certain competitive features, are re- 
ceiving much recognition from military sources. Practically all 
army maneuvres in Europe are attended by certain experiments 
with aeroplanes which are largely superseding the former bal- 
loon tests. The German areonautical meet under military super- 
vision, with prizes aggregating $25,000, was one of the most 
successful contests in Europe this season. Another military 
test that attracted more than usual attention was that pro- 
moted by the Japanese army authorities. This, as well as the 
German meet, demonstrated that the aeroplane will undoubtedly 
be of decided value in military operations. 

* * * 

The Aero Club of California, with headquarters at Los An- 
geles, is making preparations for an active season in Southern 
California this coming year of 1911 and 1912. Plans for meets 
are already being laid, with the reputation of former Los An- 
geles events arguing well for the success of these future en- 
deavors. George B. Harrison, who has been a member of the 
Executive Committee of the Aero Clubs of America, was re- 
cently elected president of the Los Angeles organization. He 
is one of the best authorities on aeronautics in the West, and is 
consequently well qualified to direct the important endeavors 
of the Southern California club. 

An undertaking already claiming large attention from the 
new official is the organization of a signal company to picket 
the aviation course. These pickets will replace the pylons 
which formerly marked the field. The reason for the innova- 
tion is the frequency of accidents caused by the collision of 
'planes with the pylons, where sharp turns are being taken. The 
difficulty has been met in France by the stationing of soldiers 
around the course instead of pylons. The signal companies 
which the Aero Club is organizing, and which will be specially 
drilled, are expecting to give service similar to that offered by 
the French soldiers. Numerous applications have already been 
received for membership in the company. 



A noticeable feature of this season's automobile racing has 
been the extensive use of Splitdorf magnetos by the victorious 
cars. It is well recognized that no accessory is more essential 
to the perfect running of a car than is the magneto. This is 
particularly true of machines competing in long races, where the 
element of endurance plays a prominent part in the final victory. 
One of the clean sweeps made by the Splitdorf this year was 
at the Bakersfield road races on the Fourth of July, where both 
victors, the National in the free-for-all and the Buick in the 
light car event, used this magneto, and to its efficiency attrib- 
uted a large measure of their success. The Mercer, which took 
third in the free-for-all, was also equipped with a Splitdorf, as 
was the Ford that won a like position in the light car division. 
A feature that adds more than the usual interest to the success- 
ful accessories in this race is the strenuosity of the course cov- 
ered. China grade, over which a part of the course lay, con- 
stituted a veritable hil! climb, while the rest of the road was 
both full of acute curves and rough. 



A practical utility for which the motor car is now being em- 
ployed is that of transferring funds between banks or between 
banks and sub-treasury. This method of conveying money is 
proving much safer than was the former transfer in an express 
wagon drawn by horses, no matter how well that express wagon 
was guarded. The speed with which the transfer can be made 
is naturally the chief element of security. One can easily real- 
ise that the holding up of an automobile would involve difficul- 
ties, making the attempt practically impossible in a city com- 
munity. The robbery of a bank wagon on some stretch of street 
seldom frequented was no uncommon occurrence in the former 
days when the horse was used. Usually one of the robbers 
grabbed the horse by the bit, brought it to a stop and cut the 
harness, while his accomplice or accomplices covered the driver 
and guards with guns and took over the booty. That an auto- 
mobile could be stopped in no such easy fashion goes without 
saying. One burst of speed from a motor car and the machine 
would be within police call, while effective shooting by the 
bandits, should they resort to this extremity, would be exceed- 
ingly improbable because of the swiftness of the car. The 
machine making the transfer is usually guarded by two other 
cars, one running ahead and the other to the rear. In some 
cases, where unusual care is necessary, armored motor trucks 
are used for this conveyance of money. A specially constructed 
steel-paneled vehicle, with certain automatic locking devices, 
is now being built in the East for this particular purpose, but in 
the ordinary a regular touring car offers sufficient security. 



An autoing party, composed of R. H. Pease, of the Goodyear 
Rubber Company, and his wife, his son-in-law, A. B. Watson, 
and wife, and S. L. Abbott and wife, has just left San Francisco 
with Portland, Ore., as a final destination. The party will first 
go to McCloud River, where a few days will be spent at the 
McCloud Country Club, of which Mr. Pease is a member. From 
this point, the run will be made to Portland on easy schedule, 
after which some time will be given to the exploration of the 
numerous auto touring routes in Oregon. The party employs 
two cars, one a Pope and the other a Locomobile. Both 
machines will be sent back to San Francisco from Portland by 
boat, and the autoists will make return by train. 



The Hartford Suspension Co., than which no firm is better 
known in the manufacture of automobile accessories, has just 
made announcement of a new safety crank which it is placing 
on the market. Beside absolutely eliminating the possibilities 
of a kick-back, the device is said to be so geared as to make the 
turning of the crank much easier than under the usual circum- 
stances. The Hartford Suspension Company also manufactures 
the Truffault-Hartford Shock Absorber. 



Six-cylinder popularity in America dates from June, 1907, 
when the Winton Motor Car Company, of Cleveland, convinced 
of six-cylinder superiority, abandoned all other types and be- 
came the world's first manufacturer of sixes exclusively. 

Not only has this radical step been completely justified in 
the splendid success of the Winton Six, !eut, furthermore, that 
success has made so marked an impression upon car buyers that 
their demands have impelled practically every high-grade 
maker in America to follow Winton's lead and produce sixes. 
To-day the six is the one car that high-grade buyers are talking 
about. 

The Winton Six which was first produced in June, 1907, had 
4 1 jx5 inch cylinders, producing 48 horsepower. It is interest- 
ing to note that the Winton six motor has continued year after 
year without the slightest change, and also that 48 horsepower 
is now the American standard power for six-cylinder cars. This 
is a high testimonial to Mr. Winton's judgment. 

"The Winton Six for 1912," says the Winton Company, "is 
the same 48 horsepower car we have produced continuously 
since 1907, without a single radical change. Its wheel base has 
been lengthened to 130 inches, and this permits of a more spa- 
cious and beautiful fore-door body. Our aim is mainly to give 
the buyer 'more car' without advancing the price. Accordingly, 
we are equipping the car with electric lights and demountable 
rims without extra charge." 

The Winton Six continues to have the only self-cranking 
motor on the market. A mechanism having only one moving 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 



part does the work by means of air pressure, which the motor 
produces. This self-cranking mechanism is never sold sepa- 
rately, and therefore is never found on any other car. 

Other features of the Winton six are a multiple disc clutch 
and a four-speed transmission, both running on ball bearings; 
Winton-Stromberg carburetor, Bosch or Eisemann magneto, 
Exide storage battery for starting, vanadium springs, and 36x 
4% inch tires all around. 

Notwithstanding the increasing demand for six-cylinder cars, 
and especially for this trail-blazing Winton six, the price re- 
mains unadvanced at $3,000. The world's lowest sworn repair 
expense record of 43 cents per one thousand miles is held by 

the Winton six. 

* * * 

Percy Walker, Pacific Coast representative for the American 
Automobile Association, is to be commended on the stand he is 
taking in regard to the practice made by many of the local 
dealers in entering machines in the various sanctioned meets, 
and then not having the car on the ground for competition when 
the race i? called. Walker declares that, unless this sort of 
thing stops, he will place the ban of the A. A. A. on all dealers 
continuing in the practice. There is an A. A. A. provision that 
all cars entered in an event must compete, and in case of no 
competition, the offending party may be excluded from further 
participation in sanctioned meets. It is this provision that 
Walker proposes to erforce. It is becoming the regular thing 
that a spectator, after paying his admission fee to see a meet 
on representations made by the published entry list, finds that 
less than a third of the cars actually enter the races, and that 
one or more of the races, if not actually called off, develops 
into a one-sided contest between two cars because of the fail- 
ure of the others to make appearance. It goes without saying 
that this is bringing the local automobile racing game into dis- 
repute, and that the A. A. A. will have demonstrated a genuine 
value for itself, if it calls a halt to the practice, as Walker 
proposes. The reasons for these spurious entries are beside 
the question. They come most frequently, however, as an at- 
tempt to steal some undeserved publicity. The fault, of course, 
sometimes lies with the promoter who wishes to attract a large 
attendance by promising a large entry list, and who is too 
short-sighted to see that he is killing his own game. The A. 
A. A. ruling applies to this promoter as well as to the dealer 
making false entry, and, if Walker goes after things as he 
promises, the promoter so doing will be refused further sanc- 
tion for meets. 

* * * 

Abroad in a Stevens-Duryea Car. 

Mr. H. W. Westpha: writes the Pacific Motor Car Company 
from Zurich, Switzerland : "We have been over high mountain 
passes with our Stevens-Duryea, far above the snow level. We 
intend to go over St. Gotthard Pass in a few days." That Mr. 
Westphal is an enthusiastic Stevens-Duryea owner is evidenced 
by the following extract : "The only trouble I have experienced 
on the entire trip has been with tires, and I would advise all 
Americans touring in Europe to have their rims fitted with the 
European-sized tubes, gs American sizes are hard to obtain; the 
cost is high and the delay is annoying." 

* * * 

The general idea in the automobile world seems to be that 
for draught work one needs a specially built shop car or truck. 
It is interesting to note, therefore, that the Holy Cross Cemetery 
has found a unique use for their new Cole "30" roadster, which 
proves the practical utility possibilities of the pleasure vehicle. 
This cemetery maintains the lawns by the use of a large mower 
which formerly kept eight horses busy. The Cole car. is now 
hitched to the mower, however, and is doing the work of the 
entire eight horses most satisfactorily. It is also found that the 
car is less injurious to the lawn than were the hoofs of the 
eight horses. 



IS YOUR IGNITION INSURED? 

800,000 
BOSCH MAGNETOS 

In Actual Use. Is Yours Bosch Equipped ? 





The Tough White 




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temperature or 


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blistering sands. 


TIRES 


THE B. F. GOODRICH 




CO., of California 




.341 Market Street, San Francisco 




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THE 

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1564- 1556 VAN NESS AVENUE 



SPARKING BATTERIES 
Loaned. Charged and 
Overhauled. Expert 
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Repairing. 
Phone Franklin 1275 
San Francisco 



Guarantee Battery Co. 



630 Van Ness Ave. 

Phone Franklin 2772 

"jEifoe" BATTERIES 

Batteries Charged and 
Overhauled 

Automobile Wiring 

Electric Accessories 

Etectrobola Head and 

Side-Lights 

Coil Repairing 



162 5 Pacific Ave. 

PHONES: 
Franklin 1510 C 4760 

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ELECTRIC 
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Electrical Vehicle Charging 

and Repairing 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 



INSURED AGAINST 



Fire, Theft, and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States, Canada, and Europe 

AETNA INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD 

PACIFIC BRANCH— 514 California Street, San Francisco 



SIMPLEX MOTOR CARS 

SIMPLEX PACIFIC COAST AGENCY 

J. N. SURGE, Manager 

124-126 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 



GASOLINE 

SAFETY 

APPLIANCE 

CO. 



We will equip your automobile with 
n safety Device which is screwed Into 
the filling hole of the gasoline tank. 
and guarantee no explosion will take 
place, even though you happen to drop 
a lighted match Into the tank. 

349 Van Ness Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



Vulcanizing 



PEART & ELKINGTON 



Ph»n» Mark.t 6170. 



FOR SALE.— Autocar Runabout, with top, lamps and generator, In good 
condition. Price, 1150. Apply 21 Sutter street 



4a Van N,m Avanut. 



•an Pranclaca, Cal. 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



Speaking of the commercial importance of San Francisco, 
past, present and future, C. E. Mathewson, Pacific Coast 
manager of the Diamond Rubber Company, of New York, says : 

"California stands second only to New York in the eyes of 
the automobile world. So rapid has been the advancement of 
the industry in the past few years that the prediction seems 
reasonable that 1915 — Panama-Pacific Exposition year — will 
see California the premier State respecting the number of auto- 
mobiles registered. To one who has closely watched the 
growth since 1906, the advancement has been meteoric. In 
California, the touring season is from January to January — 
there is no month of the entire year but that the pleasures 
of automobiling can be enjoyed to the fullest extent. This 
exceptional climate is no doubt one of the chief reasons for 
the popularity of the automobile here. Following closely, how- 
ever, is the fact that no State can begin to compare with Cali- 
fornia in the beauty and diversity of scenery offered. East, 
West, South or North, practically every road reveals some 
startling bit of nature's handiwork that cannot help but keep 
interest at a high pitch. California's roads are improving 
daily, thanks to the splendid work being done by 'Good Road' 
clubs throughout the State. The expenditure of the $18,000,000 
recently appropriated in this State for improvement of roads 
will no doubt prove to be one of the greatest stimulants to the 
industry. From the point of the tire manufacturers, California 
promises a most prosperous future. Like the automobile busi- 
ness, this State in volume of business stands second only to New 
York, and the way New York's record is being overhauled will 
soon place the Golden State in the van. 




THE 

BEST OIL 

for 

MOTOR CARS and 

MOTOR BOATS 

of any make. 

Next to your choice of the automobile or power 
boat you want, the choice of a lubricant is the most 
important thing. Poor lubricants will ruin the 
best motor in the world. 

Polarine gives that complete lubrication that gets 
every ounce of power out of a gas engine, with les- 
sened friction and 'wear. 

It burns cleanly and deposits 
no carbon. 

It keeps its body and feeds uni- 
formly under all running conditions 

Send for the Polarine booklet 
to the nearest agency of the 

Standard Oil Company 

(Incorporated) 




C. H. Howard, head of the Howard Automobile Company, 
Pacific Coast distributor of the Buick and .Oldsmobile cars, 
reached home last Saturday, after an absence of three weeks, 
which time he spent in a business and pleasure trip combined 
touring Southern California with his family in a Buick "40" 
touring car. The entire Southland was covered, and all the 
Buick agencies visited. Howard reports that he is well pleased 
with conditions, and that the outlook for the coming year is 
decidedly encouraging. The distribution of the Buicks and Olds- 
mobiles from the Southern branch of the Howard Automobile 
Company has been phenomenal this year, heavy deliveries con- 
tinuing at the present time, and there seems to be no indication 
of an abatement. 

• * • 

Mr. S. Persson, the well-known contractor, and family, have 
just returned from a most enjoyable trip to Lake Tahoe and 
Northern California. They made the trip in their seven-pas- 
senger Kline-Kar, and covered over seven hundred miles, with- 
out having to stop for the slightest trouble, adjustment or re- 
pair. Mr. Persson states that some of the roads are very rough, 
and when half way up Mt. Tallac they encountered a great deal 
of snow on the roads. He stated that the number of autoists 
making the trip this season is far greater than any previous 
year. 

» * * 

Messrs. Frank O. and Gus L. Renstrom, accompanied by 
Messrs. Albert and Gus Lehrke, families and friends, had a 
very enjoyable trip to Sonoma County Sunday last. They made 
the trip in two 6-cylinder Kline-Kars. 



SPLITDORF 
Again Winner 

AT THE BAKERSFIELD ROAD RACE, JULY 4 

ISO Miles, Free-for-All, won by Herrick in a 
SPLITDORF equipped National. Time 2.58.58. 
Seifert in a SPLITDORF equipped Mercer 
finished third. 

110 Miles for Light Cars, won by Nikrent in a 
SPLITDORF equipped Buick. Time 2.20.01. 
Parker in a SPLITDORF equipped Ford, third. 

PERFECT IGNITION ON EVERY CAR 

Sooner or later you'll insist on a SPLITDORF for your 
car. Why not now? 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH 

520 VAN NESS AVE. 
San Francisco 



RENAULT "The Car" Guaranteed For Life 






Closed Cars 


Touring or Runioouls 




complete 


complete 


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1 H. P. 


$3000 


2500 


10 H. P. 4 cjl. 


3500 


3000 


12-16 H. P. 


4000 


3200 


14-20 H. P. 


5500 


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18-24 H. P. 6 cjl. 


•'Little Sii" 6250 


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20-30 H. P. 4 cjl. 


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25-35 H. P. 4 cjl. 


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ALL CARS BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR AMERICAN ROADS. 



RENAULT FRERES SELLING BRANCH INC. 



116-120 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



Telephone, Market 7038 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 



One of the largest single orders for motor trucks in New York 
City within the last few months was placed yesterday by Gim- 
bel Brothers, the big department store merchandisers. The 
order was for eight Alco two-ton trucks. Gimbel Brothers al- 
ready have five Alco trucks in service. Three are in New York 
City and two in Philadelphia. All of them are of three-ton 
capacity. On the basis of the efficient service given by these 
Alcos, the big repeat order was placed. 

Five of the two-ton Alcos will be equipped with furniture 
type of bodies, two of the rack type and one of the stake type. 
These trucks will be used in the general transportation service 
of the company. 

"This is one of the most satisfactory sales ever made by 
the American Locomotive Company in trucks," said Harry S. 
Houpt, manager of sales. "We did not have to 'sell' Gimbel 
Brothers on the motor truck as a means of economical trans- 
portation. They were already 'sold.' 

"Gimbel Brothers are among the largest users of motor trucks 
in the country, and the mere fact that they are increasing their 
motor truck equipment by an order such as this is a good indi- 
cation that tne motor truck is 'here.' " 



"Who wiil be the new race driver for the Cole 30 racing 
team?" This question is giving much concern to the racing 
fraternity because of the action of J. J. Cole in sending in his 
entries for two cars for the Elgin National road race, naming 
but one driver. The names of many prominent race drivers are 
connected with the theories advanced, but Mr. Cole claims at 
present the secret is held by a few. 

Johnny Jenkins will drive one of the Cole cars in the Elgin 
race — this is settled. But the second car's driver is the one for 
speculation. Mr. Cole says: "I have my driver selected, but 
for various reasons am not ready to announce his name. He 
will be a good driver and a man with a national reputation." 

The Cole cars will enter the Kane County trophy event, using 
two of their stock cars. As the Cole cars are built on one 
chassis, the firm will be able to determine just what their 1912 
product is to be, as it is the present intention to use 1912 
material in these races. 

The Cole racing teams have engaged their quarters for the 
race right along the course. It is Mr. Cole's intention to place 
his racing crews and attaches under canvas for the event. 



The Krebs-Gotshall Motor Car Company, of Denver, has 
succeeded the Krebs-Covington Automobile Co., Mr. Coving- 
ton retiring and Mr. N. S. Gotshall succeeding him. The new 
firm will handle the Lozier and Detroit Electric, with new sales- 
rooms at 741 Broadway. Mr. Covington will retain the agency 
for the Hupp. 

Krebs-Covington Co. accepted the agency for the Lozier car 
less than six months ago. They have been unusually success- 
ful since Mr. Gotshall associated himself with the organization 
about ninety days ago, since which time the Lozier car has 
caught the fancy of Denver motorists. The new organization 
has become a big factor in Denver trade circles. The breaking 
of the Denver-Colorado Springs road record, the most sought- 
for intermountain road record, which feat was accomplished 
twice in one day by the Lozier, attracted a great deal of atten- 
tion to the car, especially as repeatedly unsuccessful attempts 
have since been made by other cars to lower this record. 



"Over 1200 horses died from the heat in New York City dur- 
ing the eleven days of the hot spell," said Harry S. Houpt, 
manager of sales of the American Locomotive Company. A 
well-known packing concern is reported to me as having suf- 
fered a loss of $70,000 in horseflesh throughout the country, 
while another large organization, I am informed, met with a 
loss of $40,000. Aside from sentiment, this situation offers a 
mighty good argument for the motor truck. I doubt if there 
was a truck in New York City affected by the heat sufficiently 
to put it out of service. Estimating that horses are worth $250, 
the total loss in horseflesh in New York City would have been 
$300,000, while the loss throughout the country doubtless 
reached over a million dollars. $300,000 would purchase 100 
good trucks of a dozen different makes, and these trucks would 
have outlived the horses two to one, traveled twice as fast and 
three times as far per day." 



Having sent the new Everitt "six" over the route between 
Buffalo and Worcester, Mass., with conspicuously good results, 
the Metzger Motor Car Company is now trying out its new 
Everitt Four-36 over the same route; and from reports re- 
ceived at the factory, this car will behave as well as did its 
larger sister. The car is being driven by Frank Gremmel, a 
Detroiter, who, since he successfully drove in a 24-hour race in 
Detroit some five years ago, has gained a considerable repu- 
tation in endurance and road work. Accompanying him is Wil- 
liam A. Carpenter, sales manager for Harrington Bros., the 
New England distributors for Everitt cars. After the car com- 
pleted its run from Buffalo to Worcester, it was started on the 
road again for a month's touring, the purpose of which will be 
to acquaint New England with it. 



Mr. G. F. Hanson, of 555 Fillmore street, San Francisco, has 
written a letter to the Michelin Tire Company, 308 Van Ness 
avenue, reading as follows : 

"I have used a Michelin Tire, size 30x3% inches, on my car 
for more than a year and a half, and although it is impossible 
for me to estimate the service this tire has given with accuracy, 
it has worn out several other tires on the same car. It is now 
worn down through several layers of fabric, but is still run- 
ning." 

The Michelin Tire Company states that a large number of 
its customers have shown substantial appreciation of this kind, 
and that they have a large number of these letters on file to 
show to parties interested. 



Barney Oldfield says: "Firestone tires won eleven firsts out 
of eighteen events on July 4th at Brighton Beach. Bob Bur- 
man broke the world's circular dirt track record, making a mile 
in 48:72. seconds. Burman says no tires are as safe to use as 
Firestone." Barney Oldfield, Bob Burman, Ray Harroun, Earl 
Cooper, Casey Thompson, E. A. Herrick, have all won their 
laurels on Firestone regular stock tires, and their individual 
and collective records are certainly a fitting testimonial as to 
safety, dependability and endurance. 



TIRES 

5,000 MILES 

There is one big feature about AJAX 
TIRES that make them different from 
e.very other tire: the service they 
render under all conditions. 

Not only are AJAX TIRES as strong 
and well made as any en the market 
and sold at no higher price — but they 
positively give 30 <$, more service. 

The user of AJAX TIRES is assured 
of long tire mileage, and absence from 
tire troubles — the kind of service 
every motorist wants and which AJAX 
TIRES are guaranteed to give. 



Hughson & Merton 

PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS 

544 VAN NESS AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO 

Los Angeles Portland Seattle 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



31 




ABSOLUTELY STANDARDIZED 

WHAT IT MEANS WHEN 
YOU BUY AN OVERLAND 

No automobile maker in the world to-day works to closer limits In fineness of fit than does The "Willys-Overland Company. If this ad- 
vertisement will cause you to act — and induce you to make an investigation of the claims we make for Overland cars and compare them 
with others, it will have accomplished its mission. Make your comparison thoroughly, part by part. The more thoroughly your investiga- 
tion, the stronger your conviction will be that the Overland is a car standing on the pedestal, so to speak, above all others. 

Compare the motor in an Overland car with the best car you know, selling for three, four or five hundred dollars more. You will find 
a power plant giving greater efficiency, reliability, quietness and flexibility — no matter what another may cost. 

Compare the body of the Overland with others. You will find them built better, finished better, upholstered better, and of excellent design. 

Compare the springs, the riding qualities, the speed, the hill-climbing ability, the wheel base, the frame, transmission, brakes, rear system, 
size of wheels and axles, steering gear. All these points will stand the minutest comparison with any automobile of the same price, and 
prices far exceeding for what the Overland is selling for. 

Unlimited facilities, enormous production of exact standardized duplicates an ideal organization built up, controlled and directed by one 
man — John N. Willys — enables us to make a minimum price on the maximum of motor car efficiency. 

THE WILLYS-OVERLAND COMPANY, Toledo, Ohio 



J. W. LEAVITT & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS 

PORTLAND 




SEATTLE 



Wheeibase 
118 inches 

5-Passenger 

40 H. P. 

4-Cylinder 

motor 

Tires 34 i 4 
Price $1600 



WITH FORE DOORS 



mmmmm 



wmmmmmm 



—-/ 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 
SAN MATEO. — San Mateo Garage (fire proof), 350 B street. 'Phone 
Mateo 404. Morton & Beer, Props. Open day and night Expert automo- 
bile repairing, supplies, battery charging, high-grade gasoline and oils. 
Electric vehicle charging. 

NORTH OF BELMONT. — Cypress Lodge. First-class mixed drinks. 
Bring your lunch baskets and enjoy our little forest. Special attention to 
motor parties. CHAS. P. HOWKE, Prop. 

REDWOOD CITY.— REDWOOD CITY GARAGE. 701 Mound St. Miller 
Paulsen, Prop. Vulcanizing, gasoline and oils. Complete machine shop. 
Repairs and all work guaranteed. Tel. Black 293. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
PALO ALTO. — Palo Alto. Garage, the only first-class lire-proof garage 
in Palo Alto. 443 Emmerson street lone and a half blocks from depot). 
Expert automobile mechanics. High-grade oils, gasoline and sundries. 
Phone P. A. 333. 

SANTA CLARA.— SANTA CLARA GARAGE. C. P. Pait; E. C. Molltor. 
Home of the Marion. Autos for hire. Gasoline and oil. and all kinds of 
sundries and repairs. Phone: S. C. 93. 1049-51 Washington St., Santa 
Clara, Cal. Always ready. 

SAN JOSE. — Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St James Sts. 

SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street The best French 
dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

SAN JOSE.— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE. Market and St. James 
street 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler, Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. (See under Stockton.) 

GILROY. — Central Hotel, A. C. Richardson, Prop. Headquarters for au- 
tomobilists. Bar in connection. Newly furnished throughout Telephone 
Main 861. 

GILROY.— FOWLER'S GARAGES (one on North Main street: the other 
near S. P. Depot.) Phones Main 463 and Main 1093. Rent cars at all hours. 
Tires and Sundries in stock; gasoline, oil, repairing, lathe work, vul- 
canizing. Open day and night. 

SANTA CRUZ.— Bull's Fire-proof Garage. 269 Pacific avenue. 6 and 7 
passenger autos for hire. Auto sundries and repairing. Phone 269. 

MONTEREY COUNTY. 
SALINAS.— COOPER'S GARAGE. Phillips & Rossi, Props. Phone Main 
56. No. 320 Main street. Open day and night. Expert repairing. Supplies. 
Gasoline and oils. Two rent cars. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 
PASO ROBLES. — Pioneer Garage, fireproof. W. C. Henderson, prop.; 
agents for Buick and Maxwell. Five and seven -passenger cars for hire. 
Expert repairing. Open day and night High-grade gasoline and oils. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO.— CALIFORNIA GARAGE. A. Luchessa, Proprie- 
tor. Dealer in Automobiles and Bicycles. Repairs and supplies. Every- 
thing complete. Building fhe-oroof. 879-881 Higuera St., San Luis 
Obispo, Cal. Phone 789 R. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 
SANTA MARIA.— SANTA MARIA GARAGE. W. L. Donnelly. Prop. 
Phones, Main 1861; Home 41. General automobile work; gasoline, oil, 
sundries, tires, etc. All work guaranteed. Night phone Sunset Main 340. 

LOS OLIVOS.— MATTEI'S TAVERN. Felix Mattel. Prop. Finest hunt- 
ing and fishing in season. Headquarters for sportsmen and automobile 
parties. Mountain trout served at meals during season. 

SANTA BARBARA.— MISSION GARAGE, 1221-23 State St., near Arling- 
ton Hotel. E. G. Hayward, Prop. The finest fire proof garage In Southern 
California. Automobile supplies, repair shop. Open day and night. 
Phones, Home 2243; Pacific 191. Rent and touring cars. 



VENTURA.— MERCER'S GARAGE (fire proof.) 
Open day and night Phones Main 17 and Home 7. 
gasoline and sundries. Rent and touring cars. 



W. E. Mercer. Prop. 
Expert repairing, oils, 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL.— WHITE GARAGE (fire proof) Eighth and 
Olive streets. Phones Main 8133; Home 10379. First-class hostelry for 
the care and maintenance of automobiles. Open day and night. Experi- 
enced employees. Pits, workbenches, etc., for free use of tourists. Gaso- 
line and supplies. 

PASADENA. — Don Lee, Cadillac Garage, 17,000 square feet of floor 
space, centrally located, 151 E. Union St., absolutely fireproof. Steel 
lockers for lap-robes and tools,- etc. Service at all hours, day or night 
Write for descriptive booklet L. G. PATEE, Manager. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. ~~~ ~~~ 

STOCKTON.— WALLACE Bros.' GARAGE. 30 S. Sutter Street Moat 
convenient location. Best ot service. Large stock sundries. Rambler, 
Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. Phone Main 287. (See San Jose.) 

SONOMA COUNTY. 

PETALUMA.— PETALUMA GARAGE, Sparks & Murphy, Proprietors. 
(Successors to McNear Garage.) General machine work. Supplies, re- 
pairing and auto livery; lubricating oils and gasoline. First-class ac- 
commodations for ladles. Corner Third and C streets. Tel. Petaluma 3, 
California. 

SANTA ROSA.— HOUTS AUTO CO.. Mendocino Avenue, one-half block 
north of Court House. Expert automobile repairing, supplies, tires, oils 
and gasoline. Opt>n day and night Telephone 527. Agents Overland, 
Stoddard -Dayton, KIssel-Kar. 

LAKE COUNTY. 
LAKEPORT.— LAKEVIEW HOTEL, leading and best-appointed hotel 
in town. Headquarters for automobile touring parties and commercial 
men. Phone Main 1. Geo. Beebe, Prop., Lakeport, Cal. See him — that's all. 

LAKEPORT.— LAKEPORT GARAGE. Vulcanizing, batteries charged, 
gasoline and lubricants. First-class machine work. One block from 
Postofnce. F. E. Watkins, Prop. Phone Main 521. 



FISK 

TIRES 



"THE STANDARD 

OF QUALITY" 

Made to fit 
all Style rims 

For Sale by All Dealers' 



Firestone 

TIRES AND DEMOUNTABLE RIMS 

THE FIRESTONE TIRE AND RUBBER CO. 
Cor. Van Ness and Fulton San Francisco 






Motor Cars 



The Thomas B. Jeffery Company of California, 121-123 Valencia Street, San Francisco 



Th 



e vm o t 



Hughson An d Merton 



WILL NOT BURN— LASTS INDEFINITELY 
FACTORY 
REPRESENTATIVES 



d Brake 
Lining 



544 Van Ness Ave. 
San Francisco 



San Francisco 



Fresno 



Seattle 



Portland 



Spokane 



Los Angeles 

Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co., Inc. 

AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES Pacific Coast Agents HARTFORD TIRES 

501-509 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



Champion Wind Shield Manufacturing Company 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

=^i^^e GLASS FRONTS FOR AUTOMOBILES 

QUALITY STRENGTH SIMPLICITY 

Absolutely Guaranteed 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



33 



Look for This Sign 
on leading Garages 




You cannot know what 
a good tire is until you 
try a MICHELIN pro- 
perly inflated. 

MICHELIN TIRE 
COMPANY 

308-314 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco 

Phone Market 800 



STEVE NS- 
DURYEA 
"SIX" 



For supreme satisfaction In tour- 
ing: the STEVENS-DURYEA SIX. 
With Its "unit power plant" 
mounted on "three points," it has 
the maximum of power efficiency, 
the minimum of friction and strain, 
and a motor flexibility that Is 
truly delightful. 

PACIFIC MOTOR CAR 

CO., Distributors 

Golden Gate Avenue at Polk Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 



JONES 
SPEEDOMETERS 



Accurate and 
Reliable 

544 Van Ness Ave. 
San Francisco. Cal. 



GOODYEAR 

NO RIM CUT 

TIRES 



Factory Branch 

THE GOODYEAR TIRE AND 

RUBBER CO. 

361-363 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 



HOWARD 

AUTOMOBILE 

COMPANY 



Distributors for Pacific Coast 
BUICK and OL.DSMOBILES 



523-S33 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco. Cal. 



Phone: Market 1635 and 1536 
Home J 2313 



MONOGRAM 
OIL 



Louis Dlsbrow used Monogram Oil 
when he made his world's record at 
the recent Pablo Beach Races in 
Florida with his Pope-Hartford car. 

This adds another to MONOGRAM'S 
long list of achievements. Make 
the expert's choice your choice. 



AUTO TOPS 

SEAT COVERS 

LAMP COVERS 

ETC. 



Auto Top Manufacturing 

Company 

LOUIS J. CARL. Manager 

425-431 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



AUTO 

COMMERCIAL 

PHOTO CO. 



AUTOMOBILE PHOTOGRAPHS 

A SPECIALTY 

568 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 



EXPERT 

AUTOMOBILE 

PAINTING 



P. J. KRUG 

426-431 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco 

Woodworking. Blacksmithing 

and every known repair for 

the automobile 

All Work Guaranteed 



KEENAN BROS. 



Machinists and Engineers 

Automobile Repairing a Specialty 

350 Golden Gate Avenue, bet. Hyde 

and Lai kin Streets 
Phones: Franklin 6823. Home J 2012 



PANHARD 
OIL 



FREE FROM CARBON 

L. H. & B. I. BILL 

643 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



THE MARION 



The Thousand Man Car 
As Quiet as a Mouse 

Thos. O. Heydenfeldt 
Distributor 

640 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco. Cal. 



HARTFORD 

SHOCK 
ABSORBERS 



Makes All Roads Smooth Roads 

CHANSLOR & LYONS MOTOR 

SUPPLY CO. 

501 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco. Cal. 



McTARNAHAN 
VULCANIZING 
AND TIRE CO. 



Compare Our Prices and 
Bargains 

630 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco 



DORIAN 

REMOUNTABLE 

RIMS 



And TW1TCHELL AIR GAUGES 
W. D. NEWERF RUBBER CO. 

545 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 



LEO GILLIG 



Auto Tops. Upholstering. Seat Covers. 
Etc. Automobile Painting, Varnish- 
ing. Blacksmithing, Woodworking 
and Body Making. Repairing in all 
Its branches. First Class Work. 
Reasonable Rates. Fire Proof Build- 
Ine- iV-J Grove St.. near Franklin 
St.. San Francisco. Phones: Park 
1323. Home S 2338, 



MOHRIG 
BROS. 



New Things For The Motorist 

and the Best 

S4: Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco, Cal. 



DIAMOND 
TIRES 



Give Greatest Milage 

THE DIAMOND RUBBER CO. 
of New York 

C. E. Mathewson. Pacific Coast Mgr. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



REMY 
MAGNETO 



REMY ELECTRIC CO. 

170 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC 

AUTOMOBILE 

EXCHANGE 



The Largest Automobile Repair Shop 
In the West 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

465 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco. Cal. 

CORREJA CARS 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 



STEARNS ADOPTS THE 

— — " THE ENGINE USED BY 

FEATURE OF THE x 



Used By 



| His Majesty, The King | 
of England 

I .His Imperial Majesty, 
The Czar of Russia 

I Her Imperial Highness, 
The Dowager Empress I 
of Russia 

| Her Royal Highness, 
The Crown Princess 
of Sweden 

| His Royal Highness, 
Prince Arthur of 
Connaught 

| Her Grace, The Duchess | 
of Bedford 

| Her Grace, The Duchess | 

of Dundonald 

| His Grace, The Duke 
of Portland 

I The Right Honorable 
Earl Roberts 

| The Right Honorable 
The Earl of Cairns 

| The Right Honorable 
The Earl of Clarendon ] 

I The Right Honorable 
The Earl of Derby 

| The Right Honorable 
The Earl of Mars 
and Kellie 

I The Right Honorable 
The Earl of Yar- 
borough 

| Captain The Honorable 
Chas. Fitzwilliams, 
Equerry to King 
George V. 

I The Right Honorable 
Sir Horace Plunkett 

| Major & Honorable 
Lieut. Col. Wm. Forest J 

| Due de Leuchtenberg 
of Germany 

| Baron Van Pallandt 
of Holland 



SSfc ' SBBB^w-.'. 



The Engine That 

Supplanted t he Finest 

in the World 

A new factor has entered 
the automobile world. A factor 
of such vital importance — of 
such dominant force — that it is 
recognized as a revolution in 
motor car history. That factor 
is the Silent Knight engine. 

In the world's best cars this 
new type engine has displaced 
the power plants which made 
those cars pre-eminent. The 
finest engines the world has 
ever known have been sup- 
planted by the Knight. 

In England, France, Germany 
and Belgium — always the 
cradles of motor car develop- 
ment — the leading makers have 
admitted the supremacy of the 
Knight. And now the Stearns 
adopts it in this country. 

The Choice of Royalty 

Cars equipped with this 
motor are everywhere the 
choice of Kings — Emperors — 
Governments — of those accus- 
tomed to the best the world af- 
fords. In every country the 
greatest car now uses the Silent 

Knight — the Daimler in England, 
the Mercedes in Germany, the 



Panhard in France, the 
Minerva in Belgium and in 
America the Stearns. 

Silence— power — simplic- 
ity. The elimination at one 
stroke of all the shortcom- 
ings of other engines. The 
ability to steadily improve 
with use. In short, that is 
the new Steams-Knight. 

Where it Excels 

Power far greater than is 
possible in other engines is pro- 
duced. All complications are 
done away with. In their place 
is a silent, sweet running engine 
— an engine whose action is so 
gentle— so silky— that a spin 
behind the wheel is a revelation. 

It gives the owner an engine 
far in advance of anything be- 
fore produced — an engine that 
is always silent and vibrationless 
— that takes a sharp hill at alow 
speed or rushes it with quiet, 
irresistible power. An engine 
that runs silently along on high, 
barely turning over, yet with a 
touch of the throttle leaps eager- 
ly to any speed desired. It 
offers an engine that never 
complains — that a n s we r s in- 
stantly tothe throttle — an engine 
that is alert, quick and willing — 
that is never slow nor sluggish. 
An engine that minimizes gear 
shifting. 



THl 



It gives the owner an engine 
that takes him 'cross country at 
an even, tireless gait — that 
spurns hills without falter or 
tremor — that creeps silently 
through crowded streets or 
leaps willingly to the call of the 
open road. The "feel" of the 
engine — the touch — the re- 
sponse — all furnish a new sen- 
sation to the motorist — a sensa- 
tion of lightness — of eagerness. 

And above all, the Stearns- 
Knight grows better with thai 
years. The longer it is run, 
the smoother its operation, thai 
more power developed. It is 
simplicity itself — nothing com- 
plicated, nothing exposed, noth- 
ing to adjust. Power is pro- 
duced in a quiet, steady flow- 
produced in an engine so silent 
and vibrationless that experts 

TheF.B.S 

1651 VAN NESS AVE., SAN 



Sre 



BRANCHES— Los Angeles, Cal. : The Elmore Motor Car Co. 746 S. Olive St. 



Seattle, Wash.: A. C. Stevens, 1409 Broad; 



July 22, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



3S 



KNIGHT TYPE MOTOR 

S - THE LEADING r~ — 
RLD'S BEST CARS 



Wll 



IIMAlfc CAP 

1 T 



in cannot tell when it it run- 
j. Not only when the car is 
t, but after years of service. 

i Where it Differs 

l the Steam s-K night, action 
ot dependent upon ordinary 
res such as used in all other 
rcle American cars, with cam 
fts, springs, timinggears, etc., 
the attendant complications, 
ible. noise and loss of power, 
ead, in each cylinder are 
thin cylindrical shells of 
i— called "sleeves" — one in- 
* the other, sliding smoothly 
and down in a film of oil. 
se sleeves have ports in the 
s and as they pass each 
:r produce positive valve 
tiings impossible to secure 
ny other way. 

arns Co. 

ISCO, CALIF. 



The action of these 
'sleeves is silent and 
must always remain so. 
There is no noise and 
nothing to get noisy . 

The valve openings 
are certain and positive. 
Valves cannot carbon- 
ize or s eat improperly. 

The entire movement is pos- 
itive. No dependence is placed 
upon springs. 

Briefly, the new motor it — 

Silent, vibrationless, flex- 
ible, powerful and simple. 

There are no complications — 

No timing gears, cam 
shafts, poppet valves, 
springs or stems. 

There it no lost of power — 

Valves do not wear, com* 
pression does not lessen, 
power is not wasted. 

There is no guesswork — 

Action is not dependent 
upon springs— it is abso- 
lutely positive. 

Efficient in the extreme — 

More power is developed 
[ —all gas is utilized— cool- 
ing is much easier. 

Send for the Story 

The story of the Stearns- 
Knight has been told in booklet 
form. It is a story of gripping 
interest— a story of the bitter 



fight of Chas. Y. Knight of Chi- 
cago to win recognition for his 
motor. The telling of that story 
—how, beginning with an un- 
recognized invention, Knight is 
conquering the automobile 
world— is one of the most inter- 
esting bits of motor car reading 
matter ever published. 

We have told, too, of the 
wonderful trial of the Knight 
motors by the Royal Automo- 
bile Club of England. How 
rival manufacturers demanded 
a test, certain of the failure of 
the Knight— how the engines 
went triumphantly through the 
tests (voluntarily made the 
severest ever attempted.) We 
have told how, after weeks of 
day and night testing in the 
laboratory and on the famous 
Brooklands track (a test equal 
to two years of service) these 
wonderful engines developed 
more power at the finish than 
at the beginning, and showed 
no sign of wear ! We have 
told why no maker of poppet 
valve engines dare attempt 
to equal this showing . 

These booklets and "A Ride 
With The Chief— telling the 
story of the Stearns-Knight in 
the words of our Chief Engi- 
neer — will be sent upon re- 
quest. Clip the coupon and 
mail it to us or drop us a 
postal. The booklets will be 
mailed to any 
address. 



Used By 

I His Majesty, The King 
ot Belgium 

I His Majesty, The King 
1 of Spain 

I Hie Royal Highness, 
The Crown Prince of I 
Servla 

I His Royal Highness, 
The Duke of Sparta 

| The Grand Duchess 
Vladimir of Russia 

I Marquise Villalobar of 
Spain 

I Prince Obiensky ot 
Russia 

I Comte de Petschy of 
Russia 

| Marquise deToulongeonl 
of France 

[ Baron de Neutlire ot 
France 

| Count de Bousles of 

Belgium 

I Count H. van den Burgh I 
of Belgium 

Marquise de Fsyal of 
Portugal 

>uke Louie Decai-es ot 
France 

ilgnor Don Garcia un- 
burn of Argentine 

I Signor Oon Ramon de 
la Sola of Spain 

[ Baron de Bancel ol 

France 

I Prince Chimay ol France J 

[ Baron Profume ot 
France 

| Count Leonce van de 
Werve of Belgium 

| Count de Remain ot 
Belgium 

| The Amir ol Afghanistan | 

I The Rajah ot Dhar 

I Madam Sarah Bernhardt I 




tf»*u 



Coupon *"'* 

•be FB SteamiCo.i San Francisco. Cal 

Gentlemen 

Send your booklets and catalogs tell- 
>nj the story of the Steams-Rrucrhj 

Name ... • — 

Address 



nd, Or.: Stearns Auto Co., 6th and Madison Sts. 



Dealers in all other principal towns and cities. 



36 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 22, 1911. 




Mrs. Mumps — Your 'usband wears 'is 'air terribly short, 

Mrs. Gibbins. Mrs. Gibbins — Yes, the coward. — M. A. P. 

"He always was a bad egg, but nobody seemed to notice 

while he was rich." "Yes, he was alright until he v/as broke." 

The Marketer — Aren't you wasting a good deal of that 

steak in trimming it ? The Butcher — No, ma'am. I weighed it 
first. — Exchange. 

Speedy ('phoning from farmhouse to garage) — I guess 

you will have to come out and get me. I've turned turtle. Voice 
— This is a garage ; you want the aquarium. — judge. 

Maud — Jack said when he proposed that he could give 

me only the necessities of life. Ethel — And what did you say ? 
Maud — I told him that one of the necessities of life was a hus- 
band who could supply me with the luxuries. — Boston Tran- 
script. 

"Of course," said the surgeon, who had operated for ap- 
pendicitis, "there will be a scar." "That's all right," replied 
the patient. "Leave any kind of a mark that you like that will 
prevent some strange doctor from coming along and operating 
again." — Index. 

Wife — Wretch! Show me that letter. Husband — What 

letter? Wife — That one in your hand. It's from a woman, I 
can see by the writing, and you turned pale when you saw it. 
Husband — Yes. Here it is. It's your dressmaker's bill. — Neiv 
York Evening Mail. 

The freckle-faced boy who was 

about to be emancipated from high- 
school thraldom was writing his gradua- 
tion essay. "I suppose I ought to wind 
it up," he reflected, "with something 
touching and sentimental about the 
leather-headed, snub-nosed, squeaky- 
voiced, conceited old snoozer that runs 
the shebang." Thereupon he wrote: 
"And now, our dear and honored princi- 
pal, we turn to you," etc. — Chicago Trib- 
une. 

"Hi, mister," called the driver of 

a huge dray, "will you kindly hold my 
boss's head for me while I get down?" 
The pedestrian hesitated. "Well, I'll do 
my best," he observed, approaching gin- 
gerly, "though I don't know much about 
horses. Er — which one shall I hold?" 
"The off 'un," replied the driver. "Dear 
me! Poor thing!" exclaimed the pedes- 
trian. "Do you mean this sad-looking 
one?" "No, I don't!" cried the driver. 
"I said the off 'un, didn't I?" "Yes, I 
know you did," replied the pedestrian 
testily, "but as I wasn't at the parents' 
funeral, how the dickens am I to guess 
which is the orphan?" — Ex. 

Gen. Horatio C. King, secretary of 

the Society of the Army of the Potomac, 
was narrating at a dinner in Brooklyn his 
memories of the Civil War, says the 
New York Times. "We suffered many 
hardships on both sides," said General 
King, "but the brave Confederates suf- 
fered more. I remember a grizzled old 
negro who at the outbreak of the Spanish 
war applied for a place as an army cook. 
'What experience have you had?' T was 
cook, sah, fo' a confederate regiment in 
sixty-fo',' he answered. 'That is, sah, I 
had the job of cook, but, to tell the truth, 
I didn't work at all.' 'Why not?' 'There 
wasn't nothing to cook, sah.' " — Ex. 




Miss Henrietta was not a sylph by any means, but she 

prided herself upon the neatness of her well-rounded figure, and 
when she appeared on the hotel veranda one summer day with a 
cluster of white oxeye daisies pinned against the crisp freshness 
of her green linen frock, gallant old Colonel Floyd was moved 
to make her a pretty speech. "What charming posies!" he re- 
marked, with a Chesterfieldian bow. "They suit you exactly. 
You look like a Virginia hillside." He was mystified at the 
frigidity with which Miss Henrietta received his bit of homage. 
— Youth's Companion. 



■ — —For Sale.— 1910 Winton Automobile. Perfect condition; 
fully equipped. Warner Speedometer; top; glass front; clock; 
tire irons; trunk rack; Prest-o-Lite tank; electric and oil lamps; 
two horns — bulb and electric; two tire covers; two extra tires; 
two extra tubes. Address, Owner, 21 Sutter Street. 'Phone 
Kearny 3594. 




At Your Elbow 

THEY are all in reach at a moment's 
notice; the butcher, the grocer, the 
merchant, anyone you wish. 

Whether weather conditions are Stormy, threatening or 
fair, the Bell Telephone is in waiting to save unnecessary 
footsteps. 

Everybody is your neighbor; every town, county and 
state is next door. 

This is because the Bell System radiates throughout 
the country and is universal. 

^^ The Pacific Telephone 
and Telegraph Co. 




July 22, 1911. and California Advertiser 37 

Tight trains 

Every Day 



Each way between 
SAN FRANCISCO 

and 
LOS ANGELES CITY 



LUXURIOUSLY FURNISHED 
COMPLETELY EQUIPPED 



Some by day for the 
tourist and sightseer 
and those who would 
know the "Road of a 
Thousand Wonders," 
others by night for the 
convenience of the busy 
man and merchant. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

TICKET OFFICES: 
884 Market Street Market Street Ferry Depot 

Palace Hotel T""" 1 &nd Townsend Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO 




38 



POPULAR HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS. 



July 22, 1911. 




^if— 



Fitch Mountain Tavern 

NOW OPEN 



Three hours from San Francisco, on Russian river. Two miles 
of fine boating and bathing; livery and auto; hunting and fishing; 
dancing; giod music; raise our berries, fruit, etc.; big fireplace; 
no bar. One and one-half miles from Healdaburg; 'bus meets 
trains. $3 a day, $12 to $18 per week. Special rates to families. 
Trout hatchery in connection. 

A. M. EWING, Healdsburg 

Readers when communicating with this resort will please mention 
the News Letter. 



CASA DEL REY 



SANTA CRUZ 



CAL. 



300-Room Fireproof Hotel. 

Large and well-appointed 
Grill Room facing the 
Beach. 

Everything new and first-class. 

AN UP-TO-DATE AND MODERN HOTEL 



Anderson Springs 

The springs that did the business in Lake County last year. Now 
open. The greatest resort for health and pleasure; the only natural 
mineral steam baths In Lake County. Natural hot sulphur and 
Iron Baths. Board — $10 to $14 per week. No extra charge for 
baths. How to reach the Springs — Take Oakland ferry at 7:40 
a. m., or S. P. train to Callstoga, arrive 11:30 for lunch; Spiers 
stage to springs; arrive at Anderson Springs at 4 p. m., distance 
21 miles. Fare, $7 round trip from San Francisco. Address all com- 
munications to MISS ROSE ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Mid- 
dletown, Lake County, Cal. 

NOTE. — Best route for autos is via steamer to Vallejo, thence 
through Napa, Callstoga and Middletown. Perfect roads all the way. 



Make LAKE COUNTY by the Scenic Route 

The most comfortable way to make Lake County is by Wm. Spier's 
stage line over the best mountain road in Cal. Grand scenery; easy 
carriages; careful drivers; round trip from San Francisco to Harbin, 
Anderson and Mira Vista, $7; to Adams, Seiglers; Bonanza, Ho- 
bergs. Howard, Astorg, Spiers and Glenbrook, $9. Stages leave 
Callstoga 11:30 a. m., Sundays excepted. Half hour for lunch at 
Callstoga. Fifty pounds baggage allowed. Automobiles furnished 
when desired. Tickets on sale at Southern Pacific Office. 



Locate your family and enjoy week-end visits at 

Hotel Del Monte 

Pacific Grove Hotel Pebble Beach Lodge Rancho Del Monte 

All under the same marUEemem and every guest entitled to all Del Monte privileges 
and attractions, including GOLFING, MOTORING. TENNIS, BATHING. FISHING. 
ARCHERY sod every outdoor sport. Take Del Monte Express going Friday. Saturday 
and Sunday, leaving Son Francisco 8:05 a. m. or 2 p. m. , arriving Del Monte 1 1 -.50 a. m. 
or 5:43 p. m. 

H. R. WARNER, Manager 



PARAISO 

HOT SPRINGS 



Now's the Time to Visit 
California's Real Paradise 



Weather and scenery unsurpassed. Only 4 hours 
from San Francisco. Wonderful natural hot soda 
and sulphur; guaranteed for rheumatism, liver, kid- 
ney and all stomach troubles. New garage. Expert 
masseurs. Rates $ 1 2 to $16, including baths. 

Round trip $6.35, including auto. Roads perfect, 
autos already running daily. 

Leave Third and Townsend 8:05 A. M. First and 
Broadway, Oakland, 7:17 A. M. 

Booklets Peck-Judah; Bryan's 149 Montgomery Street or 



H. H. McGOWAN, Proprietor and Manager 

MONTEREY COUNTY 



The ANCHORAGE 

The Most Beautiful Spot in the Santa Cruz Mountains, 
for health and pleasure. First-class table, cottages, tents, tennis, 
croquet, dancing, fishing, swimming, etc.; 50 acres redwood, pine 
and madrone; altitude 1900 feet; rates $9 and $11. Meets trains by 
appointment at Alma Station, S. P.; round trip from San Francisco, 
$2.50. Address 

CLAUDE C. MOORE, Patchln, Santa Clara Co. 
Tel. Alma 57. 



BEACH HILL INN 



SANTA CRUZ. 



NOW OPEN. 



Popular family resort overlooking beach. Address: 

MISS A. PORTER, Santa Cruz, Cal. Phone Santa Cruz 238. 



HOWARD SPRINGS 

LAKE COUNTY. 42 MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Lithla for kidneys; hot iron bath, 110 degrees, for rheumatism. The 
waters of the Hot Magnesia Spring have a wonderful record in the 
cure of stomach trouble. $12 to $18 per week. J. W. LAYMANCE, 
Prop., Howard Springs, Lake County. 



TENTS and FLAGS 

Why not buy your FLAGS from people who mike them and save the Middle Mao's 

profit. We have a large stock of FLAGS to select from and are convinced that our 

prices are the lowest. 

WEEKS-HOWE-EMERSON COMPANY 
51 Market Street Sao Francisco, Cal. 



July 22, 1911. 



POPULAR HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS. 



39 




THE QUEEN OF LAKE COUNTY RESORTS 

Highland Springs 

OPEN THE YEAR ROUND.. New and strictly first-class man- 
agement. Information and booklets regarding Highland Springs 
may be obtained at the Peck-Judah Free Information Bureau, 789 
Market street. For particulars, address W. H. MARSHALL, 
Proprietor, Highland Springs, Lake County, Cal. 



TALLAC and 
BROCKWAY 

Lake Tahoe 

The scenic resorts that have made 
Lake Tahoe famous. Open June 1st, 
under same management as in past 
years. Fishing season opens June 
1st; June fishing always best. 



Talla 



LAWRENCE & COMSTOCK 
Cal. and Brockway, Cal. 



If you can't join u» as a regular guest 

come down and spend a week-end. 

You will enjoy a treat at 

THE PENINSULA 

San Mateo California 

"A Hotel in a Garden" 

Rates on application 
JAS. H. DOOLITTLE, Manager 



LAKE COUNTY AUTOMOBILE 
TRANSPORTATION GO. 

Passengers carried by AUTOMOBILE and STAGES from PIETA 
to HIGHLAND SPRINGS, LAKEPORT, RELSEYVILLE. SODA 
BAY. BARTLETT SPRINGS and UPPER LAKE. Fine mountain 
road. Time for lunch at Pieta. Charges on automobiles extra in 
addition to regular one-way stage fare to Highland Springs. $1.50; 
Lakeport. |S; Kelaeyvllle, ?2. Tickets on sale at office Northwest- 
ern Pacific R. R. Co.. Ferry Bldg.. San Francisco, or 874 Market St, 
or address this office at Lakeport, Cal. 



Hummer's Solid Comfort Couch Hammock 

THE CLIMAX OF REPOSE— A PARAGON OF LUXURY.— Perfect 

and substantial in construction. For practicability, durability and 
beauty it is the peer of all similar devices. Call or write for prices. 




LE nr TENTS, CAMP FURNITURE, ETC. 

WEST OF THE ROCKIES 

W. A. Plummer Manufacturing Co. 

PINE AND FRONT STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO 
Home C 1971 Kearny 5560 Send for Illustrated Catalogue 



Hotel del Coronado 

CORONADO BEACH 

CALIFORNIA 



Motto: "BEST OF EVERYTHING" 
Most Delightful CUmate on Earth 



AMERICAN PLAN 

Summer Rates— $3.50 per day and upward 



Power boats from the hotel meet passengers from the north on 
the arrival of the Pacific Coast S. S. Company steamers. Golf, 
Tennis, Polo and other outdoor sports every day In the year. New 
700-foot ocean pier, for fishing. Boating and bathing are the very 
best. Send for booklet to MORGAN ROSS. Manager, Coronado 
Beach, Cal., or see H. F. NORCROSS. Agent, 334 So. Spring at, 
Los Angeles. Tel. A 6789; Main 3917. 



Hotel BEN LOMOND 

AND COTTAGES 

At Ben Lomond. Santa Cruz County. Cal. Beautifully located 
on the San Lorenzo river; finest of trout fishing, boating, etc.; only 
9 miles from beach, Santa Cruz. First-class accommodations, elec- 
tric-lighted rooms, buths attached. Terms. $2.50 per day. $14 
to $16 per week. Special rates to families. Fares — Sunday, round 
trip. $2.50; Saturday to Monday, $3; good to October 31, $3.50. For 
further particulars send for booklet or apply Peck-Judah Co., 789 
Market street, San Francisco. Take train 8:10 a. m., 3:15 p. m.. 
3d and Townsend streets; 8:27 a. m.. 2:27 p. m.. Oakland pier. 

CHATFTELD * KASPAREX. Props. 



40 



POPULAR HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS. 



July 22, 1911. 



A DEAD ROSE. 

O Rose! who dares to name thee? 

No longer roseate now, nor soft, nor sweet ; 

But barren, and hard, and dry as stubble-wheat, 
Kept seven years in a drawer — thy titles shame thee. 

The breeze that used to blow thee 

Between the hedge-row thorns, and take away 

An odor up the lane, to last all day — 
If breathing now — unsweetened would forego thee. 

The sun that used to smite thee, 

And mixed his glory in thy gorgeous urn, 

Till beam appeared to bloom and flower to burn — 

If shining now — with not a hue would light thee. 

The dew that used to wet thee, 

And, white first, grew incarnadined, because 
It ky upon thee where the crimson was — 

If dropping now — would darken where it met thee. 

The fly that lit upon thee, 

To stretch the tendrils of its tiny feet 
Along the leaf's pure edges after heat — 

If lighting now — would coldly overrun thee. 

The bee that once did suck thee, 

And build thy perfumed ambers up his hive, 
And swoon in thee for joy, till scarce alive — 

If passing now — would blindly overlook thee. 

The heart that doth recognize thee, 

Alone, alone ! The heart doth smell thee sweet, 
Doth view thee fair, both judge thee most complete — 

Though seeing now those changes that disguise thee. 

Yes, and the heart doth owe thee 

More love, dead rose ! than to such roses bold 
As Julia wears at dances, smiling cold ! 

Lie still upon this heart, which breaks below thee! 

— Elizabeth Barrett Browning. 



Dr. Agnew, rectal diseases exclusively. 

Francisco. 



821 Market street, San 




The favorite resort for 
tourists, sight seers, 
health and pleasure- 
seekers. A greater 
variety of mineral 
waters than In any 
other place In Amer- 
ica. The only natural 
mineral, steam and 
hammam bath, having 
great curative quali- 
ties. We positively 
cure rheumatism and 
stomach trouble. The 
hotel and bath houses have been thoroughly renovated and put in 
excellent shape for this season. Our table will be supplied with the 
best the market affords. The road from Cloverdale has been 
widened and put In splendid order for staging and automobiles. All 
kinds of amusements, including dancing, every evening. Round- 
trip ticket good for six months via Cloverdale, $8. Good hunting 
and fishing. Rates, $2.60 to $3 per day. $14 to $16 per week. Child- 
ren from $7 to $9 per week. Special rates for families and long- 
termers. For further information, call on Peck-Judah Information 
Bureau, 789 Market street, or address FL H. CURRY, Proprietor, 
The Geysers, Cal. 



SEIGLER 



HOT SPRINGS, Lake County. Natural hot baths for rheumatism, 
stomach trouble, malaria, etc. Swimming pond, baths free. $10 to 
$14 a week. Automobile livery. MISS M. SPAULDING, Seigler. 
Lake County, Cal. Information PECK-JUDAH CO., 789 Market 
street, San Francisco. 



HOTEL BON AIR 



SPECIAL SATURDAY NIGHT DINNER 



6 TO 8 O'CLOCK 



Ready for quests under new management. 
Fifty minutes from San Francisco. 



M. A. SMYTH E, Lessee and Manager. 
Larkspur P. 0., ESCALLE, Marin County Phone: San Rafael 2431 



HARBIN SPRINGS 



NEW MANAGEMENT; NEWLY" FURNISHED THROUGHOUT; 
NEW SERVICE; EXCELLENT TABLE. Our own garden, orchard 
and dairy. Famous hot and cold curative mineral waters free to 
guests. Masseur, Roger Cornell. Trout fishing; deer hunting; gym- 
nasium, livery, drives, trails, automobile trips, hotel, cottages, tents. 
Room, board and baths, $12 per week and up. Inquire at S. P. Of- 
fices; Examiner, 74 Geary St.; Peck-Judah*s, 789 Market street; or 
BOOTH, CARR & BOOTH, Proprietors, Harbin Springs, Lake Co. 




Hotel 
Belleclaire 



BROADWAY 
at 77th ST. 



SUBWAY 
79th Street 



-'jH&jjy* 



fr— New York City 



HEADQUARTERS FOR CALIFORNIANS 

Thoroughly Modern and Fireproof 
FAMILY— TRANSIENT HOTEL 

Rates: with bath $2.SO per day up 

ELMER F. WOODBURY, Prop. 
Formerly of the Maryland, Pasadena Hotel St. Mark, Oakland 



Hotel Westminster 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. Fourth and Main Sts. 

American Plan Reopened. 

Rates per day, $2.50, rooms without bath 
Rooms with bath, $3, $3. SO and $4. 

European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up. 
With bath $1.50 and up. 

F. O. JOHNSON. Proprietor 



Hotel Sacramento 

SACRAMENTO, CALA 

Elesrant new fire-proof construction. Service as perfedl as 
expert management can produce. 

ALBERT BETTENS. Proprietor. 



HOTEL de REDWOOD 

IN THE HEART OF THE REDWOODS TWO 
AND ONE-HALF MILES FROM LAUREL 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS 



P. 0. Address WRIGHTS, R. F. D., CAL. 
J. E. SER0Y, Lessee and Manager 



Telephone $8 to $12 per week 

Meet parlies It train oa notification 




*aUMV»~l My MM) 



FRANCJ8 Co 




XE2R 



Davotad to tha Leading lnt«ra»u of California and tha Pacific Coaat. 




VOL. LXXXII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 29, 1911 



Ni. 4 



Th« SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER ia printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where Information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 

London Office — 30 Cornhlll, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements, or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 

There's a darn sight more than the fair site in this ex- 
position business. 

You can't tell an English political peer from an English 

hooligan by the way he acts. 

The open town means the closed, barred and bolted door 

for the citizen who lives in a house worth robbing. 

Wizard Burbank has achieved a new cherry of such size 

and flavor that one of them will do for a round of cocktails. 

A local laughsmith works in the word "very" whenever 

he can. The only discernible reason is that he is paid by the 
word. 

One exhibit that we won't have on hand for exposition 



visitors is a police force run openly for purposes of politics 
and revenue only. 

And they did not put it in the park or at Harbor View or 

Merced, but all over the city map — praise be to their wisdom 
and long-headedness! 

If anybody thinks he has a kick coming on the fair site 

decision, let him have his kick — let him have it where he will 
feel it most and longest. 

The dollar-a-day basket picnicker is not welcome at 

Santa Barbara. Don't bring your own luncheon, but kindly re- 
member your check book. 

It needs only an iron fence to make the British House 

of Commons a real bear pit, worthy of addition to the show 
places of the insular metropolis. 

■ — —If the open town is good for the municipality, why 
wouldn't the open shop be a good thing for the municipality's 
industrial interests? Think it over. 

A man in Paris is reported to have played the piano 

without missing a note for thirty consecutive hours. Hurry up 
and put a new blade in the guillotine. 

Now the full-bellied trust magnates may put aside those 

agricultural whiskers and quit trying to act like poor American 
farmers in deadly fear of reciprocity. 

When he has come to be so much of an "ex" that he 

can't lick anything of his own sex, the retired prizefighter can 
at least lam the daylights out of his spouse. "Spider" Kelly 
qualifies for the local championship as a wife-beater. 

Abe Ruef in stripes has the sympathy and good wishes 

and occasional companionship of an editor whose one best 
boast is that he was chiefly instrumental in providing the 
stripes. Ruef should be careful about his associations, now 
that he is a prisoner. 



Now the fair having been put somewhere, let San Fran- 
cisco put her hand to the hammer — for building purposes — and 
into her pocket — for investment purposes. 

Princess Chimay, having given up portions of her De- 
troit fortune to three husbands, is about to try another. She 
seems like a sort of female Nat Goodwin. 

Give him the axe, the axe, the axe! Who? Why, the 

man who tries in any way to block the driving ahead of the 
exposition on the site chosen by the directors. 

The sky-high price of California hops does not indicate 

that the world is figuring on getting along with what fits the 
inside of a stein — not for a little while, at least. 

Secretary Wickersham, balancing himself on the edge of 

the toboggan slide, shouts that Delegate Wickersham is a liar. 
That's what Ballinger said, likewise Dickinson. 

Uncle Sam and Miss Canada have at length put a turn- 
stile in the tariff fence. On both sides of the line the further 
progress of events will be watched with kindly interest. 

When the sweltering, stifling East reads that the mercury 

in Death Valley has been bumping the 140 degree mark it must 
feel like shutting off the fan and ringing for more blankets. 

The vote on the fair site was unanimous. So is the 

vote of thanks to the fair directors. At least, they may be sure 
that any dissenting voice is not that of a man fit to be a San 
Franciscan. 

"Doc" Arnold, the Chicago specialist in diseases of 

street railroads, sticks to his price of $250 a day plus expenses 
for a visit to the San Francisco system. Arnold is working for 
other reasons besides his health. 

Nothing at all ails Caruso's voice. He confesses that 

his throat trouble was invented by a press agent for the pur- 
poses of publicity. When a singer gets that far along, his notes 
are beginning to turn from gold to silver. 

Five thousand begging letter writers asked Mrs. Harri- 

man for $110,000,000— an average of $22,000 per beggar. Ap- 
parently there are a lot of people who believe that when you're 
asking you might as w^ll ask for all you want. 

The age of meekness passes. It is telegraphed from 

Colorado that a hunter there was severely bitten by a wounded 
jack-rabbit, which pain had made ferocious. Let the worm 
turn, the sheep run amuck and the dove go a-preying. 

Dalton, a public servant caught in the act of plundering 

and betraying his employer, will have eight years in San Quen- 
tin in which to reflect on the old saw about honesty and policy. 
If he had not lied so shamelessly to court and jury, he might 
have got off a few years easier. 

You will have noticed, of course, that the white slavers 

are among the first to signalize the lifting of the lid by exten- 
sion of their business. Bassity, the Mayor's bosom friend, may 
not be a white slaver, but certain of his industries consume the 
goods furnished by the slavers. 




. i . ib m. 1 "-.. i j i i. . ' ' ■ ' ' " ■ " ■ ■ — ■«■ ■■ .u..,";.).;,. ' .... 




Sana lFirfflimdke@~-Tfti© ExgxssiKfeKi Ofty=~ H 9 D 5 

With the selection of the exposition site, that great project — great enough to tax San Francisco's creative and construc- 
tive force to the utmost in the next four years — begins to take on some definiteness of form. It begins to pass out of the mere 
paper stage and into the era 'of flying dirt and rising steel, stone and concrete. Soon we shall be able to speak of it not as a 
project, but as a fact on the highway to accomplishment. 

The directors of the exposition company are to be thanked and congratulated upon their decision, and especially is pub- 
lic gratitude due to the special committee consisting of I. W. Hellman, Jr., John Barneson and Andrew M. Davis. But for that 
committee and its good sense and tact, the deadlock between the embittered and embattled partisans of the Park and Harbor 
View might have lasted much longer and might have been broken only to open the door for a still more bitter political 
fight. 

It is certain that if Harbor View had been chosen by the requisite majority of sixteen, Mayor McCarthy, backed by the 
Park site people, would have refused to allow the necessary North Beach streets to be closed, using for that purpose his under- 
lings in the Board of Supervisors. Thus McCarthy would have made it a political issue and one from which he might have 
drawn support otherwise unreachable. As the case stands, McCarthy, having voted for the compromise site, combining the 
two parks and Harbor View, cannot safely or profitably put any obstacles in the way of making the Harbor View lands avail- 
able. He was deprived of that issue when the compromise report found its way to speedy and unopposed adoption. 

But the best aspect of the site situation is that which shows how much present and prospective good to the fair and the 
city is to be obtained at the minimum of cost. As the special committee's report pointed out, the combined sites are the most 
accessible ground on the peninsula, not only to residents of all parts of the city, but to visitors from our neighbor communities 
and from abroad; they will give us the largest possible benefits in the way of permanent buildings, which, after the exposition, 
will be the city's property if they are on the city's ground; their use will result in the building up of the city generally, rather 
than of one section. 

Besides, the compromise looks to the erection at or near the junction of Van Ness and Market streets of a great con- 
vention hall and theatre, which will be used for the housing of exposition conventions and gatherings while the fair is in pro- 
gress, and after that will belong to the city. It is probable that this convention hall will be rushed to completion ahead of the 
fair itself. The action of the special committee named to look after this feature — the same committee, by the way, that 
broke the deadlock and gave us the combined sites — indicates a purpose to get the land at once and go on with the building 
immediately. Thus we may be able to take care of the conventions that will come here during the pre-exposition period 
without bonding the city or letting the auditorium go into private hands and permanently remain there. 

. Again, the compromise provides for the building of a system of boulevards that will be a splendid municipal asset for- 
ever. These boulevards will encircle the northerly end of the peninsula from Telegraph Hill to Harbor View, through the Pre- 
sidio and across to Lincoln Park, and thence to Golden Gate Park, and thence down through the heart of the town to the con- 
vention hall at the so-called civic center. The last stretch of boulevard will come somewhere near realization of the old dream 
about a Park panhandle extension, an idea that was killed off by contemplation of the great cost. It will be a long step toward 
the City Beautiful when its beauties are made accessible by the right kind of roads. 

Under the plan of the directors, there will be a new factor of intra mural transportation, and not merely an enlargement of 
the existing routes and systems. High efficiency lines will run over low grades from the ferry to Harbor View, and thence 
to Lincoln and Golden Gate Parks. After the fair is over, these new lines will be ready for the permanent use of the city in- 
sofar as they are needed. Grades, rails and motive power will be available to haul people into sections now sparsely inhab- 
ited that will be crowded by 1915. Doubtless, also, the Stockton street tunnel will be a necessary adjunct to the fair, and will 
be pressed to completion even before the exposition is anywhere near ready. 

It must be gratifying to the directors to observe how generally their judgment is endorsed and how enthusiastically. They 
have spent a long time over the site question, but it is apparent now that they spent their time well. At all events, they have 
worked out the problems of location with eminent satisfaction to the people, and particularly to the business interests which 
naturally and properly want the exposition features that attract the largest crowds situated as close as possible to the down- 
town shopping centers. 

All in all, the decision of the directors must have the practically unanimous approval of the city. It favors nobody, dis- 
criminates against nobody. It will surely contribute much to the success of the undertaking, and will leave us the largest pos- 
sible legacy of post-exposition benefits. 

It will be surprising if the settlement of the site question does not mark the beginning of the real exposition activity and 
prosperity. A great deal of money is known to have been waiting for months upon this decision. Now it will seek action in 
the host of independent enterprises that always cluster around a world's fair. Much more money will hurry hither for like 
purposes. Soon the actual preliminary work of construction must be under way, and that will send a stream of coin out as 
wages, and through the wage earners into the channels of trade. It will be a lively and prosperous fall and winter for San 
Francisco, with the sure promise of better and better times for the next five years. 

These conditions call for the completest harmony among San Franciscans, the securest industrial peace and the highest 
quality of efficiency in our government. We shall do badly if we let the business or political interests of any man or clique or 
faction interfere with our gigantic task. It is a task that requires the best we have and are— a time that calls upon us to put 
our best foot forward and keep it there. 






July 29, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



As a matter of course, the weights 
Some Facts About and measures ordinance is not going 

Weights and Measures, easily through the Board of Super- 
visors. There is the kind of fight 
against it that was fully expected, the same kind of fight that 
similar measures have encountered in other cities. And when 
the law is passed and enforced — conditions that depend almost 
altogether upon the rock-bottom honesty and the energy of the 
Supervisors, the Mayor and the courts — it will be found where 
that fight came from and why. 

In other American cities that have taken up this matter in 
earnest, the deputies have turned up evidence of wholesale 
swindling in which manufacturers are partners — crooked scales, 
fraudulent and "fixed" measures and short-weight packages 
affecting nearly every article of public consumption. Chiefly, 
these frauds are practiced in foodstuffs. They are a mean and 
highly profitable form of swindling, and it is to be expected 
that those who make "good money" by the swindles will resist 
to the last ditch any attempt to protect the victims. 

In San Francisco, as elsewhere, it will be found that dishon- 
esty and not honesty of weights, measures and packages is the 
rule. Few consumers get from few dealers a full pound of 
butter, a full quart of milk or a full weight or measure of any- 
thing else. And, as usual, the drain is chiefly from those least 
able to stand it, It is upon the poor that the cheaters generally 
thrive. The smaller a man's means the less he gets for what he 
has to give. The short-weight men provide practical exempli- 
fication of the cryptic scriptural statement that "from him that 
hath not even that which he hath shall be taken away." 

The fight against the new law is financed and generalled by 
the big dealers and manufacturers working through the little 
retailers, though these latter are themselves much concerned to 
keep anybody from testing their scales and measures. The re- 
tailer is bad off who cannot establish a working connection with 
some supervisor. That is the way of municipal politics. There 
is nothing so bad that it can't get an advocate before the super- 
visors if it knows where there is a bunch of votes staked out. 

3S- 
Queer things keep outcropping in 
the water muddle wherein some- 
body uses the municipal livery to 
serve the water monopoly devil. 
This week there is another call upon the supervisors for $15,- 
000 to pay for the preparing and presenting of the Hetch- 
Hetchy case to the Government investigators. This time the 
money is to be delivered to the City Attorney to be expended 
for the identical work that the City Engineer has already been 
paid for doing. 

It may be that this is intended as a fat fee for friends and 
associates, but the pretense is that the money will go for the 
collection and collation of data as to the Tuolumne project, to 
which the City Engineer's office is so singularly committed. 

The truth is, that San Francisco has spent a great deal of 
public money finding out all that can be found out about the 
Hetch-Hetchy source. If all this money has not bought the 
completest possible knowledge of that source, then somebody 
has been cheating the public. The City Engineer's office should 
be able to turn out on short notice and without hiring an extra 
clerk, exhaustive information on any feature of this precious 
and seemingly priceless project. That any one should come 
now begging another appropriation may not be surprising, but 
it is, to say the least, suspicious. 

The Merchants' Association of San Francisco is doing good 
work in investigating the expenditure of moneys on public 
buildings; they have men employed to watch the contractor and 
day laborer — all of which is very good — but why not investigate 
and protect trie great bond issue which the people voted for 



More Money for 
Investigations. 



WATER, and which is being voted away for the Devil only 
knows WHAT. 

It is claimed that this information is to be collected for the 
U. S. Army Engineers. If this is necessary, then somebody 
must have been incompetent or dishonest in compiling previous 
reports. The Army Engineers have been over the ground and 
know from personal investigations the exact conditions of the 
Hetch-Hetchy situation. Further prodding of "facts" and post- 
age stamp "data" will have no effect on them — they are men 
far above such methods. 

Judging from the interior press, it seems that the City Engi- 
neer's method of getting information about water sources and 
conditions in other available sources that are offered to San 
Francisco, is to write a letter to somebody who may have offi- 
cial or personal knowledge, and ask for data without suggestion 
of remuneration. Specifically this is the fact with inquiries 
lately made by or for Mr. Manson in Amador County. There is 
quite a lot of margin between $15,000 and a two-cent postage 
stamp. The tax-paying public ought to be able to draw its own 
inferences from these statements. 

At the same meeting of the Board of Supervisors which heard 
the requisition for another filling of the bottomless Hetch- 
Hetchy expense bucket it was announced that there had been 
no settlement of the adverse claims against Ham Hall's Cherry 
Creek proposition without which the astute Mr. Manson is un- 
able to advance the Hetch-Hetchy project another step. 

JBT 

Until the State completely controls 
School Book Question, the school text book business, there 
will be a cunning and rapacious trust 
operating in that field with great gain for its members and cor- 
responding loss to the parents who must buy books and appara- 
tus if their children are to learn. As long as any part of the 
child's school equipment must be bought of private individuals 
or concerns, that long will there be graft upon and around the 
public schools. 

One of the methods of the book and equipment trusts is to 
effect frequent changes, so that the books used by a pupil may 
not be sold second-hand when he has finished with them or 
passed along to younger members of the same household. What 
is required this term is barred next term. For this purpose the 
school book ring maintains a vast private force of sleek and 
adroit solicitors to do business with boards of education, trus- 
tees and principals. 

That the State can print and provide school books of any 
kind at cost has been fully demonstrated. There is no good rea- 
son — no honest reason — why this should not be done, and done 
quickly. That would shut off the book ring's graft forever. But 
why not go a logical step further and provide school books 
free? 

The public pays the teacher and builds and maintains the 
school house. It does not ask the pupil or the pupil's parents 
to help in those items. Our boast is that in America education 
is free. Is it? The housing is free and the teaching, but the 
books are not. Without books there cannot be much education. 

The State can afford to make the books used in all the public 
schools, and all the apparatus and accessories, made by the 
State without profit to anybody, could be held as the property of 
the State, being merely lent to the pupil. A book thus lent 
could be receipted for, and when its user has done with it, re- 
turned. If it were lost or destroyed, or so defaced as to make 
it unsalable, then the pupil should be compelled to pay back its 
cost price. 

Here is a suggestion offered in the highest patriotic sense. 
Until it or something like it comes to pass let us not say any 
more that the education of our public schools is free. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 



The Canadian reciprocity agree- 
Reciprocity Bill Passes, ment having received the sanction 

of the Congress of the United 
States, and presumably the approval of a very large majority 
of the people of the nation, now only awaits the signatures of 
the official Governments of the two nations, parties to the com- 
pact. So far as this nation is concerned, it will now move for- 
ward in the channels of international commerce and commodity 
interchange upon the basis of new fundamentals of the func- 
tions of the customs house collecting taxes from foreign-made 
goods and wares that come to our markets for our consumption. 
The treaty with Canada provides for neither free trade nor 
high tariff duties. It provides for the kind of fair trade that 
reputable merchants require in business transactions with other 
merchants, and which they accord to all the commercial world. 
To be sure, Canada expects the operation of the pact to greatly 
benefit herself as an independent nation, and her people in- 
dividually and collectively. The nation and people of the 
United States expect corresponding benefits to accrue to them, 
therefore the pact is a wise economic, civic, political and 
humanitarian force that hedges about two Ar.glo-Saxon families 
with a concrete wali of mutual helpfulness and interdependence. 
Only good could possibly come from such international comity 
and recognition of the ties of racial consanguinity. 

But greater blessings will come to the people of the United 
States than could possibly be conferred by the operation of the 
Canadian treaty, because other and far greater nations than 
Canada, commercially and industrially speaking, will ask to 
be established on the same commercial footing with our coun- 
try that is enjoyed by Canada. 

While the Canadian pact was still pending in the Senate, the 
semi-official press of Germany, France, Italy, Holland and 
Japan demanded of their Governments to see to it that the 
United States granted no commercial advantage to Canada with- 
out according them corresponding benefits, and the German 
newspapers became almost threatening. It was at this stage 
of the negotiations, or rather during the earlier days in the at- 
tempt to defeat the bill, that Secretary of State Knox went out 
of his way to say that should the act pass Congress, it would be 
an invitation to all nations to request similar advantages for 
themselves, but that he should turn down and refuse to con- 
sider all such applications. It goes without saying that Secre- 
tary Knox is a high protectionist, and that he used the influence 
of his great office to persuade Senators and Congressmen to 
repudiate all bills looking to legalizing a reciprocity treaty with 
Canada. 

3B- 

Now that the Representatives and 
Need of an Explanation. Senators in Congress have finished 

their labors on the Canadian reci- 
procity bill, the public would be pleased if they would make an 
effort to turn their attention to another great public question and 
explain what they have done, or left undone, that causes the 
trade exhibit of Brazil to show a balance against the United 
States of $100,000,000 during 1910, and favoring England dur- 
ing the same period by $3,000,000. Of course, it is all because 
the United States has no merchant marine. During 1910 only 
two steam vessels flying the American flag entered the ports of 
Brazil, and they were yachts of American millionaires on pleas- 
ure bent. Of the steamships, merchantmen, that entered Bra- 
zilian ports in 1910, 2131 were English, German 910, French 
395, Argentina 341, Italy 315, Holland 135, Cuba 8, against 
3 American pleasure yachts. During the same year the statis- 
tics show the entrance of sailing ships into Brazilian ports : 120 
were English, 85 from Norway, 34 from Argentina, 35 from Ger- 
many, 32 from Denmark. Warships and yachts are the only 
vessels carrying the Stars and Stripes that do honor to Brazil's 



harbors. Last year Brazil sold products amounting to $123,- 
000,000 to the United States and bought $23,000,000 worth of 
our goods, the balance against us being $100,000,000 in Ameri- 
can cash, which Brazil turned over to England, France and Ger- 
many for their makes of goods and wares, and all this because 
American manufacturers have no merchant marine, conse- 
quently no commercial agents in Brazil. Moreover, our $123,- 
000,000 worth of products we bought of Brazil, and the $23,- 
000,000 worth of goods and wares we sold to Brazil last year 
were transported in ships sailing under flags other than the 
American colors. Instead of making clap-trap speeches to 
mislead the people, United States Senators would do well if 
they devoted their idle time in formulating legislation to 
change our trade relations with Brazil, and all the other South 
American republics. 

W 
W. P. Lawlor, who holds what 
Lawlor's Prosecution, should be the respected position of 
judge in the Superior Court of this 
State, continues to prosecute, with all the vigor of a paid attor- 
ney, certain of those haled before him, with what is manifestly 
personal malignity. 

For more than five hundred days, the trumped-up charges of 
bribery brought by personal enemies against Patrick Calhoun, 
Tirey L. Ford, William Abbott and Thornwell Mullally have 
lingered in Lawlor's court. Regularly, whenever these cases 
have been called on the calendar, counsel for the accused men 
have asked for immediate trial, which has been as regularly 
refused. A further continuance was ordered a few days ago 
until August 3d. 

Such action by a court is absolutely shameful. It is contrary 
to all our American notions of justice. Judge Lawlor should 
know, and probably does know, quite well that convictions can 
never be secured in these cases, yet he petulantly persists in 
subjecting the defendants to great expense and the stigma of an 
accusation that no jury will support. 

Lawlor's preposterous conduct in thefee cases is not only a 
gross violation of a citizen's right, guaranteed by the Constitu- 
tion, to a speedy trial, but a travesty upon our court procedure, 
which it brings into disrepute and ridicule. 

It is to be hoped that the Appellate Court will quickly put 
a stop to Lawlor's outrageous persecution. 

W 

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Mrs. Woolsey — and if you don't know that authority, it 

is because you are a male degenerate — says that man is elimin- 
ating himself. It is nature's law — the survival of the fittest. 
She also remarks that the male was an afterthought of nature, 
anyway; he was at first, and is still throughout many orders of 
being, solely useful in propagation of the race. Women are the 
species; men are only incidents. And the worst is to come. 
Mrs. Woolsey proves that women are growing larger and 
stronger physically. Personally, I believe there to be no occa- 
sion for immediate alarm, but the "incidents" who endeavor to 
pay their alimony by applying themselves to sedentary pursuits 
in preference to building up bone and muscle by engaging in 
more active employment are certainly taking some chances. 

The attempt of a visiting labor delegate to unionize the 

postal employees has come to naught. The post-office clerks 
and mail-carriers of this country are a conservative and intelli- 
gent class of men, very much given to doing their own think- 
ing. They are on the direct path to advancement. Combination 
among themselves for legitimate purposes is appreciated and 
encouraged, and mutual benefit has resulted from such asso- 
ciation. To encourage a feeling of distrust and dissatisfaction 
between Government employees and the interests they serve is 
to adopt the methods of the demagogue, and so, by the large 
majority, ail such attempts will be regarded. To the unthink- 
ing minority, a word of warning should suffice : When the ass 
bends his ear to the counsel of the fox, it is bad for the ass. 

At the risk of being considered radical in our views, 

we recommend that every electric wire for light or power, in 
other than a fire-proof building, shall be absolutely exposed to 
view on china supports, or, if carried outside of walls or under 
floors, every wire shall be inside of gas pipes or some such pipe 
device. Electric wires carry a fluid which is under tension and 
ever ready to break bonds. If it does, there is, inevitably, a 
fire. The electric current is, in some ways, more dangerous 
than gas. It is without the vile smell of gas to give notice of 
its presence. It works more slowly but just as surely. Fiat lux 
we stand by, but as better a live dog than a dead lion, so better 
a tallow dip in safety than a palace of light in flames. 

An attorney of Los Angeles has brought suit against the 

Los Angeles R. R. Company on account of injuries sustained 
by him in a collision. He claims damages as follows: Because 
he is not as good an attorney as he was before the accident, 
$10,000; because of impairment of his ability as a stenogra- 
pher, $5,000; because of the loss of his capacity to perform on 
the violin, $5,000; because he can no longer sing, as was afore- 
time his wont, $5,000; for medical attention, etc., $30,598.10. 
Whatever the gentleman's present opinion be of his capabili- 
ties, it is quite evident that his ability to recall their former 
value has been little impaired as the result of his injuries. 



-One of the delegates to the recent teachers' convention 



at San Francisco, realizing the necessity of acquiring at least 
a superficial acquaintance with the devilish things of lire in 
order that intelligent comparison might be made with the holi- 
ness of his own undertaking, has evidently taken a few first 
lessons in poker, for in the course of an instructive discourse 
he told his auditors that "four of a kind constitute a royal 
flush." While the gentleman's progress in iniquity may be con- 
sidered to have been admirable, he should be advised not to put 
his newly-acquired knowledge into active operation until he 
shall have delved a little deeper into the mysteries of this fas- 
cinating but ungodly game. Smarter men than he have played 
four of a kind for a royal flush, only to discover their error 
when too late. 

1 am glad that the head of our municipal Government 

has at last declared himself, unmistakably. His former an- 
nouncements have, I grieve to say, savored, just a shade, of in- 
consistency, if not, indeed, of hypocrisy. Hypocrisy and in- 
sincerity I do dislike most heartily. And for my lack of ab- 
solute faith he is not blameless. Were the Devil to make known 
his conversion to Christianity as the consequence of an awaken- 
ing by conscience to the evil and heinousness of sin, the an- 
nouncement would be little convincing to those aware of his un- 
interrupted proprietary interest in Hades; but, permit me to 
say that in this there is no veiled insult to his Satanic Majesty, 
for I don't believe the Devil to be capable of any such unwor- 
thy subterfuge. 

The man who quits after winning half the battle is both 

cowardly and foolish. There is a lot of hard work in this life, 
but if we manfully perform our share, digging in while the 
other fellow loafs, success must, necessarily, result. The above 
information comes to us in the form of a poem, covering three 
closely type-written pages, and signed "Flavious;" but as our 
space is limited, we have taken the liberty of somewhat con- 
densing its beauties, abstracting the kernel, as it were, and leav- 
ing the charming, shell-like decorations to the imaginations of 
our intelligent and more poetically inclined readers. I hope 
to hear from "Flavious" again. What he says is true; very 
true indeed. 

1 cull the following from a local contemporary: "Good 

men do not need to be complimented. The newspaper which 
makes a practice ot writing up good men will do the same for 
weak men — if paid for it." This is not only the veriest tommy- 
rot, but libelously untrue, an insult to honestly conducted jour- 
nals, and a free editorial notice of the writer's littleness of soul 
and paucity of good feeling. When a man is so devilish mean, 
himself, that he conceives it impossible of another to delight in 
saying kindly ard complimentary things without tagging them 
with a price, he is an object of pity and commiseration. 



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Richard Tobin, the pride of San Mateo, has become also its 
chief envy. At his place in El Cerrito, Tobin has as his guests 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Miller and Chauncey Olcott, Irish, and 
with the exception of Hackett, the greatest stage lover of them 
all. If Hackett were not Irish, too, Chauncey would be even 
greater than he. Tobin is somewhat of a famous person him- 
self, being one of the greatest poloists ever beaten by England. 
There is one good thing about polo, however: you can always 
blame it or the pony. At any rate, the ride from Ghent to Aix 
would have been nothing to Richard; nor, for the matter of that, 
to his guests, either. Several times, led by Tobin, they have 
done the trip from Burlingame to the Cliff House without ap- 
pearing to suffer the slightest discomfort. On the other hand, 
the exercise is having a most agreeable effect on Olcott, who, 
it is admitted even by his greatest admirers, has grown a little 
too rotund for ideal love. Chauncey seems to understand this 
very well himself, for, according to his host, he rides like the 
devil. It was in compliment to his equestrianship that Tobin 
remarked the first day he rode with him : 

"Chauncey. you have the finest seat for an actor I ever saw." 

"Oh, I have a better one than that," returned Olcott. 

"I don't see how." 

"Devouring Irish stew," supplied the actor. "Wait till we 
get to the Cliff House." 

S 'S S 

During the recent serious illness of Joaquin Miller, orders 
were given by the doctor that none should talk to the patient. 
But occasionally some one more bold than the rest would come, 
and, standing in the doorway of the chamber, gaze long with 
solemn, lack-lustre eye on the face of the stricken man. And 
meantime could be heard, "sweet and low," the continual buzz 
of conversation, discussing the chances of recovery, and the 
poet's fitness for the great change. One day, when all this was 
going on, a friend sat down by the bedside and the patient 
made a feeble motion as if trying to speak. The friend put his 
head down close to catch the last message. In a weak, hesi- 
tating whisper, Joaquin asked: "Who — who are all those damn 
fools in the next room ?" He got well. 
S o~ o- 

The Coast Artillery Corps, under the 
supervision of regular army officers, has 
succeeded in proving itself in face of a 
mock battle. After this we can go to bed 
in peace, sure that the country is safe, 
whether or not Hearst, as in the case with 
Spain, creates a Japanese war over some- 
thing that never happened. Besides, be- 
longing to the Coast Artillery are the 
Elevenths, known as the "Millionaire 
Militiamen!" The Elevenths have shown 
themselves courageous enough to eat beef 
and beans. Could anything further be 
expected of them. One or two of them, 
under discipline, even consented to chop 
wood — and there was no nigger in the 
pile either. Captain H. N. Royden is so 
proud of the troop, indeed, that the epau- 
lets on his shoulders stand out like veri- 
table chips for the knocking. Gerald 
Conens, quartermaster, wears a supremelj 



happy look. For garbed in their tailored uniforms, and each 
looking his pedigree, the company is one to be proud of. It 
would make a "hit" in society anywhere. And Gerald is not 
the least of them. To prove the real Eleventh-degree aristoc- 
racy of the troop, we would assert for the benefit of the wonder- 
ing and admiring public that one of the boys (it would be too 
hard on the others to say which) had never in his life seen 
beans. The shade of Beau Brummell grows envious at this, 
we know, but we positively cannot help it. Nor do we expect 
the great majority practically brought up on beans to believe 
the assertion. But it is true — at least it appeared so. Having 
been disciplined for some offense to do K. P. duty, which 
means kitchen police, this aristocrat of aristocrats was told by 
the company cook to soak a couple of pecks of beans in a large 
pot. Saluting nobly, the son of his father proceeded to obey 
orders. But when the cook looked into the pot, he found it 
filled with barley. What is the explanation? 
o' o- fl- 
it is related of "Grant" Carpenter that, at a Press Club gath- 
ering, upon being asked by a widow to guess her age, he made 
what to another might have been a fatal pause. "You must have 
some idea about it?" she said, with what was intended as an 
arch sidewise glance. "I have several ideas," admitted Grant, 
with a smile. "The only trouble is that I hesitate whether to 
make you ten years younger on account of your looks, or ten 
years older on account of your brains." Then, while the widow 
smiled and blushed, he took a graceful but speedy leave. 
V V V 
George X. Wendling, millionaire lumberman, and formerly 
a member of the State Legislature, has blossomed into poetry. 
On every hand his friends are congratulating him, wondering 
how it happened, and how long it will last. Up to the present, 
it amounts to six stanzas — of merit, necessarily. Not the spring, 
nor the summer, nor the swallows that make the summer, was 
the new poet's inspiration, but Mount Shasta, which has stood 
for other verse-makers in its time and is still standing. But 
the new poet, bursting on us much in the manner of a thunder- 
bolt, treats it differently — for instance, his peroration, "All of 
lovely Klamath Valley in that land beyond compare." Cer- 
tainly nothing finer than this has been done in the English Ian- 



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July 29, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



guage. It is not too much to say that in these verses Mount 
Shasta has been recreated. It can never now die. And the 
poem is having its effect elsewhere. Down in Carmel, it is 
said that George Sterling is positively sick at the shoulder- 
blades from trailing his wings at the reading. All that is left 
of "The Wine of Wizardry" is the title. But in spite of the 
congratulations of his friends, and the great stir which his 
verse has created, Wendling is bearing himself with great mod- 
esty. Even the statement of scientists at the Tamalpais Ob- 
servatory that Shasta, in consequence of the honor done it, has 
heightened several feet, does not move him to any show of 
vanity — which proves in him surely a capacity for yet greater 
poetry. May the gods be careful of him, as they doubtless 
will. At the club the other day, one of the clubman's friends, 
in referring to the subject, suggested : 

"What measure do you like best, Wendling. Ever try the 
baracolle ?" 

The poet smiled. "No, I prefer the stein." 
8 S o- 

Every now and then one of our charming ministers become 
denunciatory. Usually it happens in San Francisco, but this 
time it happened in Sacramento, with this city as the principal 
part of the subject. The Reverend S. Fraser Langford (a good 
fighting name, by the way) denounced on "Crawfish in Pants." 
Living in the Capital and catering regularly to an audience of 
politicians, the reverend gentleman should know, of course, the 
crawfish in all its different degrees and species. Other varieties 
of fish and deep-sea monsters he is evidently not so well ac- 
quainted with. But with regard to the crawfish, here is what 
he says: "There are thirty thousand human crawfish in Cali- 
fornia, and particularly in San Francisco — Christians who are 
going back on their religious exercises. These thirty thousand 
represent Eastern Christians who have failed to ally themselves 
with the local churches. Is it possible that you cannot trans- 
plant an Eastern oyster without him losing his flavor, or an 
Eastern Christian without him losing his religion? Etc., etc. 
To all of which one might answer by asking the question : What 
is a Christian? If represented in the narrow, sombre, New 
Englander of the cobwebbed, ritual-stuffed brain, of whom 
there are legions and each and every one a gossiper and a 
preyer on his neighbor, San Francisco, at least, cannot stand for 
him unchanged. He is too much like a Christmas toy wound 
up to quote the Ten Commandments, especially for the benefit 
of every one else. As for himself, he is not really good. The 
only reason he is good at home is that there are so many more 
of his swarm to watch him. But out here, and particularly in 
San Francisco, nobody gives a hang what he does. Conse- 
quently he settles down to something of happiness and freedom, 
and, perhaps, forgets tc go to church. Nor would it be well for 
him to do so — if he would keep him the caviler and mush-eater 
he was. What we want in this country are people who, if they 
have no religion, have none, and if they have religion have got 
it right. Considering some you meet, the best way to have re- 
ligion, it would appear, is often to have none at all. At any 
rate, we object to Dr. Langford using the word "crawfish" with 
regard to citizens of San Francisco. Those we have, we send 
to Sacramento sessionally. As for the Christians who come 
here from the East, and prefer to emancipate themselves, we 
believe in letting them rest in peace. Should they raise Hell we 
will put them in jail. The pity is that Dr. Langford, having a 
diploma for raising the same, it is impossible to touch him. 
5 » o- 
Clarence Walker, the young aviator, and his bride, the for- 
mer Miss Caroline Biven, have returned. It wasn't that the 
honeymoon tour around the globe was over, by any means, 
but that the young man's mother had stopped his allowance. 
The fate of youthful couples is sad. Now it is up to this Bene- 



dict, who has so long sought the heavens, to get down to earth 
and get a job, or be forgiven. The merest sort of an adventurer 
can make good in amateur flying, but it takes a steadier nerve 
to make good when the rent man comes around. 

With regard to Kenneth McAlpine and his bride, who was 
Miss Florence Alma Smith, daughter of millionaire James B. 
Smith, it is different. After having been ruthlessly separated 
from his young bride by her father, who would not stand for 
it nohow, the eloping groom has been suddenly pardoned, or, 
at least, paroled. The other day he received an entirely un- 
expected invitation to the Smiths for dinner. To say that he 
accepted it is hardly adequate. He reveled in it. He received 
it at his club, and was hopping around for joy when a friend in- 
terrupted him to ask what was the matter. 

"I have been invited to dinner; I have been invited to din- 
ner," he responded rapturously. 

"Great Lord!" uttered his friend, "is that all? You must be 
hungry. Are you broke?" 

"Terribly — but it was my heart." 
8- o- 5 

After months of effort, I understand that an effort is 
to be made to induce the California post-offices to place a 
world's fair cancellation stamp on all letters leaving the State, 
and that this has already been done in San Francisco. This is 
something. It were ill-mannered, if entirely possible, to put 
one's finger exactly on the weak spots of our world's fair com- 
mittee. There really exists a necessity for putting some ginger 
into the work. There is a little too much quiet and self-con- 
tained deportment. There is need of a little, or perhaps a good 
deal, of old-fashioned camp-meeting enthusiasm to revive the 
latent and sleeping energies of those on the outside. The mem- 
bers of the committee, as ail know, are gentlemen of cultured 
taste, who have a reserve of power and ability that would look 
well in action. Let it not be understood as belittling their ef- 
forts, but the signs are that the ropes must be thrown out for a 
long, strong and energetic haul on the wagon, or the brakes 
will slip, and she will go down hill instead of forging ahead to 
that apex to which all eyes are set. 



Poets have sung, and the field of literature gleams with 

many a gem of prose, in honor of tobacco, but what son of 
Adam's misery has ever written a panegyric on the cigarette? 



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San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 




"Then Lord God, not wholly satisfied, 

When the dawn glowed and trembled, dipped his pen, 

And wrote a lyric. Ah! and then — and then 

Thou — grave, tender, smiling, starry-eyed!" 



A new book of poems is in the market. It is called "Soldiers 
of Light," and is written by Helen Gray Cone. 

Those into whose hands this new book may fall will immedi- 
ately discern in its subtle, artistic quality and fine spiritual 
exaltation, that the promise of her youth was not mistaken by 
the critics who hailed and appreciated her earlier work. "Sol- 
diers of the Light" will stand with the new books by Anna 
Hempstead Branch, Edwin Arlington Robinson and Agnes Lee, 
in marking a distinct period in the new poetic development in 
America. 

Miss Cone's work is imbued in every line with fine spiritual 
insight, and she emphasizes it in her own peculiar way by typi- 
fying the ideal through human duty, sacrifice and justice. The 
whole sense of power and insight, by which her poetry becomes 
a communication, an embodiment, is felt in the remarkable son- 
net which we quote here: 

"The common street climbed up against the sky, 
Gray meeting gray; and wearily to and fro 
I saw the patient, common people go, 
Each with his sordid burden trudging by. 
And the rain dropped ; there was not any sigh 
Or stir of a live wind; dull, dull, and slow 
All motion; as a tale told long ago 
The faded world ; and creeping night drew nigh. 

"Then burst the sunset, flooding far and fleet, 
Leavening the whole of life with magic leaven. 
Suddenly down the long, wet, glistening hill 
Pure splendor poured — and lo ! the common street, 
A golden highway into golden heaven, 
With the dark shapes of men ascending still." 

Miss Cone's book is one of the most significant volumes of 
poetry of the year. 



Helen Coale Crew, a new author, is a welcome addition to the 
fold of American poets. Mrs. Crew takes a seat in the choir 
that holds such singers as Miss Reese, Miss Branch, Edith 
Thomas, Josephine Preston Peabody, Agnes Lee, Helen Gray 
Cone, and Bliss Carman, Edwin Arlington Robinson, Ridgeley 
Torrance, Thos. S. Jones, Jr., and Richard Burton. 

Mrs. Crew's poems, which she has titled "Aegean Echoes and 
Other Poems," may be divided into two parts, though she 
makes no such arbitrary division in her book. Perhaps she 
was not conscious of the distinction in grouping the verses, but 
it is as palpable in feeling and conception as in the more direct 
choice of subject. The first half of the book is echoed from 
the Greek world, that beautiful world of the pagan spirit, 
touched with the light and the passion, the flame-like sense of 
physical beauty, of love and sorrow in hero and myth. The 
second half is modern in sympathy and theme, with a penetrat- 
ing insight almost breathless in its spiritual revelation. This 
blending of the two worlds in her verse, the dim, mellow memo- 
ries of the Grecian world with its desires and dreams reawak- 
ened in the magic of her imagination, and the modern world, 
with its psychology of motive, its complexed web of aspira- 
tions and hope interpreted through an intuitional sympathy, 
offers a rich and suggestive spiritual lure. We subjoin "Thou" 
as an invitation to every lover of poetry to read — and possess — 
Mrs. Crew's book: 

"Lord God would write an epic, and the world, 
New-moulded from the void, rolled into space 
And with heaven's glittering myriads took its place, 
Sapphired with oceans, and with sands empearled. 

"Lord God would write an elegy. Swift grew 
Great Babylon and Memphis, Athens, Rome; 
Only to perish under dust and loam 
Of centuries, 'neath heaven's relentless blue. 



Another book of verse that may be commended is by Ger- 
trude Litchfield, and is called "Les Enfants." 

Miss Litchfield sings in a wholly new field, one quite distant 
from the broad highway of humanity, but one which is full of 
delight and loveliness. In the preface to these verses the author 
says : "It is not of the French-Canadians in Canada that I write, 
but the families of the French-Canadian immigrants in New 
England . . . These little children, acquiring the English lan- 
guage, struggling with new words, putting aside their native 
speech for the time being, yet recurring to it often in moments 
of hesitancy and with strange confusions in grammar, gives us 
a unique and fascinating dialect. It is this dialect which I have 
tried to portray with such accuracy and sympathetic love that 
they will seem to my readers the real, warm-hearted, spontane- 
ous, beauty-loving little beings which they are to me." 

Some of the most characteristic poems are too long to quote 
here, though in "Hoppee Toad" one cannot resist quoting the 
last two stanzas, in the making of which the magic of Stevens 
was utilized: 

"I never know, but in de dirt, 

Dere I seen you eat you' shirt. 

Wen you pull it off you' back 

Dere's anoder brown an' black 

Underneat it, — jus' de sam'! 

Ma foi! Avez-vous faim? 

"If I know dat you get lef 
An' you hev for eat you'se'f, 
'Stead of catching bug an' fly 
I would feed you, by an' by, 
Wen again I pass de road, 
Hoppee, hoppee, hoppee-toad!" 



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In England last year, winter most persistently "lingered in 
the lap of spring." As late as May 6th there was a flurry of 
snow in London. And Whit-Monday was looked forward to 
more eagerly than usual. 

This spring festival is the favorite of all holidays. A mil- 
lion or two people, not only of the working class, but gathered 
from all walks of life, hail with joy this "outing" time more 
than any other in the year. For then dear old England is at her 
best. All of the lovely suburbs are invaded — Epping Forest, 
so dear to the heart of the Londoner; Epsom and other 
"downs;" Richmond and even stately Windsor. But to the 
lower working classes — the Coster, his "pal" and his "gal" — 
'Ampstead 'Eath is the Mecca and delight. I had ever wanted 
to go when I could see 'Arry and his 'Arriet in their glory. 

Whit-Monday dawned over London last year in all the pris- 
tine beauty of an English May day. I invited a young woman, 
one of the daughters of the house in which I was living, to go 
with me. So with my "pal," formalities are dropped for this 
day; we started on foot from Russell Square to King's Cross 
"Stytion." There we took the underground for the 'Eath. On 
leaving the coach thirty-five minutes later, we found ourselves 
at the bottom of a hill. Ascending leisurely, we enjoyed the 
glorious panorama, as mile after mile of this great playground 
was exposed to view. Our spirits ran high. We could not es- 
cape the infection of the glorious air and balmy sunshine. 
Large patches of primroses, cowslips and daisies were glisten- 
ing in the sunshine. Lilacs and laburnum, hawthorne, pink 
and white, were budding and blooming. Oaks, birch and lime 
trees with, I declare, a dozen or more shades of green, made 
the Heath a fairyland. The birds, too, the robin, thrush and 
oriole, sang — aye, shouted in choruses of joy, for they had 
waited long for the spring. 

I thought of an English poet, who gave us a sweet verse : 

"I went to the merry green wood in the lovely month of May, 
For to fetch the summer home." 

There were tens of thousands of working people there that 
day. All kinds of games and shows; hundreds of stands for 
eatables and liquids. And I was impressed as never before 
with the abounding good-nature of an English crowd. It does 
one good to mingle with them, they are so happy. Thousands 
of costers were there in all their glory, corduroy jackets and 
waistcoats sprinkled with row after row of smoky pearl buttons. 
The real "high-lighter," the "leaders" have them sewn on their 
trousers as well. The coster is found living all over London, 
as far east as Leadenhall street, in the neighborhood of London 
Bridge, and west to Putney. He is apprenticed to the butcher, 
the baker and the candle-stick maker. Often he has a "busi- 
ness of his own," and acquires quite a fortune. 

It was wonderful to witness the love-making of the "bloke" 
and his "rag." I heard conversation not easy to make out: 

"Blime, 'Liz, yer might tell a bloke wot 'e's done. Ain't I 
allers treated you like a l'ydy? Carn't yer tell a bloke?" 

"Aw, come off! As if yer didn't know, yer bloomin' rotter." 

And some of the introductions were interesting. 

"Miss Dobbin, I mikes yer 'quainted wif me pal, Mr. 'Ackett. 
BILL, this 'ere's the l'ydy I was tellin' yer abart." Much bow- 
ing and gripping of hands. 

The 'coster and his "pal" is a master expert at dancing. 
Something between a jig and I should say a clog. And his 
"gal" shows skill, some grace and great endurance in skipping. 
'Arry will turn the rope by the hour, while 'Arriet skips. My 
companion and I were edging away from a circle of "artists," 
feeling ourselves intruding, yet wanting to remain. One sent 
out a challenge: " 'Ave a try, l'ydy!" My "pal" took it up, 
stepped into the ring and made a record, to the great glee of all. 

We were at once taken into their embrace, adopted, so to 
speak. There was another game in which they made of them- 
selves a human merrv-ijo-round, and which they called "Ring- 
around a rosy, oh!" 

A pretty girl told us later that they planned to scare . 
"bloomin" toffs" — meaning us. I could never see why we were 
"sized up" as being "swells," having worn our oldest clothes in 
anticipation of the tramp over the vast Heath. 

"We thought at fust as 'ow yer might spile the d'y." said this 



lassie, who, so she told us, was a flower girl with her "stand" or 
"pitch" in St. Paul's Churchyard. 

"But we're rale glad yer j'ined us; eh, Ted," to her mash. 

"Right-o," from Ted, who was busily cutting off buttons as 
souvenirs for us. There were a few master costers, "bloated 
bond 'olders," we were told. 

The coster has a decided "code of honor." They are great 
for a stand-up fight. "We likes to use our fists," they say. As 
a clan they do not harbor malice. After they have pounded 
each other to a jelly, they shake hands and are friends for life. 

Among the many stands where tea was to be had. we picked 
out one and sat down to enjoy the "cup that cheers," whilst en- 
joying the beautiful, rolling country. 

It was now late afternoon. Colors and clouds were changing. 
The evening birds were beginning to call. I was told that not 
until midnight would 'Ampstead 'Eath be entirely deserted. 
But many were leaving. Hundreds of little "Mokes," who had 
nibbled all day, were hitched to the donkey barrow carts. The 
costers donned their mole-skin caps and tied their large, spotted 
silk 'kerchiefs under their chin. I saw many clumsily, yet with 
affectionate roughness, tying them around the neck of their 
"rag," to keep them from "tyking" cold. With a "shike 'im up, 
old pal," meaning his donkey, and to us, "Good-bye; glad ter 
know yer; we've 'ad a 'appy d'y," they were off. 

Our route home was by 'bus, through many charming suburbs, 
meadows of buttercups and fragrant hedges of sweet brier and 
thorn. The day at Hampstead Heath had been a revelation and 
a delight. But it was restful to get away from the noisy, if 
happy, crowd, and to come in the late spring English twilight 
back to London town. 

Eleanor Connell. 



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10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 



Major Clavering, retired, and living in a suburban village, 
had pains and aches and stiff joints, and therefore when there 
was business to be done in the city, he delegated it to his 
daughter, Faith. 

Even after she had arrived at the age of 20, and had been 
making shopping and other trips for two years, the father would 
call her before him when she was ready to go again and say : 

"Now, firstly, look out for your purse ; secondly, if a strange 
man addresses you, appeal to the nearest policeman; thirdly, 
beware of the policeman himself; fourthly, if there is an acci- 
dent on the train, keep cool. Fifthly, if any one attempts to 
kidnap you, bite and kick and scratch. Sixthly, don't miss the 
train coming back, and keep us all in a stew." 

Miss Faith would repeat the instructions forwards and back- 
wards. She always listened in humility and always rejoined: 

"Why, dadJy, what can possibly happen?" 

"A million things can happen, and you be on your guard 
against every single one of thern. You are the daughter of 
Major Clavering. If the occasion ever arises when you can 
make a heroine of yourself and don't do it, I shall feel like dis- 
owning you. I guess that's all to-day, but you look out." 

Two long years, and at least fifty trips to the city and back, 
and yet Miss Faith Clavering was no heroine. It was not her 
fault. She had always been ready. 

On this occasion she started off prepared for collisions, pick- 
pockets, mad dogs, Black Handers and all other sorts of folks 
and things, but a* the same time she wasn't worrying. 

At 2 o'clock in the afternoon she had finished her errands 
and was ready to take the subway to the Grand Central station. 
Of course the train was crowded. Of course an old bald-head 
with a rubicund nose and a masher's smirk rose up and waved 
Miss Faith to his seat, but after one glance at him she con- 
tinued to be a strap-hanger. 

There was a jam as she got off, and another on the stairway, 
and some one twitched her purse out of her hand. 

The supreme moment had come at last. The girl gave a gasp, 
braced up and turned to the man beside her and seized his arm 
and said, firmly: 

"You have my purse, sir, and if you don't restore it I will 
give you in charge." 

"You are mistaken, miss," was the reply. 

"I am not. You just twitched it out of my hand." 

"I beg you to believe to the contrary. My hands have been 
in my pockets to protect my own. I think it was a rat of a boy 
who crowded between us." 

Miss Faith turned and looked at her prisoner. He was a 
young man with a rather aristocratic face and a pleasant voice. 
He would have been picked out anywhere as a gentleman. 

The girl removed her hand and was on the point of making 
an apology, when a special warning of her father's came to 
mind: 

"And, Faith," he had said, "never take a man for what he 
looks like. The greater the villain, the better his clothes. The 
rascal who got my watch five years ago claimed to be a member 
of the President's cabinet, and looked the part." 

"Will you give up the purse?" demanded the girl as her face 
hardened. 

"May I present my card and identify myself?" was asked in 
reply, and there was a smile on the young man's face instead 
of a look of worriment. 

A policeman who scented trouble came strolling that way, 
and Miss Faith nodded to him and said: 

"Officer, I give this person in charge! He has got my purse." 

"Sure, Miss?" asked the bluecoat after a glance at the pris- 
oner. 

"I am, sir." 

"Because, if you are not exactly sure, you know " 

"But I am." 

"Then I'll take him to the station, but you must come, too, 
and make complaint." 

"I assure you that you are making a grave mistake, miss," 
said the young man to his accuser, but he smiled as he said so. 

"I'm sure I'm not." 

The officer and his prisoner rode to the station in one taxi, 
and the complainant in another, and the three arrived together. 

When they stood at the sergeant's desk it seemed to the girl 
as if some signal passed — some signal that made the sergeant 



grin, but she bravely went ahead and made one complaint, 
and was told to appear in court the next forenoon at 10 o'clock. 

She had her return ticket in her glove, where prudent girls 
always carry them, and as she took the train for home she real- 
ized that she was a heroine. Her father would praise her to the 
skies. He would call her the brave daughter of a brave man. 
He might even buy her a gold watch and have it suitably in- 
scribed. 

In the station house behind her there was chuckling and 
laughing and saying : 

"Well, well, but it is funny!" But of course she couldn't 
know that. Instead of being cracked on the head and jammed 
into a cell, the prisoner was permitted to sit in the captain's 
room and smoke and finally to wander away. 

Miss Faith reached her station and home an hour late. The 
Major had become nervous, as was always the case, and was 
at the gate to meet her and to ask: 

"Haven't I told you what to do in all emergencies?" 

"Yes, daddy." 

"And in this emergency ?" 

"I had him arrested and locked up. He tried hard to bluff 
me, but I went through with it. He was a pickpocket, you 
know." 

"Great Scott! Mother, hear what Faith is saying! A 
pickpocket got her purse, and she had him arrested." 

"Dear me!" 

"Brave girl! Noble girl!" said the father, as he patted the 
daughter on the shoulder. "So you had him locked up, eh?" 

"Yes, and I went to the station and made the complaint 
against him." 

"Hear that, mother? Our little heroine goes to the police 
station to see that the fellow is properly booked! Oh, I've al- 
ways said that she had the courage of her father. Was the 
thief a boy or man?" 

"A young man." 

"Had a tough look, I suppose?" 

"Well, no; he looked to be a thorough gentleman. He stood 
up so straight that the thought came to me he was a soldier." 

"But he couldn't have been, of course. You got his name, 
didn't you?" 

"Yes. He gave it to the police as Captain Bryn Merrit." 

"W-h-a-t!" yelled thp Major as he fairly jumped clear of the 
floor. 

"Why, what ails you, daddy?" 

"Captain Brvn Merrit! You — you charged him with pocket- 
picking! You had him arrested! You had him locked up! You 
— you " 

"And why not?" 

"Because I know him. Because he's now the captain of my 
old company. Because he's a gentleman. Because he's one 
of the nicest young chaps in the world. You are no heroine. 
You are almost an idiot." 

"Daddy!" 

"And I had invited him to come down and see us some day 
next week! No use of your crying. You've got us all in a bad 
scrape, and if the captain falls in love with you, you've got to 
marry him to get us out." 

The captain is in the Philippines now. When he comes home 
there may be a wedding. At least, the correspondence covers 
four and five pages at a time on both sides. — Laurence Alfred 
Clay in Boston Globe. 



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Henry Miller in "The Havoc" at the Columbia. 

From whatever angle you look at it, "The Havoc" must be 
considered a great play. It is almost beyond belief to realize 
that this is the first long play that H. S. Sheldon, the author, 
has written. It is said that he has written several vaudeville 
acts with considerable success. The knowledge he exhibits of 
the technique of play construction is really remarkable, and 
this is all the more wonderful when one considers that there are 
only three characters who carry the play through three re- 
markable acts. 

Sheldon has taken a unique situation and treated it with bold- 
ness and daring that fairly takes your breath away. It is a 
play that is bound to invite discussion; in fact, what play does 
not which deals with some phase of the social problem, and 
here the author has done what others have not, treated an old 
subject in an entirely new manner. Very often he wanders to 
the verge of improbability and beyond the bounds of reason, 
and he shows at least to my way of thinking a certain weakness 
in making the home-wrecker and wife-stealer a man absolutely 
devoid of one single decent trait, while the other chap is repre- 
sented as a man of irreproachable character; in fact a very 
paragon of all the virtues. Had he made these two men nearly 
equal in mentality and to some extent in virtues, the battle 
would have taken on a different aspect, and there would have 
been more logic and rationalism to it all, but as it is, it appears 
altogether too one-sided and in places almost unfair. These 
things are, of course, all a matter of opinion, and many there 
are who will think the author perfectly justified in his charac- 
ter drawing and the types he has sketched. At times the author 
shows almost positive genius in the development of his situa- 
tions and in being able to take three characters through three 
acts in which he builds scene upon scene until you sit back and 
wonder how it is all going to end. In this connection, his con- 
structive ability is far beyond the ordinary. One might almost 
say that he has taken the bit between his teeth and galloped 
away from tradition and conventionality. He everywhere gives 
evidence of remarkable perception and keen insight. 

It is hard enough to take the ordinary one-act vaudeville 
play with only three characters and evolve any sort of a 
coherent story, but this man Sheldon, with only three charac- 
ters, sweeps them through three acts with unflagging interest, 
which at times borders on the intense. The story tells about a 
busy business man who loves his wife, but has very little time 
to devote to her on account of said business necessities. They 
keep a boarder, a mutual friend, a man of supposed advanced 
ideas and theories, which he expounds on every possible oc- 
casion, and which the husband treats lightly, and which the wife 
accepts. She does not love her husband. Now comes the 
friend, and speaks of his love to her. Dazzled and enmeshed 
by his smooth talk and his supposed fervid feeling for her, she 
is led to believe in him and to love him. At this juncture they 
are caught in a compromising situation, which is daring to say 
the least, and which shows the husband the relations existing 
between the two. On the impulse of the moment, the husband 
wants to shoot them, but on second and maturer thought he 
suggests a plan to them. He divorces his wife and she marries 
the lover. The husband and boarder will then change places. 
The ex-husband becomes the boarder, and he tells them in a 
wonderfully graphic and dramatic scene to work out their own 
damnation. The working out of this cunningly devised plan is 
where the author shows his great skill. The lines are crammed 
full of significance and meaning, and are crisp and terse and at 
times epigrammatic. The situations are all unusual in develop- 
ment and climax, and at times are actually thrilling in suspense. 
Mr. Miller has a role which seems expressly made to order 
for him. Miller has always been a good actor, and very often 
a very good one. In this part he is at his best. He rises to his 
big scenes splendidly, and never once does he allow the role to 
run away with him. He is extremely natural throughout, though 
at times he has the habit of slurring his words and not being 
understandable. It is a habit he has had ever since I have 
known him. Very often he slurs in his best speeches, and ac- 



cordingly many important words are missed. His work on the 
whole, however, is powerful, and I know of no actor who would 
be liable to make more of the role than he does. Being his own 
producer, he sounds the key-note of acting in the play, and it is 
repression and naturalness. Francis Byrne as the lover does a 
fine piece of acting, which nearly always measures up to that 
of the star. He was a happy selection for the part. He took 
his cue from Miller, and always keeps within the bounds of re- 
pression. 

Laura Hope Crews, a former San Francisco girl, who has 
been seen here at various times in other plays, does the role 
of the wife. It is an ungrateful and very difficult character, 
but Miss Crews invests it with realism, and, best of all, natu- 
ralness. It is work which, under ordinary circumstances, would 
elevate any other actress to stardom. Miss Crews has broadened 
and developed wonderfully during the last few years, and I be- 
lieve that it will not be long before the lady, if she continues to 
improve, will see her name emblazoned in electric letters over 
the entrance to theatres. She deserves the distinction. Daniel 
Pennell has only a few lines in the last act, but he is fully in 
keeping with the atmosphere created by the others. The two 
stage settings are very good, and as complete as it is possible 
to make them. 

We look on Mr. Miller as more or less of a San Francisco in- 
stitution, and he is unusually well liked here, and his reception 
Monday evening was noisy and spontaneous. After ten or 
twelve curtain calls after the first act he made a graceful speech, 
thanking everybody and telling us how much he thought of us. 
The house was a big one and very enthusiastic. The play should 
do two weeks of tremendous business. It is big in every vital 
essential, and from a purely dramatic standpoint can be unani- 



1 







Mile. Mina Minar, who will appear next week in the "Dar- 
ling of Paris" at the Orpheum. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 



mously called an emphatic success. For his third week here 
Mr. Miller is to present a new play to us, entitled "The End of 
the Bridge," which was tried out last March in Boston with con- 
siderable success. The author is Florence Lincoln, another new 
one at the playwriting game. Mr. Miller thinks much of the 
possibilities of the drama, and he should know, as he is the real 
original Christopher Columbus when it comes to finding new 
playwrights who can write real plays. 

* * * 

"Arsene Lupin" at the Alcazar. 

This French detective play was seen in New York last sea- 
son, where it enjoyed an extensive run. I believe that it was 
William Courtenay who there essayed the title role. The play 
is new to this city; in fact, I am of the belief that it has been 
seen in few cities outbide of the big Eastern metropolis, so we 
should consider ourselves fortunate in getting a glimpse of it 
so early in the game. Of course, from the standpoint of logic 
and reason and common sense the play is balderdash, and not 
worth while, but if you have an elastic imagination and you feel 
like going back to your dime novel days, you will certainly en- 
joy "Arsene Lupin." It is full of thrills and melodramatic 
touches. The first act is somewhat disconnected, but the other 
acts have coherence aid action without stint. Unlike the Sher- 
lock Holmes stories, the thief is made the central figure, and 
in this case somewhat of a hero. 

As I stated, the fabric of the v/hole thing is wildly impossi- 
ble, but speaking for myself, I must confess that I thoroughly 
enjoyed every moment of it, and everywhere in the theatre you 
could see people leaning forward with fixed intensity in their 
stare, eager as to the outcome of the battle of wits between the 
thief and the detective. When I read the book, I was at a loss 
to see how the thing could be dramatized. Whoever has adapted 
it for stage use has displayed not a little ingenuity and discern- 
ment. There are any number of big climaxes, which should 
quicken the pulses of young and old alike, and there is the nec- 
essary love story running through it, and there are any number 
of mechanical effects which manage to keep you guessing, and 
near the end of the play, when the thief is rounded up and 
stands with handcuffs on his wrists, you sympathize with him, 
and wish that circumstances had allowed him to foil the detec- 
tives just once more. In a moment all this is changed when, by 
some means, Lupin frees himself of the handcuffs, and with 
a supposed bcmb in his hands, defies the entire force of detec- 
tives to take him, and before they realize what is taking place, 
Lupin, by means of a mechanical contrivance in the room, van- 
ishes and succeeds in imprisoning the chief detective himself, 
and a moment later the thief' emerges, made up to look like the 
detective, and escapes before the very eyes of the police. It 
goes without saying that all this is very exciting and succeeds 
in keeping up the interest at fever heat. Impossible as the 
play is, it is vastly entertaining, and this atones for many 
things. New York liked it for a whole season, and I would not 
be surprised to see it run here for two or three weeks. 

The play introduces us to Richard Bennett, who was seen 
here not so long ago as leading man with Maud Adams. Ben- 
nett plays Lupin, and gives a very creditable performance. He 
is an engaging fellow whose method is easy and natural, a 
fluent and distinct speaker, and evidently a student in his pro- 
fession. I can remember Bennett for some years, my attention 
being first turned to him when he played the role of a young 
priest in some Anthony Hope play, I believe it was, in which 
W. H. Thompson, who is now at the Orpheum, did the role of a 
Cardinal. It is possible the play may have been by Marion 
Crawford. This was some years ago, and at that time Bennett 
showed much promise. His progress has been steady and most 
encouraging since then. I shall watch him with much interest 
while at the Alcazar. 

He brings with him as his leading lady Miss Mabel Morrison, 
daughter of the late Lewis Morrison and step-daughter of 
Florence Roberts. Some years ago, it would not be fair to 
say how many, I succeeded White Whittlesey in the role of 
"Faust," with Lewis Morrison. My Marguerite at that time was 
Mabel Morrison, then but a slip of a girl. She had ability in 
plenty, and some years after, I heard that she had married 
Richard Bennett, and now she is a happy wife and mother, as 
well as a very capable actress. The role she has in this play is 
rather an ungrateful one, and does not afford her much op- 
portunity, but whatever chance she has to distinguish herself 
she does right nobly. She shows emotional power and a marked 



understanding of the technique of her work. I was much 
pleased with her, and under the tutelage of her talented hus- 
band she should develop much more. The role of the detec- 
tive Guerchard is in the hands of E. L. Bennison. Due credit 
must be given this actor for an effective portrayal, in fact a part 
which he has within the space of a few days molded into a re- 
markable character study. In the many scenes he has with 
Bennett, it must be candidly stated that Bennison never once 
suffers by comparison. He rises splendidly to every situation 
and scene, and makes an effective foil. 

Wesner is satisfactory in a character role, which seems to 
be second nature with him. Gunn is very good as the bluster- 
ing and egotistical magistrate, and Roy Clements surprised me 
with his performance of Charolais. Walter Belasco had one 
of those "bits" which he does so well. He can never do any- 
thing poorly, and as the old servant left in charge of the cha- 
teau, he has a short scene all by himself on the stage which 
is simply fine. Viola Leach is good as Germaine. She is ever 
conscientious and trying to do her best. 

There is a long list of small parts, some in capable hands, 
and some in the hands of evident amateurs. It is a big thing 
to work up within a few days, and everybody has done well 
under the circumstances. I don't care who the man or woman 
is, I feel positive that they will enjoy "Arsene Lupin." It is 
crowded with action, and after the first act there is a thrill 

every minute. I advise you to go and see it. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
Having scored one of the most emphatic hits in Alcazar an- 
nals, "Arsene Lupin" is to be retained at that theatre through- 
out the coming week. For this success there is a two-fold cause 
— the play's sterling merit, and the splendid acting of Richard 
Bennett as its principal character. There is no possibility of 
the play being continued a third week, as an unbreakable con- 
tract necessitates the presentation of "Pierre of the Plains" on 

Monday evening, August 7th. 

* * * 

A big pantomime production will be offered next week at the 
Orpheum in "The Darling of Paris," the European sensation 
that was brought to this country by Morris Gest. The star of 
the performance is Mile. Mina Minar. The twenty people in the 
act include a number of beautiful girls. "The Darling of Paris" 
tells a tragic story of love, hatred and revenge. A marvelous 
acrobatic Apache dance is introduced. 

A jolly good lot of fun is promised in the performance of 



Alcazar Theatre 



Sutter and Stelner Streets. 
Phones— West 1400. Home S. 4242. 



Week commencing Monday evening, July 81st The eminent Ameri- 
cas actor, RICHARD BENNETT, aided by Mabel Morrison and the 
Alcazar players, in 

ARSENE LUPIN, 
Adapted from the French novel similarly titled. The greatest de- 
tective play ever staged. Its first time In Sao Francisco. 
Prices — Night, 25c. to $1; matinee. 25c. to 50c. Matinee Saturday 
and Sunday. Seats on sale at box-office and Emporium. 



Columbia Theatre 

Gottlob, Marx & Co., Managers. 



Corner Geary and Mason Sts. 
Phones Franklin 150. 
Home C 5783. 



u begins Monday. Julv 31st. Matinees Wednes- 
liKXKY MTLLER, in bis tremendous dramatic 



Second and last wee 
days and Saturdays. 
success, 

THE HAVOC, 
By H. S. Sheldon. 

Monday nisht. August 7th — Henry Miller in a new play, THE END 
OF THE BRIDGE. 

New Orpheum bum Powel , 

Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre In America. 

Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

A MARVELOUS BILL. 
"THE darling of PARIS " Europe's newest sensation, featuring 
Mile. Mina Minar; THE DANDIES, In Henry J. Corners English 

Musical Mekiriyr, ", Mir Audii-necs; - ' HORACE WRIGHT .in, I IlKXE 

DIETRICH, the somewhat different singers; LEIPZIG, the Royal 
Conjuror: M. Nedervcld's SIMIAN JOCKEY; DAN BURKE and 

THE WONDER GIRLS; PAT, TWO COLEYS & PAY; NEW DAY- 
LIGHT MOTION PICTURES. Lasl week, great irtlstlc tri- 
umph, WM. H. THOMPSON In !..■., I - ,»n .,,1 ],]:iv, 
"THE WISE RABBI." 

Evening prices. 10c. 25c, 50c. 75c Box seats. $1. Mai 
(except Sundays and holidays), 10c, 25c, 50c. Phones Douglas 70; 
Home C 1570. 



TRINITY SCHOOL 

Accredited to the Universities 

Studies will be resumed August 1, 1911 
846 Stanyan St., San Francisco LEON H. ROGER. B. S„ Principal 



July 29, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



"The Dandies," in their musical melange and burlesque, "Our 
Audiences." The three men and two women who appear in it 
are most capable entertainers. 

A particularly refreshing and neat singing act will be offered 
by Horace Wright and Rene Dietrich, a "sweet-voiced duo," 
who have the happy faculty of pieasing both the eye and ear. 

"Leipzig," the famous magician, who is known abroad as 
"the Royal Conjuror," will be at the Orpheum next week. He is 
considered the greatest card and coin manipulator in the world, 
and as a conjuror he is always most mystifying. 

M. Nederveld's Simian Jockey, "Seppel," who will appear 
in the coming bill, is a natural comedian, and cleverer than 
others of his species. 

Next week will be the last of Dan Burke and his Wonder 
girls, Fay, two Coleys and Fay, and also of that splendid actor, 
William H. Thompson in "The Wise Rabbi." 



Henry Miller in "The 
Havoc" has repeated in 
San Francisco the over- 
whelming success he 
scored in New York last 
year during the long run 
of H. S. Sheldon's re- 
markable play at the Bi- 
jou Theatre. 

Following this and 
next week's engagement 
in "The Havoc," Mr. 
Miller will present for 
one week only a new 
play by Florence Lin- 
coln, "The End of the 
Bridge," which won the 
Harvard prize for dra- 
matic composition last 
year, and which, al- 
though produced for one 
week only in Boston last 
March, scored such a re- 
markable success for a 
new play in a city the 
size of Boston. 





tf0A^ 








■ 



Henry Miller in "The Havoc" 
at the Columbia Theatre. 



"The Spring Maid" Coming West. 

Managers Werba & Luescher announce that they will in the 
near future produce in San Francisco and the West the bright 
operetta, "The Spring Maid," which has captivated New York 
and Chicago as no other operetta or musical comedy has cap- 
tivated them since the days of "Florodora's" two years' run. 

The company that Werba & Luescher will send West will 
have for its star Miss Mizzi Hajos, a young and charming Hun- 
garian beauty, engaged specially for this production. The 
composer of "The Spring Maid," Heinrich Reinhardt, has de- 
clared that Miss Hajos is ideal in her part of the saucy Carls- 
bad princess. She is described as being a beautiful, bright- 
eyed little blonde, sweet-voiced and an admirable actress. 

Thomas Conkey will act as the dashing Prince Aladar in the 
operetta, and has already made a strong impression in rehear- 
sals. 

Miss Hajos will make her debut at Atlantic City, N. J., 
August 7th. 



H. J. Stewart, the well-known musician and composer, whose 
music has long since earned him fame, continues to add to the 
list of his excellent productions. He has just had published 
an "Indian Love Sonc." the words of which have been written 
by Dr. J. Wilson Shiels of the Bohemian Club. It is a charming 
bit of music, fully descriptive of the subject. It is in high A and 
low F. 

Two more recent productions of H. J. Stewart, possessing 
great merit are "Best <^f All" (high G, low E), and "He Kissed 
Her" (high B. low G.) The former is the words of Robert 
Browning's "Summum bonum," set to music. The words of the 
latter are by Robert Darrach. 

These fine songs are published by J. Fisher & Bro., New 
York. 




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14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 





tXILTX 



-^f 



In auditing the accounts of the tea table conversation of the 
week, the Fair site decision adds up into the largest sum. Even 
the rumor that that most v?riable quantity in Paris, the waist 
line, has hitched another notch in its orbit and has moved up 
still nearer the arm hole, has not made a dent in the chatter of 
the week. The startling statement that the Paris designers have 
written an epitaph for the short coat and have invited the world 
to the christening party of the three-quarter length garment, did 
not prove succulent enough bait to turn the conversation away 
from the exposition. 

Of course, interest in the woman's auxiliary to the exposition 
board has revived, and before long we shall see phantom swords 
flash through the air, en route spilling the blood of much refined 
sarcasm and of ladylike epigrams. It isn't sportsmanlike to 
expect that the women's board will be formed by the painless 
method — the men have not set that example. 

An infant board of feminine gender came into the world 
weeks ago, but the majority pronounced it an illegitimate child. 
It appeared with all officers already elected, and asked the rest 
of womankind to join in the procession. The women came, saw, 
but were not conquered. Then Mr. Moore addressed the women, 
and bravely informed them that they were "previous," and 
could not be granted recognition by the men at that stage of the 
game. 

So the only course open to fair-minded women is to remove 
the bar-sinister and organize anew. There are a number of 
society women already identified with the board, Mrs. Henry T. 
Scott, Mrs. Robert Oxnard, Mrs. J. B. Tucker, Mrs. Lawrence 
Scott, Mrs. Eleanor Martin and Miss Laura McKinstry. These 
women are particularly anxious chat the organization shall be 
thoroughly representative ; that it shall not carry excess bag- 
gage in the form of any particular set or sets of women, but 
shall take on color from all the varying clans in this cosmo- 
politan city. If the organization is not thoroughly representa- 
tive, it will not be the fault of the society women interested in 
it, for they are most keen on that point. 
SB© 

How far we have traveled from the former standards of 
ladylike behavior was strikingly illustrated the other day at a 
fashionable hotel not a hundred miles from Monterey. The 
woman who told me about it wandered into an inviting rocker 
on a secluded side of the veranda, and was having a lovely 
party with a day drearx: and solitude, when two young girls, one 
about sixteen and the other eighteen, snuggled down in seats 
just the other side of the post, drew out cigarette cases and 
commenced to puff. In a few moments, the elder sister of one 
of the girls, herself a prominent young matron in the B'lingum 
set, bore down upon the adolescent smokers with fire in her eye. 

My friend was amused, as she knew that the young matron 
herself was devoted to an occasional cigarette. So my friend 
sat up, prepared to hear the lady preach what she doesn't prac- 
tice. But what she did bear was: "You girls smoke those cigar- 
ettes like farmers. I'm ashamed of you. For heaven's sake, 
smoke with some style. Here, I'll show you how to hold yours. 
That's better, though it's still awkward. Now, blow your smoke 
this way. I'm glad th?t no one saw you — I'll have to take you 
in hand and teach you to smoke like ladies." 

Which shows that all standards are made of elastic. 
© © © 

It would seem that certain accidents run in certain families, 
even as certain shades of hair and tricks of manner. For in- 
stance, the Von Schroeder star of destiny seems to travel in a 
parallel course with runaway horses. This family has always 
been devoted to the horse, even the advent of the automobile 
not taking the edge off their love of the sports provided by the 
horse. But they have all at various times been the victims of 
more or less painful accidents. Miss Von Schroeder was injured 
in a runaway accident last year over in San Rafael, and it was 
months before she recovered from the injuries sustained at that 
time. And now Baron Von Schroeder is going through the 



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painful siege of a broken arm that is stubbornly mending and 
refuses to respond to the hurry-up coaxing of the most skillful 
physicians. Baroness Von Schroeder spent the week in town 
with her sister, Mrs. Eleanor Martin, but has returned to the 
San Luis Obispo ranch, taking with her several house guests, 
who will relieve the tedium of the Baron's convalescence. 
(P ® & 

The most unique affair of the week was the Lohengrin hop at 
the Presidio. Lohengrin is not written in hop time, but it was 
altogether fitting that the dance should be so designated, for 
the receiving party was made up entirely of brides and grooms, 
and the band played the wedding march with a tender sense of 
all it symbolized. There are so many newly-weds in the service 
just now that the perfume of orange blossoms can be detected 
in the air all the time by working the imagination in defiance 
of the eight-hour lav/. 

In the receiving party were Lieutenant and Mrs. W. S. Ful- 
ton, Lieutenant and Mrs. H. W. Stephenson, Lieutenant and 
Mrs. Bruce Butler, Lieutenant and Mrs. D. H. Crissy, Lieuten- 
ant and Mrs. C. Hines, Lieutenant and Mrs. R. G. Sherrard, 
Lieutenant and Mrs. C. B. Elliott, and Captain and Mrs. J. C. 
Bond. It was one of the bravest displays of wedding finery 
ever presented to the eye at one time, for all the brides wore 
their white satin bridal robes. It is not often given to the en- 
gaged girl to take notes on so many gowns, and it was evident 
that several belles present were sorting and labeling and choos- 
ing with an eye to future affairs of their own. Never has a re- 
ceiving line excited more comment, but fortunately, opinion was 
evenly enough divided as to the relative charm of the regiment 
of brides to keep the swords of their husbands sheathed. 
© © © 

Several scheduled events have been postponed, owing to 
bereavement in the family. Miss Evelyn Barron, it will be 
remembered, recalled the invitations for the barn dance she was 
to give the other week at the magnificent Barron place at May- 
field, owing to the death of a rather distant relative. But she has 
already set a date in September for the affair, and it will be even 
more elaborate and punctuated with more surprises than the 
projected affair that had to be abandoned. 
© © © 

There has never been a season when the country clubs have 
been so gay. Not only are the people living thereabouts mak- 



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July 29, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



1$ 



ing more use of them than ever, but even the people in town no 
longer consider it an unprofitable exertion to choo-choo over to 
Lagunitas, or Claremont, or down Menlo Park way for luncheon, 
returning to town the same day. The Lagunitas Country Club 
has had its luncheon calendar crowded all season, one of the 
prettiest affairs having been hostessed by Miss Marian Miller 
on Monday. Miss Miller does not feel the call of the antiseptic 
bandage and the sterilized milk bottle so strong that she is not 
going to take a few frolicsome canters at bridge luncheons and 
equally lightly-minded diversions before settling down to the 
serious business of the care of the sick. Among those who 
motored over from town for the luncheon Miss Miller gave on 
Monday were Mrs. Douglas Fry and Miss Harriet Alexander. 
The Misses Gertrude Thomas, Margaret Belden and Frances 
Martin, with the young hostess, filled another automobile that 
started from Ross Valley. 

© © © 

If society did not have a dramatic stunt on most of the time, 
the probability is that more members of the smart set would for- 
sake the satin-shod ways of the fashionable world for the hard 
life of the stage. But there is always an opportunity to get 
one's dramatic aspirations out of one's system for the benefit 
of sweet charity. The latest endeavor is for the benefit of the 
Armitage Orphanage, and will take the form of a vaudeville 
garden party to be given at Miss Jennie Crocker's new home 
in Burlingame on September 16th. Miss Crocker is expected 
home for the event, and will undoubtedly bring back some new 
stunt from abroad to add to the programme as her contribution. 

The most novel feature of the affair will be "the Beauty 
Show." Every man whose features are in the Class A structure 
class is being impressed into service, for the men are to be dis- 
guised as famous beauties and auctioned off by Mrs. Walter 
Martin, Mrs. Gene Murphy, Mrs. Laurence Scott, Mrs. Will 
Taylor, Mrs. Fred McNear, Miss Virginia Jolliffe and several 
other kindred spirits. As a result of serious study of old plates, 
many a man has been taken into the strong light and informed 
that with the help of some powder and paint and false hair and 
chiffons and laces he csn be palmed off as some famous beauty. 
Even Walter Martin's fatal gift of face-making has not kept 
him out of the running, and Peter Martin's liquid eyes will be 
trained to simulate the soft, languishing glances of some court 
beauty. The preparations for this event naturally keep fun 
going at a high rate of speed, and each rehearsal will be a 
treat for the fun-loving participants. 



MISS GERTRUDE HOFFMAN'S DANCES. 

Miss Gertrude Hoffman, the gifted young Californian, has 
announced in a handsomely prepared souvenir, that she will 
present this year a remarkable theatrical attraction in her "sai- 
son Russe," in the shape of a series of dances and mimodrama 
by a corps of the best Russian dancers that Europe could offer. 
Miss Hoffman, by dint of natural aptitude and assiduous study 
under able teachers in Europe, has become a wonderful dancer 
of the weird Russian steps and movements which are now the 
rage in the East, and has collected about her a competent staff 
of assistants. The costuming and scenic effects accompanying 
the productions of Mies Hoffman will be exceedingly striking. 

The repertoire will include "Les Sylphides," a romantic 
reverie in one tableau; "Cleopatra," a mimodrama in one act; 
"Scheherazade," a corypheic drama in one act; "Carnival," a 
pantomime-ballet in one act, and the ballet drama, "Prince 
Igor." 

Among the compose r s whose music will accompany the pro- 
ductions are Chopin, A. Arensky, N. Rimsky-Korsakow, I. 
Stravinsky and A. Borodine. 

Miss Hoffman's season is under the management of Morris 
Gest and F. Ray Comstock. 



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SOCIAL-PEKSOML ITEMS 




Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear In the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 

ENGAGEMENTS, 

TANNER-McMULLEN. — The engagement is announced of Mrs. Agnes 
Boyd Tanner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry C. Boyd, and Robert 
J. McMullen. The wedding will take place Hi is summer. 

WILLIAMS-RATJCL.IFFE. — The engagement is announced of Miss Muriel 
Williams, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Alleton Williams, and Wal- 
ter Radcliffe. The wedding will take place at the Williams home tn 
Berkeley this fall. 

WEDDINGS. 

ARQUES-l'AVIDSON.— Mis. May Arques, of San Francisco, and Bur- 
leigh Davidson, associate editor of "Lawyer and Banker" (magazine), 
were married at Santa Cruz on Wednesday, July 26th. Honeymoon at 
San Diego. The bride moves in art and literary circles. The couple 
will make their home at Claremont after the 1st. 

BARLOW-TIEDEMANN.— The wedding of Miss Maybelb- Bertha Barlow, 
daughter of Mr. and Mis. Allison Barlow, and Tudor Herman Alex- 
ander Tiedemann, will take place al Hie home of the bride's parents 
in Los Angeles on next Thursday evening. 

QHAPMAN-FOSS. — The wedding of Miss Dorothy Chapman and Benji 
rain S. Foss will take place on August S8d at Grace Cathedral. 

IIALEY-FOLGER. — The wedding of Miss Grace Haley and Roy S. Folger 

took place Wednesday morning at the home of the bride on Union 

street. 
HUNT-BAKER. — The wedding of Miss Natalie Hunt and Herbert Ross 

Baker will take place on Wednesday, August 9th, in St. Luke's 

Church. 
LVTTUN-WHITE.— The wedding of Miss Camille Lytton and Launce S. 

White took place at 6 o'clock Wednesday evening at the home of the 

bride In Leavenworth street. 
SIMPSON-HOUGH.— The wedding of Miss Amalia Simpson and William 

Hough will take place on September 9th at St. Luke's Episcopal 

Church. 
WINSTON-DAY.— The wedding of Miss Jane Chandler Winston and Wm. 

Day took place on Monday at Trinity Episcopal Church. 

LUNCHEONS. 

MEROU. — Consul Henri Merou gave a delightful luncheon recently in 

honor of Gerald Gapy. of Paris, who spent several days here en route 

fo the Orient. 
MILLER. — Miss Marian Miller entertained a group of friends at luncheon 

on Monday at the Laqunitas (' try Club. 

MOORE. — Mrs. C. B. T. Moore, wife of Rear-Admiral Moore, entertained 

at a luncheon in honor of Mrs. Henry T. Mayo recently. 
NEWHALL. — Mrs. William Mayo Newhall has been entertaining at a 

series of informal luncheons and bridge parties given at the Potter. 

TEAS. 
BROWN. — Mrs. Philip King Brown was hostess recently at a tea at the 

Town and Country Oub 'n honor of Mrs. Victor Morawetz. 
DOLLAR. — Mrs. Robert Dollar will entertain her friends at a tea on the 

afternoon of August 4th. 
KRAUTHOFF. — Mrs. Charles Kraulhoff was guest of honor at a tea at 

the Palace recently, at which Mrs. Richard Dunn entertained a num- 
ber of her mutual friends. 
SLOSS. — Mrs. Leon Sloss entertained at a tea at her home in Marin 

County Tuesday afternoon. 

DINNERS. 
BLISS. — General and Mrs. Tasker Bliss entertained at a dinner recently 

in honor of Colonel and Mrs. Von Schrader. 
HERTZ.- Mrs Louis Hertz was ln-stess at a dinner party recently at her 

home in Pierce Btreel for a score of friends, 

KRAUTHOFF.— Major an.i Mrs. Charles R. Krauthoff. entertained it a 

prettily appOln ted dinner at the Palace on Wedmsda; evening. 

MORRISON. — The M lases Morhson entertained at an elaborately ap- 
pointed dinner recently in San Jose in honor of Captain Frank A. 
Wilcox. U. S. A. 

W1SSKU. — Colonel and MrP. John Wisser entertained at a dinner at the 
Presidio recently, when they entertained eight gueats. 

CARDS. 

FORD. — Mrs. Alfred Ford was hostess at a bridge luncheon at Ross on 

Tuesday. 
WATERMAN. — Major Waterman, of the Presidio, gave a bridge party In 

honor of Mrs. McCormick. 

HOUSE PARTIES. 
BISSELL.— Mr. and Mrs. W, A. BlBSell, who have a villa at Lake Tahoe, 
have been entertaining several young peopl* as their guests. 

EGBERT.— Miss Dorothy Egbert will entertain the girls of the younger 

set at a series of house parties shortly. 
HENSIIA YY. — Mrs. William G. Hensl ■■<■.■■■ lias been entertaining a house 

party at Mira Vista, where she is passing the summer. 
SHARON. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Sharon entertained a group of young 

people over the week-end at their Menlo home. 
WHEELER. — Charles Wheeler, Jr., entertained a house party at the 

Wheeler country home, "The Bend," on the McCloud river. 



GARDEN PARTIES. 

shea. — Mrs. Will L. Shea is to be hostess at a large garden rete at her 
"Fair Oaks" country home to-day. 

MOTORING. 
COLEMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Coleman left on Wednesday In their 

automobile for Tahoe. 

GRANT.— Mr. and .Mrs. Joseph D. Grant, Mrs. Sam Knight, Mrs. Mount- 
ford Wilson and Mrs. J B. Crockett were members of a party that 
motored to Santa Cruz from Burltngame last week. 

MAMMON. — Mr. and Mrs. Wendell P. Hammon and Mr. and Mrs. Scott 
Hendricks have returned from their motor trip to the Santa Cruz 
Mountains. 

OXNARD. — Mr. and Mrs. Rob*-- it Oxnard ari back from their motor trip 
through the McCloud River country. 

PEASE. — Mr. and Mrs. R. n. Pease, Mr. and Mrs, Arthur B. Watson, 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Abbott have g ■ on an interesting motor trip 

as far as Portland. 

WORDEN.— Clinton E. Worden, Nelson Thome Shaw and some of their 

friends are en route to Tahoe by automoblll 
ARRIVALS. 

BENT. — Mrs. E. F. Bent lias returned to : i ion ■ "i Buchanan street. 

after a trip to Alia. 
BOWEN. — Colonel and Mrs. H. Bowen. who have been stationed at Fort 

McKinley for the last two years, arrived on the Sheridan this \v i 
CA I >\\'A I, A DBR.- Mr. and -Mrs, George Cadwalader have returned from 

a visit to Mrs. James Robinson and .Miss Elena Robinson ;n 

CHAPMAN. — Mr. and Mis. W. T. Chapman l Bernlce I larrell i h , 

turned from their honeymoon trip spent in Honolulu. 
DAVIS. — Mr. and Mrs, Georg Davifi and the Misses Ellse and Fanchon 

Davis have returned from Europe. 
DB PUB. — Miss Elva de Pue has returned from a visit with relatives In 

Chicago. 
DETRICK. — Mrs. Bowie Detrick, who has been at Ivy Wild in the Santa 

Cruz Mountains, is back for the season. 
FARQUHARSON. — Mrs. Charles Farquharson lias returned to her home 

in this city, after a visit in Los Angeles. 
FRANKLIN.— Dr. and Mrs. Walter Scott Franklin, who have been al 

Tallac, on Lake Tahoe, for the lust three weeks, again, 

FOLLIS. — Clarence Follis has reached here from New York. 
G-ARN3SAU.— Mr. and Mrs. James Gameau ti pretty i!;n 

the blisses Clemen ce and Frances al the Fairmont. 

GEISSLER. — Mrs. Arthur Gels lei and net children ur< here from Cht- 
o, visiting Mr. and Mrs. George a Moore at Ross. 

HOLMAN. — Alfred lloltnan has returned from a trip abroad. 

HTJSE.— Mr. and Mrs. Charles Huse have returned from a tour of the 

Orient, and are al the Fairmont. 
JENNINGS.— Mr. and Mrs. ETennen Jennings have returned from Lake 

Tahoe, and are guests at the Coleman home on California street. 
KEENEY. — Mrs. James Keeney and Miss Helen Keeney have returned 

from Castle Crag. 
KNIGHT, M rs. Samuel Knight, who baa been enjoying a visit at Del 

Monte, is again at her home at Burling 
laxsi>ale. — Philip M. Lansdale has returned from a trip to the San 

Joaquin Valley. 
LANGHORNE. — Miss Julia Langhome has returned after an outing in 

Santa Barbara, and is at h< r h .me m racific Avenue. 
LENT.— Mr. and Mrs. George H. Lent and Mr. and Mrs. Robi 

Hooker have returned from Tahoe. 
LENZ. — Mr. and Mrs, Hugo Frederick Lens (Genevieve Mersfelder) have 

returned from tin:- bone] and an U Will Valley. 

LOUGHBOROUGH.— Mrs, A. II. Loug ce, Miss Bes- 

sie Zane, are at the Fairmont after a visit with friends in the 

country. 
MASTEN.— Mrs. Joseph M. Masten. Miss EQugenle Mast.-n and Miss 

Kathleen Ma Uen haw returned i rom a delightful trip to Del Monte. 
McCRACK in. — Al rs. Alexandei McCrackln baa returned to her home In 

Paclfle Avenue, after a visit at Mare Island. 
McPHERSON.— William fcfcPhera las returned to town after a visit 

of several weeks in the southern part of the State. 
McNEAR, — Mrs. G. w. McNeai and tier daughter, Miss [Elizabeth B 

who have been touring the world for the pasl rear, have arrived from 

the Orient. 
MILLER. — Mrs. F. M. Miller and Miss Jean Miller are up from Fresno 

for an Indefinite stay. 
MORTON. — Mr. and Mrs Henry Morton will return on August 1st. after a 

year's trip abroad. 
NORTON. — Mrs. J. F. Norton and her daughter, Miss Florenee Norton, 

have returned from i lenvei . 
PXYNE. — Mrs. Theodore Payne, with her sore-, arrived in New York last 

Tuesday from Europe, where they havi spenl the last six months. 
PHELPS. — Mrs. Timothy Guy Phelps, who is passing the season at her 

country home at San Carlos, is spending this week in the city. 
POPE. — George A. Pope lias rejoined his family in San Mateo, after a 

visit of several weeks at Seattle. 
REE S.— Col. Thomas H. Rees and Mrs. Rees, of Washington, D. C, arc 

at the Fairmont. 
REQUA. — Mrs. Mark L. Requa and her family have returned from Mlra- 

mar, where they have been spending the summer. 



July 29, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



i l'. Mr. and Mrs. lUm [oying a visit from their son, 
cott Scott, who has 

SPRA< and .Miss I irnad from 

Quropi iimI are at their plantation In 

; ,iv.\N, Mr. and Mrs. Francis .i. Sullivan and theli daughter have 
returned fron tei I : tour abroad. 

TALBOT. ''■!■■ i ■■■ ■-' Talbol has been the ffuesl of Mlsa Ayte Josse- 

lyn at V700d 

timl< >W. Mrs. William Timlow and Miss Ehniry Timlow have reached 
. from Lakt I i and will vlali Mr. and Mrs. Harry Poetl al 

San Mateo. 
VAN S1CKLEN. — Miss DorotRy and Miss Hilda Van Slcklen have returned 

from a visit to Miss Harriet stone at Egbert Stone's country home on 

the Russian river. 
V<>x SCHROEDER.— Baroness von Schroeder is at the home of Mrs. 

Eleanor Martin, having come up from San Luis Obispo. 
WELLER. — Mrs. Charles Weller and Miss Anna Weller have returned 

to the city after a delightful visit in Northern California. 
WISMER. — Mother Wismer returned to town on Monday, after an outing 

in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 
WOOD. — Mrs. Seabury Wood and the Misses Veida and Lola Wood and 

Master Seabury Wood, are back from Tahoe. 

DEPARTURES. 

BAKER. — Mrs. Wakefield Baker, who has been at her home in Pacific 

Avenue for a few days, has returned to Castle Crag, where she is 

passing the summer. 
BEAYER. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick H. Beaver, Miss Isabelle Beaver and 

Miss Dora Winn will go to Tahoe for the first part of August. 
BID I HJB. — Col. Tohn Diddle, who has been stationed here for the last 

three years, left this week for Washington, D. C. 
CHIPMAN. — Dr. and Mrs. Ernest Dwight Chipman, accompanied by 

Miss Erna St. Goar, will sail shortly for Europe. 
COLBY. — Mrs. Saflord Colby has left for a tour of the Eastern States, 

where she will visit relatives for the next two or three months. 
COYLE. — Miss Angela Coyle has left for Los Angeles, where she will 

be the guest of Mis. John Martyn Haonek. 
DENNY. — Miss Esther Denny, who has been making a brief visit in town, 

has returned to Applegate, where Colonel and Mrs. Denny are spend- 
. ing the summer. 
DICKENS. — Captain and Mrs. Edmund Dickins left recently for the East. 
DTJTTON. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton will go to Honolulu shortly 

to visit the hitter's sister. Mrs. Harry Maefarlane. 
E WING. —Miss Grace Ewing, of New York, who arrived recently for a 

visit of a few months with her mother and sisters at their hi in 

Scott street, has gone to Los Angeles. 
FINNEGAN. — Miss Kathleen Flnnegan is soon to leave for an Eastern 

visit, and will extend her trip to Europe In the fall. 
frear. — Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Frear have gone to Southern California. 
HERMANN. — Mr. and Mrs. William Hermann and Miss Brna Hermann 

have left for the Yellows! mm, 
HULL. — Mr. and Mrs. Lytle Hull (Gertrud< Carroll), whose wedding look 

place last r ith, have gone East, and will spend several months at 

Tuxedo. 

KING. — Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Kins; hai i goi i to Inverness for a few weeks' 

outing before returning to theli home In Calaveras County. 
LANGHORNE.— Miss Julia Langhorne will leave for Colorado Springs 

on the 1st Of August, 

MANN.- Mi. and Mrs. Beth Mann have left foi Mendocino County. 

MORROW.— Mrs. w. C. Morrow left foi II re- 
main for a fori nighl 01 

O' LB ARY.— Captain Arthur < ►' i ieai > and Mrs, O'Learj will go to New 
York soon to reside. 

ROSS, Mi Geoi ■■- C Ross and hei son, Lee Ross oi I 

for Honolulu recently. 

SPRECI i I ■■ Mr. and Mrs John D. Sprecki anted bs Mr, and 

Mrs. .lark Spreckels and a part] oi frit rout 

in l he Sprecki 1 1 > acht. 

TEYis. Mrs, Will Tevls and hei " onnor, have 

be n In Now York, but sailed tins week for Europe. 

WTJBST. bflss i nick have 

visit with Miss >. iiin. 

INTIMATIONS. 

ABRAHAMS) »N UU Abrahamson onths 

as the guest of friends al New < 

AhKXAM C, O, Alexander and her daughter, Miss Harriet 

Alexander, were the guests ol Mr and Mrs, Moui over 

end. 
ANDBRTON Gi \nd-Mton was the guest of the Ward Bar- 

at their San Mateo home. 
A.SHB1 R* id Mrs. Thomas Q. ashburn have been 

■hiiul visit at X 

in-law is stationed. 

BABCOCK, Mr. and Mrs. William H 

they win i 

and Airs. Frederick H. Beaver, M and 

\\ inn it i 1 planning to spend the month of August al 
BERWIN Mrs Martin Berwln, New ! irfc Is visiting her slstei Mrs. 

l». 1.. M 
BLANC HARD Mrs M E a- Keating, who 

In London i to Paris. 

to Standing and Miss Hem li 

the summer at their home, ■"Cliff 

■ 

BR] Mrs. Bdws 

at Ui ountry hen and. 



Irs. Brodie and their youi 
the Victoria foi the 

BROOKS, Colonel and Mrs, .1 «' \\ 

Fontaine of Main, al I 

i !AR< m.an. Mr. and Mn Jan i .: , n are 

■ ■■ rig an o g at Tain"'. 

ERF M r, and M i s, Marcel Cerf ar< makh ,B Ivedere. 

CHAMBERLAIN, Mr, and Mrs, Selah Chamberlain are spending the 

summex a t Pali < take. 
CLARK.- Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Clark ai 

several weeks at Del Monte. 
CLARK.— Dr. and Mrs. John Rodget'S 'lark and Mr. and Mrs. Josiah 

i low oil have been visiting Weber Lake. 
COYLE.— Miss Angela Coyle is contemplating a visit with Mrs. M 

iioenke at Ian* home In Los Angeles. 
DAVIS, — Miss Sydney Davis Is en route to Belgium. 

DEWEY. — Miss Kate Haun Downy is spending the SU a in Kentucky. 

DOSCH. — Mr. and Mrs. Arno Dosch have taken a cottage In Berkeley. 

DRISCOLL. — Mrs. J. M. Drlscoll and Miss Verde ■•■ spending the week 

with the Thomas Driscolls at Burlingame. 
Dl-ilMER. — Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Delmer are at the Hotel Wolcott In New 

York. 
EASTERBROOK. — Mrs. D. E. Easterbrook is spending several days at 

Castle Crags Farm. 
EYRE. — Miss Mary Eyre, who returned from the Orient with Mr. and 

Mrs. Charles Baldwin, has been entertaining guests from town at 

Pair Oaks. 
GALLOIS. — John Gallois and Cyril Tobin were guests of friends ovei the 

week-end in San Mateo. 
GALLOIS. — Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Gallois and Miss Joanne Gallois are 

at Banff, British Columbia. 
GIRVIN. — Miss Lee Girvin has been entertaining her friend, Miss Xsa- 

bel Chase at her home at Palo Alto. 
GRAHAM. — William Miller Graham is en route to California, after spend- 
ing sevei'al months in London with Mrs. Graham, 
GREENWAY. — E. M. Greenway and Willard Barton were guests at 

Tahoe Tavern last week. 
HAYNE. — Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Hayne, who have been traveling in 
« Switzerland, have left for Paris. 
HEALY. — Mr. and Mrs. William H. Healy are enjoying an outing at Bart- 

lett Springs, after a sojourn at Del Monte. 
HENDERSON. — Robert Henderson spent the week-end at Poso Rubles. 
HEX I 'RICKSON. — Mr. and Mrs. Wffi, 1 iondri.kson, Jr., and their two 

sons, Alfred and William, are at Casa Del Rey, Santa Cruz. 
HEWITT. — Mr. and Mis. Dixwell Hewitt, as well as Miss Augusta Foute 

and Miss Innes Keeney, were the week-end guests of the Frederick 

Sharons at Menlo. 
HOLMES. — Mr. and Mrs. Howard Holmes, Mr. and Mrs. William D. Fen- 

n i more and Arthur Fenniniore are at the Hotel Belmont in New York. 

and will spend two weeks In the metropolis. 
HO* '-AN. — Mrs. William Arthur Hogan, formerlj Mai vol la Fitzglbbon, 

is visiting her parents, Dr. and Mrs. Gerald J. Fitzglbbon, 
HOPKINS.— E. w. Hopkins, with his daughter, Miss Florence Hopkins. 

and his niece, Miss Marion Zeile, is at Tahoe Tavern for 

weeks. 
hautican. — Mrs. Charles Conway Hartigan, wife of Ensign Hartlgan, 

is the guest of in i slstei Iflxs, Charles Norrls, In Now York, where 

she is being entertained Informally. 
J'OHNSON. — Mr. and Mrs nson have taken the Marsh cotl 

Mill Valley foi the remainder of tin- season. 
jones. — Miss Helen Jones an I al Santa 

Barbara, whei they are visltlnj Vti Flore I tenshaw. 

lane.— Mrs. J. R. Lane and Miss Otllla Lam have lolned the Tahoe 

colony for the remainder of the summer, 
LXMBAUGH. — Mr. and Mrs. William \ Llmbaugh and ire now 

living in th' li log cabin In Mill Valley. 

in al Del Monte, where 

the lati , Jr., is with 1 hem. 

(Continued to Page 21.) 



If the 

S T E I NWA Y 

Has a 
Reputation 
the Piano 
Merits it 

Sherman Ray & Go. 

Steinway iod Olhrr Pianos Player Piinos of all Grades 
M Talking Machines 
Sheet Music and Musical Merchandise 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
Fourteenth and Clay Sts., Oakland 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 



SAN FRANCISCO LIFE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

HOME OFFICE: 57 POST STREET, 7th Floor 
San Francisco 

JOHN A. KOSTER. President 

THE BEST POLICIES ON EARTH TO SELL 

THE BEST MEN WANTED TO SELL THEM 

THE BEST CONTRACTS TO THE BEST MEN 

SEE OUR LIST OF STOCKHOLDERS 

Address the Company 
CATHCART MACGURN, / ssl. General Manager and Director of Agencies 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $1,500,000 



Assets, $8,150,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 
San Francisco, California. 



Cash Capital, J400.000 



Cash Assets, Jl. 117.480.03 



Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass, Personal Accident 
insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurer; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man, W. E. Dean, F. P. Deering, E. F. Green, James K. Mofiltt, J. W. 
Phillips, Henry Rosenfeld. Adolph A. Son. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 416 Montgomery St. 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000 

Surplus to Policyholders 3,060,06» 

Total AsseU 7,478.441 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING, 
Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 





British and Foreign 


Marine Insurance Co. 


Ltd. 




OF 


LIVERPOOL. 












BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 




350 


California Street. 


Sa 


n Franclico 



The Weft CoasT: Life Insurance Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid insurance 
laws of California, Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Geo. E. Billings Roy C. Ward Jimes K. Polk 



J. C. Meussdorffer James W. Dean 



Geo. E. Billings Co. 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED 
312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 2283 

Home Phone C 2899 




INSVMCEi 




There are two women in the San Francisco Bay region who 
have a million each of life insurance on their lives. It is under- 
stood that the two largest policies are on the lives of William 
H. Crocker, the banker, and Banker I. W. Hellman, each having 
$1,500,000. William B. Bourne, the water and mine magnate, 
is said to be in the million class in this respect. The same is 
said to be true of Milo Potter, who has the Potter Hotel at Santa 
Barbara. There are some half million risks in California, and a 
large number between this figure and the $100,000 mark. A 
woman's life insurance solicitor has recently placed two of the 
latter on wealthy young men who have just entered the class of 

Benedicts. 

* • * 

Through a verdict brought in the Superior Court of Pasadena, 
Cal., a fine point of law was determined. F. E. Fisher bought 
a piano on the installment plan. In the installment agreement 
it was stipulated that the purchaser must insure the instrument 
against fire. The piano house accepted an existing policy as 
satisfactory, saying that it would cover on the piano. When 
the fire came, the piano house claimed the title of the piano to 
be with them, and the company refused to pay Fisher for prop- 
erty owned by another, and the piano house sued Fisher for the 
balance of the payments. A jury brought in a verdict against 

the music house, in Fisher's favor. 

* * * 

Motions for new trials have been made in the case of W. J. 
O'Neil against the Union Assurance and the Law Union and 
Rock for $11,000. The case is peculiar. The companies base 
•their refusal to honor the insurance policies on the ground that 
O'Neil stored more gasoline in the building than the policies 
permitted. It developed at the trials that the wrong riders re- 
garding the storage of gasoline had been attached to the policies 
— but the companies claimed that O'Neil knew how much gaso- 
line he could store under the contract without regard to the 

rider. The juries in both cases found for plaintiff. 

* * » 

For the 500,000 gallon steel tank which will hold the head- 
waters and supply the constant pressure through the ninety 
miles of the San Francisco auxiliary fire protection system, 
the Board of Works has received a second lot of bids, the low- 
est more than cutting in two the lowest offer first made. The 
tank will be connected with the double 10,000,000 gallon Twin 
Peaks reservoirs as its reserve supply, and from its elevation 
at Ashbury and Seventeenth streets will give a minimum of 
300 pounds pressure throughout the network of pipes leading 
down from it and reaching from Devisadero street to the water- 
front. 

* * » 

At the semi-annual meeting of the Oakland Board of Fire 
Insurance Agents, the proceedings concluded with a dinner. 
An amendment to the by-laws was decided upon, increasing the 
executive committee to seven members. The officers elected for 



Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company of California 

Insure Against LOSS OF INCOME, EARNING POWER, OR SALARY 




Manager Accident Department 



SHREVE BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO 



The Home Insurance Company, New York 



Organized 1853. 



Cash Capital, $3, 000,000 



Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere In United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss 
by Are. Automobile insurance. Indemnity for loss of rental income by 
fire. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent, J. J. SHEAHAN, Ass't General Agent. 

324 Sansome Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



July 29, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



the ensuing term were: President, F. F. Porter; vice-president, 
Joseph P. Rohrbach ; secretary, C. Fred Burks ; treasurer, E. H. 
McCandlish. The attendance numbered about forty, and much 
interest was taken in the proceedings. 

* * f 

After numerous attempts, running over a period of many 
months, a decided attempt has been made to reorganize the 
State association of local fire insurance agents, the reason be- 
ing the necessity for action against the bad practices that have 
crept into the business. It is hoped to get better co-operation 
from the Denver agents who are not members of the Fire In- 
surance Exchange. 

* * * 

Second Assistant Fire Chief Goodrich, of Fresno, Cal., who 
has special charge of the statistical work of the city fire de- 
partment, made his first semi-annual report for the fiscal year 
on Monday, showing that there have been ninety-three alarms 
of fire since the first of the year entailing a loss of $49,243, on 
which there was insurance of $26,526. In all but seven cases 
the fire was confined to the buildings in which it originated. 

* * * 

At a meeting held in Oakland, Cal., forty subscribers of the 
Financial Underwriters, who were made defendants in a suit 
for $150,000 by Ralph B. Greensfelder, former president of the 
corporation, decided to prosecute a cross-suit to annul their 
subscriptions, charging Greensfelder with fraud and obtaining 
money under false pretenses. 

* * * 

• The Sunset Assurance Association has been organized at 
Santa Barbara, Cal., to write accident and health insurance "at 
a rjopular price," and will take up life and endowment insurance 
later. 

* * * 

J. B. Monnette, an insurance solicitor charged with passing 
leged embezzlement of $150 from an insurance company. The 
charge will be reduced to obtaining money under false pre- 
tenses, it is. said, and that even that charge will not hold for 
part of the money. 

J. Harry Wilson, of Ukiah, Cal., has been arrested on the 
charge of having attempted to hire a man to fire his store in 
order that he might obtain the insurance on stock. The man 
backed out, and Wilson is alleged to have tackled the job him- 
self. 

At a meeting of the board of directors of the Fireman's Fund 
Insurance Company a dividend of $3 per share for the three 
months ending June 30th was declared to stockholders, payable 
on July 25th. 

J. B. Monette, an insurance solicitor charged with passing 
spurious checks on a hotel in Sacramento, has been located at 
Los Angeles, and will be taken north for trial. 

B. W. Clemments has been appointed agency organizer for 
the Western States Life of San Francisco, with headquarters 
at Los Angeles. 

The scheme to put the United States Postal Insurance Cor- 
poration, of Denver, op its feet, will be abandoned after all but 
eleven thousand five hundred of the eighty thousand collected 
has been expended for promotion expenses. 

William B. White has resigned the California State agency 
of the New World Life, of Washington, and E. F. McGraw has 
been given the general agency for California, Arizona, Ne- 
vada and the Hawaiian Islands. White has been with the com- 
pany a year. 

License has been granted to the General Fire of Paris, 
France, to extend its operations to the State of Washington. 



San Francisco announces a revival of the practice of 

elocution and oral expression in its public schools. To which 
we all say amen. There is little doubt that with the introduc- 
tion of innumerable fads into the daily work of the student has 
come a letting go of much that was of incalculable value in the 
curriculum of twenty-five years ago. The weekly spell-downs, 
the daily sing-song repetition of the multiplication table and 
the Friday afternoon "piece speaking" were doubtless very 
primitive and crude, but under that much despised system it 
was a rare thing to find a high school graduate who was not 
sure of himself on the spelling of the simplest words and who 
could not express himself grammatically, whereas the reverse 
is now the fact. — Buffalo Truth. 



Dr. Lyon's 

PERFECT 

Tooth Powder 

neutralizes the destructive acids of 
the mouth — cleanses, preserves and beau- 
tifies the teeth, and imparts purity 
and fragrance to the breath. 



5% per month 

SAVED on the investment by 

buying the 

ALASKA REFRIGERATOR 

900,000 SOLD SINCE 1878 

We have a Test Refrigerator to prove what we 
claim for it. Please call and see it. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 



557-563 Market Street 



San Francisco 



D. C. HEGER 
Shirts and Underwear 



TO ORDER 

The Acme of 
QUALITY 

and 

STYLE 



243 KEARNY STREET Phone Douglas 3641 



Your stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY 
Let us guide you in your selections 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importera of and Dealers in 
THE HIGHEST CLASS PAPRR FOR OFFICE STATIONERY 
Battery and Jackson Sta. San Francisco. Cal 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



1400 to 1460 Fourth. St.. Son Francisco. Telephone Market 3014 
Private ELxch&rjjre Connecting all Department* 



DAKE'S PRESS CLIPPING BUREAU 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

432 S. Main Street 
Phone F 1289; Main 4133 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

12 Qeary Street 

Phone Kearny 1440 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 



THUGGERY BY UNION PICKETS. 

Oakland had another display last Wednesday of the thug- 
gery practiced by the pickets employed by the union lumber 
drivers in their efforts to compel "recognition of the union." 

Since the Sunset Lumber Company of that city announced 
its intention to conduct its own business in its own way and to 
employ the men that it saw fit, the union men have resorted to 
every form of tactics to bulldoze the company and cow its em- 
ployees. The "peaceful picketing," about which we hear so 
much, has been about as lawless as can be imagined. 

It was bad enough, and unlawful enough, when the union bull- 
dozers followed the company's wagons around in buggies bear- 
ing obnoxious signs, but when the union men found that this 
did not deter the company's activities, the more forcible meth- 
ods of the thug were resorted to, with a view of injuring the 
lumber company in its legitimate business. 

This time the pickets got their just deserts. When they at- 
tacked the non-union drivers and began pistol shooting, the 
non-union men fired back, with the result that two of the pickets 
were hit. 

When cowardly politicians refuse to protect citizens and their 
employees in their proper work, it is only right that the latter 
should protect themselves against the plug-uglies who annoy 
and attack them. The Sunset Company has asked protection 
against the riotous pickets, but it has been either inadequate or 
lacking altogether. Self-defense demands personal action, as 
in this case. 

There is no difficulty about the "recognition" of the unions. 
They are recognized as an organized band of lawbreakers, who 
have no regard whatever for the rights of others, and are a law 
unto themselves. 



VICTORY FOR THE PERES CHARTREUX. 

A notable victory has been won in the United States Supreme 
Court by the Carthusian monks — Peres Chartreux — in their 
legal combat witn the Cusenier Company, a New York corpora- 
tion, to prevent the latter from using the trade mark and other 
features of the famous product of the monks, the popular char- 
treuse liqueur. 

After the monks were forcibly removed from their monastery 
near Voiron, in the department of Isere, in France, the monks 
carried their whole manufacturing plant, as well as the secret 
of making the delightful liqueur, to Tarragona, Spain, where 
they have continued to produce the beverage. Following this, 
parties in France undertook to manufacture another liqueur in 
imitation of the original, which is made only by the Carthusian 
monks. As a result, the monks instituted proceedings to prevent 
the sale of the imitation under the name they had made famous 
for so many years. 

After much litigation, the monks have at last been upheld by 
the highest court in the United States, and will henceforth be 
freed from the annoyance of having an imitation masquerading 
under the name of their famous product. 



McDEVITT THE UNTERRIFIED. 

The other day I heard McDevitt, the socialist candidate for 
Mayor, speak. He is a prepossessing man with an infinite gift 
of speech, and he uses it well. He is a most convincing, ear- 
nest speaker, and this accounts for the great strides he has 
made. He recognizes clearly that McCarthy cannot win. He 
seems to see that McCarthy's attitude in lifting the lid has alien- 
ated many of the labor element. There is no doubt as to the 
militancy of McDevitt, but it is not of the objectionable kind. 
The socialists came rear stealing the McCarthy club in the 
thirty-ninth the other night. There was a near riot. The Mc- 
Carthy supporters finally routed the socialists by rough-neck 
tactics. McCarthy's dress-suit habits, his magnificent display 
of wealth, his hobnobbing with the more obnoxious of the man- 
agers of big business, and the fact that it is known that some 
of the biggest and most conscienceless of the operators are 
backing him. which is adding to the socialists' column against 
him. 



For Sale. — 1910 Winton Automobile. Perfect condition; 

fully equipped. Warner Speedometer; top; glass front; clock; 
tire irons; trunk rack; Prest-o-Lite tank; electric and oil lamps; 
two horns — bulb and electric; two tire covers; two extra tires; 
two extra tubes. Address, Owner, 21 Sutter Street. 'Phone 
Kearny 3594. 



THE GRAVES OF A HOUSEHOLD. 

They grew in beauty side by side, 

They filled one home with glee, 
Their graves are severed far and wide, 

By mount, and stream and sea. 
The same fond mother bent at night 

O'er each fair sleeping brow, 
She had each folded flower in sight — 

Where are those dreamers now? 

One midst the forests of the West, 

By a dark stream is laid: 
The Indian knows his place of rest 

Far in the cedar shade. 
The sea, the blue lone sea, hath one, 

He lies where pearls lie deep, 
He was the loved of all, yet none 

O'er his low bed may weep. 

One sleeps where southern vines are drest 

Above the noble slain; 
He wrapt his colors round his breast 

On a blood-red field of Spain. 
And one — o'er her the myrtle showers 

Its leaves, by soft winds fanned ; 
She faded midst Italian flowers, 

The last of that bright band. 

And parted thus, they rest — who played 

Beneath the same green tree, 
Whose voices mingled as they prayed 

Around one parent knee! 
They that with smiles lit up the hall, 

And cheered with song the hearth — 
Alas for love, if thou wert all, 

And nought beyond, oh earth! 

— Felicia Hemans in Truth. 



Mrs. Anna Von Meyerinck will leave for a short Alaskan 

trip on August 1st, and will make two stops on the way for con- 
certizing. Mrs. Ward Esterly will have charge of the Von 
Meyerinck studio during her absence, teaching all day Tuesdays 
and Fridays, while Miss Lillian Lineer will teach on Mondays 
and Wednesdays from 2 to 5 p. m. Mrs. Von Meyerinck will re- 
turn on September 5th. 



— The chief and most dangerous hazard of the moving pic- 
ture shows is that to the optic nerve. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 




50 YEARS OF 

UNPRECEDENTED POPULARITY 
IS THE INVINCIBLE RECORD OF 

HUNTER WHISKEY 



Guaranteed under the Pure Food Law 



Sold at all flrEt-cla9i> cafes and by Jobbers. 
WE LANAHAN & SON, Baltimore, Md. 



July 29, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



LARGEST COAST OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND WOMEN 



'WHERE QUALITY COSTS LITTLE 
OZ1KI AND COR WASHINGTON i cor.market cam CDAUnvn 
UHIVLANU ind IIBSTS . I and fOUBTH STS ~>A" FRANCISCO 







Women's 
Tailored 

Suits 
Made to 

Order 

$25 and Up 

A new department 
has been recently add- 
ed in which we make 
to measure WOMEN'S 
TAILORED SUITS. 

These are made on 
our own premises, by 
skilled designers and 
experienced operators. 
They are lined with 
Skinner's satin, and 
the FIT, the WORK- 
MANSHIP and FIN- 
ISH ARE GUARAN- 
TEED SATISFAC- 
TORY. 

A wonderful range 
of new Fall materials 
In plain and novelty 
weaves, and in all the 
desirable colorings 

from which to choose, 
is ready. And the 
prices which we 

charge will allow you 
a considerable saving 
over any other repu- 
table tailor shop In 
San Francisco. 

We shall be pleased 
to show you new Fall 
materials, and to h^ve 
your order for your 
Fall Suit. 

New 
Motor Coats 

A splendid new col- 
lection of Coats for 
motor purposes Is 
ready now. 

A wonderful lot of 
nobby styles, In fancy 
materials, most of 
them double-faced and 
many of them In the 
soft, thick, "warmth 
without weight" fab- 
rics. 

Prices on trv se coats 
are extremely moder- 
ate, considering the 
style, workmanship 

and material. And for 
$20. $25 and $30 you 
will get styles which 
will express your per- 
sonality in charming 
fashion. 

See these the next 
time you are down- 
town. 



S®duH ffin&i IP®irs®ffii<!!iH fltafi® 



(Continued from Page 17.) 



ORMICK.— Mrs, K. O, McCormicl :-. are at 

i 'aao Etoblt 
\i cKINSTRY. — ! Mi ss Laura tfcKln try, who baa I i 

Robles for a sui ■ t visit., has returned to her hoi 

MORTON.— Mr. aiul Mrs Henry Morton will return August 1st. . 

year's travel abroad. 
vlacDONALD. — Mr. and Mrs. Allan MacDonald arc visiting the latter'a 

parents, Col. and Mis. John C. Klrkpatrlck. 
.MILLER. — Miss Mary Ashe Miller will visit the Sperrys at Alta during 

August. 
. i :\\ "i 1ALL. — Mr. and Mrs. George Aimer Newhall will spend August and 

September at Del Monte. 
ORR, — Mr. and Mrs. James W. Orr, with their daughter, Florence, arc 

making a stay of several weeks In the southern part of the State. 
I'OPE, — Mrs. George A. Pope is still at Tahoc, but plans to return about 

the middle of August. 
POTTER. — Mrs. MUo Potter and her daughter, Miss Nina Jones, passed 

through San Francisco en route to Santa Barbara from the East, 

where they have spent several months in travel. 
PRESTON. — Mr, and Mrs. Frank Preston are planning to make their 

home for a time with Mrs. Edgar Preston at Menlo. 
PRINGLE. — Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Pringle are summering at the Peninsula 

Hotel. 
RUTHERFORD. — Alexander Rutherford has been visiting his uncle, 

Lewis Hanchett. and spent several days of last week at Del Monti 
REDDING. — Joseph D. Redding, A. P. Redding. Dr. D. P. Fredericks and 

W. S. Johnson, of the Claremont Country Club, have enjoyed an out- 
ing on the golf links at Del Monte. 
ROSS. — Judge and Mrs. Erskine M. Ross are en route from Europe to 

this coast. 
SHERWOOD. — Mr. and Mrs. John Dickinson Sherwood and Mr. and Mrs. 

Gay Lombard are enjoying a yachting trip off the Atlantic coast. 
SMITH. — Mrs. Eleanor Hyde-Smith has been the guest of her daughter, 

Mrs. Baldwin Wood, at the Peninsula for the last week. 
SPERRY. — Mrs. Horace Sperry lias closed her home In Octavia street, 

and has taken a house in Mill Valley for the next two months. 
STILLMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Stillman have written interestingly 

of their stay in Paris, where they are established in the James Still- 
man residence for several months. 
STONEY. — Mrs. George Rtoney. with Miss Katherlne and Miss Helena 

Stoney, are at Del Monte. 
STOTT. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Van Deventer Stotl are at the Potter In 

Santa Barbara, where they will remain a month. 
STOW. — Mrs. Sherman Stow and hi I I &1 StOTB Ealancl, 

are still in Italy, but will i toi America the first of September. 
si .i.i.iVAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Sullivan will arrive here within the 

fortnight, being due in New york within the coming we< k. 
TO WNJSJ.— Mrs, A. N. Towne and her daughter, vn- Clinton Worden, are 

al months at Tain" 1 ivern 
VINCENT. — Mr. ancl Mrs. Germain* 

of the i reet. 

W13LLER.— Judge and I4n i Laughter, .Miss 

Anna Well 

will remain for the n n tain de 

WILSON— M ! of Mr. 

and Mrs. Cluff it (heir homi I bus 

band in t ! « . 
\ i ii i Weill has gone to m Spas from Paris, and 

will remain until September. 
WHITE.— Mis. I.ov.ll White has retu country homo, the 

Arches, in Mill Valley, after a visit 01 ■ in town. 

WHITTLE.— Mre. A. M. Whittle and the Ml Whittle, 

of Mill v.' nth. 

WILSH1 tfra. William a and Miss Doris Wil- 

li Mill Vail. 



BEAUTIFUL COUNTR) OPENED UP. 

Beginning next Tuesday, August 1st, the Northwestern 
Pacific Railroad will add another to the beautiful regions it 
makes easy of access over its route. 

This will be the first fourteen miles of the extension of the 
main line north of Willits. That distance along the extension 
to Eureka has been completed, and trains will be running 
regularly upon it on the date named. The station at the end of 
this stretch will be called Longvale, being at the junction of the 
Little Lake outlet and Long Valley, a charming region, full of 
scenic beauty and well stocked with fish and game. 

From Longvale, an auto stage line will run, over the new 
county road, to Laytonville, Cummings and points farther 
north. This is a region almost unknown to the average tourist 
and outer, and is one of the most alluring in the State to camper 
and hunter, as well as to the settler. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 




New York 
Financial Outlook 



President Taft has finally got 
through the Senate, Canadian Reci- 
procity, his pet bill, and signed it. 
As Reciprocity had been discounted, 
its passage did not have any influence on the stock market. 

The Moroccan situation has been the principal cause for 
alarm during the last few days, and there have been some very 
good reactions in stocks. Also the decision of the Interstate 
Commerce Commission in regard to the long and short haul 
clause, which caused some short selling. However, the market 
has rebounded in every instance with great rapidity. Lehigh 
Valley and Redding have shown particular strength, and will 
undoubtedly sell much higher. 

The Steel earnings are also considered good, but we under- 
stand that the present and prospective earnings show marked 
improvement and reflect much better general business condi- 
tions than when the figures of the steel corporation were com- 
puted. 

As stated in previous issues, stocks can still be safely bought 
on every reaction. The public has not yet got the stocks, and 
until they do, the trend of prices will unquestionably be up- 
ward. We again advise purchase of all good standard stocks. 
The further decline in grain and cotton indicates satisfactory 
conditions. There is absolutely nothing except the Moroccan 
situation which stands in the way of the continuation of this 
bull market. — F. Thieriot, Resident Partner Ehrich & Company, 
409 Pine street, San Francisco. 



Superintendent of the Central California Division, and will 
have his offices in future in Oakland. N. K. Lockwood, who 
was formerly route agent at Stockton, has been made Superin- 
tendent of the Northern California Division. 

The Bay Terminal Service, the Central California Division, 
and the Oregon, Puget Sound and Alaska- Yukon Division, are 
included in the Northwestern Department of the Wells-Fargo, 
which will be in charge of Andrew Christeson, Vice-President 
and General Manager of San Francisco. 

The new appointments will go into effect on August 1st. 



A notable event in local commercial 
Wells-Fargo annals was the announcement of a 

Reorganization. radical reorganization of the Wells- 

Fargo Express Company, involving 
wide changes in personnel and redistribution of the various de- 
partments of the company. 

William Sproule, formerly of the Southern Pacific Company, 
later traffic manager of the Guggenheim Smelter interests, and 
elected last November to the Wells-Fargo presidency, has 
effected the reorganization along lines similar to the organiza- 
tion of the Southern Pacific Company. Instead of having three 
departments — the Atlantic, the Central and the Pacific — there 
will henceforth be eight departments — the Greater New York, 
the Chicago, the Eastern, the Northern, the Central, the South- 
ern, the Southwestern and the Northwestern, the latter embrac- 
ing Alaska and the Yukon region. 

B. H. River has been made treasurer of the reorganized com- 
pany. Richard Burr has been promoted to Comptroller. E. E. 
Honn, formerly city superintendent in San Francisco, has been 
made General Auditor. Honn, like the other general officers, 
will have headquarters with President Sproule in New York. 

C. W. Stockton has been made counsel on commerce and 
taxes. J. D. Ludlow has been made General Traffic Manager. 

C. F. Graham has been made Traffic Manager in San Fran- 
cisco. D. T. Mervine has been made General Superintendent 
of Transportation, and will have his headquarters at Chicago. 
W. E. Scott receives the post of Superintendent of Money Or- 
ders. W. W. Fuller, who has been purchasing agent at San 
Francisco, has been promoted to General Purchasing Agent and 
transferred to Chicago. 

Twenty new appointments are announced in the Eastern, 
Northern and Central departments. In the Southern depart- 
ment, the General Superintendent of which is O. J. Peterson, 
with offices at St. Louis, C. N. Campbell, formerly General 
Agent at Los Angeles, has been made Superintendent at San 
Antonio, Texas. E. R. Jones, who was formerly General Man- 
ager in Mexico, has been made General Superintendent of the 
Southwestern Department, with headquarters at Los Angeles. 
J. F. Baker, who has been General Agent at Oakland, has been 
made Superintendent of the Southern California division and 
transferred to Los Angeles. 

T. A. Woods, who was formerly Superintendent of the South- 
western Division, with offices in San Francisco, has been made 



High Finance. 



It is announced that the Supervisors 
of San Francisco will deliver to Wil- 
liam Ham Hall and his associates of 
the Tuolumne Water and Power Company $652,000 in water 
supply bonds in payment for the Lake Eleanor and Cherry 
Creek properties of Hall's corporation, and the water rights and 
realty in question will be turned over to the municipality. A 
report on the agreement reached will be made to the Super- 
visors on Monday, and it is expected that they will at once 
authorize the conclusion of the negotiations. 

This action, if taken, will be "high finance" well exemplified. 
No man doing business for himself, not even a member of the 
Supervisors, would for one moment consider a proposition 
of paying out $652,000 for property which is in litigation, with 
a guarantee of a refund of only $50,000. This action will 
leave Ham Hall and associates a balance of $602,000 to the 
good should the city lose. The large banking and land holding 
interests of San Francisco are certainly careless in protecting 
their bank accounts when they sit idly by and do not protest 
against such an action as is now liable to pass through the 
Board of Supervisors. A deposit of $50,000 to protect $652,000 
is high finance indeed, especially in face of the fact that the 
United States Government is yet to be heard from, and may 
not grant this city the Lake Eleanor privileges. Should San 
Francisco be deprived of these rights, even though the Cherry 
Creek properties are delivered with a clear title, all of this 
money will be lost, as the lands alone, without Lake Eleanor, 
are suitable only for grazing purposes. It is the duty of our best 
citizens to protest against the proposed action by the Super- 
visors. We hope somebody will — and we also hope that there 
will be found at least one Supervisor who will have the courage 
to express himself on the lines set forth in this article. 

Here is an opportunity for the Civic League and the Mer- 
chants' Association to do some good, and prove to the public 
that their organizations are working for the best interests of 
San Francisco. 



EHRICH & COMPANY 

409 PINE STREET 

Members New York Stock Exchange 

Foreigrn Correspondents 

Securities Bought and Sold on Commission 

STOCKS, BONDS, COTTON AND GRAIN 

Private W ire Chicago — New York 

FERDINAND THIERIOT, Resident Partner 

Telephones: Suiter 2170 Home C 6630 San Francisco 



BONDS 

Established 1858 

SUTR.O & CO. Investment Brokers 

412 Montgomery Street San Francisco 

Members Slock and Bond Exchange Circular on request 



BISHOP & ELY 

630 Security Building Los Angeles, Cal. 



SCIENTIFIC TREE 
SURGERY 



Expert Tree Work by Trained Men 
CALIFORNIA OAKS A SPECIALTY 



Branch Office 



San Mateo, Cal 



July 29, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



The following, published in "Rub- 
Carter West Again. ber and Oil," a London financial 
paper of high standing, shows how 
much success Victor Carter West is having in selling the stock 
of the California Oil Fields, Limited, which he cannot sell in 
California. The "fields" are supposed to be in Petaluma. 
"Rubber and Oil" says : 

"By means of a flaming full-page advertisement in the 
Financial News last week, the Debenture Investment Trust, 
Limited, announced to the world that they 'have obtained a 
block of vendor shares' in the Consolidated Oilfields of Cali- 
fornia, Limited, which they are now selling at the 'very low 
price' of 5s. per share, payable by installments. Mr. V. Carter 
West, who was the promoter, and is now the chairman of the 
Board of this California wild-cat company, has more than once 
disclaimed any knowledge of various agencies which have been 
engaged from time to time in peddling out its shares. He can 
hardly do this in the present case. To all intents and purposes 
the Debenture Investment Trust is Mr. West himself, and I 
should not recommend anybody to relieve him of the shares it 
has obtained. 

"Mr. Victor Carter West, we understand, is abroad trying to 
raise the wind. Financial assistance failed him in the city. He 
has not been able to put up the £300 as security for the cost of 
the action for libel he was to bring against 'Rubber and Oil;' 
nor do we think he will meet with any success (we sincerely 
hope he will not) in his recent attempt to palm off his worthless 
shares at 50 per cent discount in the Consolidated Oilfields of 
California, Limited, against which a warning is given to our 
readers in another column. This financial charlatan should be 
suppressed, as the public has been entrapped too often by his 
snares. Those who create pitfalls for the investor by active 
misrepresentation or passively by material omissions resulting 
in false impressions should be dealt with by the legislature, and 
their victims entitled to restitution." 



A Record-Break i no 
Financial Year. 



West Operates 
in Germany. 



The so-called "Major" Victor Carter 
West, having been thoroughly dis- 
credited in California, and having 
met with exposure in England, has 
seemingly transferred his activities to Germany, where the 
police are after him. The following despatch to the Chronicle, 
of this city, speaks for itself: 

"Berlin, July 21st. — The police of this city are looking for a 
bogus American 'Major' Victor Carter West, who is wanted on 
a charge of swindling. The 'Major' founded the 'Consolidated 
Oil Fields of California,' and unloaded $10,000 worth of stock 
on victims in the Rhineland. He is believed to be identified 
with 'Otto Strauss,' another alleged swindler. Engineer Wm. 
Birck has been arrested on suspicion of being an accomplice 
of the 'Major.' " 

Is it necessary to give any further warning against this wild- 
catter, except to watch for him under some other name ? 



The Range 16 Oil Company, Valle- 
California Oil Fields, citos field, is down 1600 feet, and 
has a good showing of oil and gas. 
The property adjoins that of the Sussex, which recently struck 
the oil sand at 1700 feet. This well is now being cemented, 
and will be finished within a couple of weeks. The strike is 
better than 32 gravity oil, and proves that the experts of the 
Geological Survey were right when they announced that oil 
would be found in this district in commercial quantities. 

The Associated Oil Company is moving an average of 120,000 
barrels of agency oil a month out of the Coalinga field. This 
gives about 470,000 barrels for July, which will soon enable the 
small companies to resume operating. 

The discovery of oil near Point Richmond has been verified. 

The Liberty and Puritan Oil Companies, operating on Sul- 
phur Mountain, Ventura County, and the Portland, Kern County, 
near the river, have been merged into the Combined Oil Com- 
pany. 

Machinery has arrived at Tucson for exploration purposes. 

An oil seepage in the desert near San Bernardino is attracting 
attention. 

The Standard Oil Company is preparing to spend millions 
in the Whittier field for development purposes. 



Financial statistics for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1911, show that 
the year was one of remarkable 
prosperity for the United States. 
With a surplus of $33,000,000 in the national treasury, $1,800,- 
000,000 cash in the treasury vaults, bumper crops and a splen- 
did national credit, as shown by the sale of 3 per cent Panama 
Canal bonds to the extent of $50,000,000, it can be seen that 
this country is on the crest of general prosperity. The cash re- 
serve in the treasury is the largest on record, and the exports, 
valued at $2,057,000,000, exceed the previous high-water mark 
of 1906-7 by $177,000,000. 

The cotton crop exceeds the average of the past ten years by 
8.2 per cent, estimates placing the number of bales at $14,425,- 
000. against the next largest crop of 13,678,954 in 1904. 

Although the United States has only about 5 per cent of the 
world's population, it produces 20 per cent of the world's 
wheat, 22 per cent of its gold, 33 per cent of its coal, 35 per cent 
of its manufactures, 38 per cent of its silver, 40 per cent of its 
pig iron, 42 per cent of its steel, 55 per cent of its copper, 60 
per cent of its petroleum, 70 per cent of its cotton, and 80 per 
cent of its corn. Its aggregate wealth, which is approximately 
$130,000,000,000, is as great as that of the United Kingdom 
and France, its two nearest rivals. 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society. 



From reports received, the German 
Savings and Loan Society of this 
city, commonly known as "The Ger- 
man Bank," is enjoying even more 
than its share of prevailing banking prosperity. This is not un- 
natural, in view of this bank's conservative policies and finan- 
cial shrewdness in its investments and manner of conducting its 
business. The following excellent showing was made by the 
German Bank at the end of the last fiscal year, June 30, 1911 : 
Guaranteed capital, $1,200,00; capital actually paid-up in 
cash, $1,000,000; reserve and contingent funds, $1,605,792.68; 
employees' pension fund, $113,473.47; deposits June 30, 1911, 
$44,567,705.83; total assets, $47,173,498.51. 



Private Wire-New York. Chicago 


Western Union Code 


J.C. 


WILSON 


t New York Slock Exchange 
Member < Chicago Board of Trade 

' The Stock and Bond Exchange, S. F. 


Main Office 


Branch Office* 


MILLS BUILDING 


— 


Sao Franciaco 


PALACE HOTEL 


— 


(Main Corridor) San Francisco 


Correspondents 


HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 


HARRIS. WINTHROP & CO. 


Los Aogeles. Cal. 


New York, Chicago. London and Paris 



OAKLAND RESIDENCE EOR SALE— $6,000. 

Modern two-story house, in first-class condition, of ten rooms 
and bath, situated on corner lot, size 80x120, on top of sightly 
hill, with view of bay and city of San Francisco. Good barn, 
house and yard for chickens, vegetable garden, large berry ar- 
bor and a few young fruit trees. One block to car line direct to 
Broadway in fifteen minutes ; also direct to Idora Park and Uni- 
versity of California. One hour trip to San Francisco. 

Address: 1603 19th Avenue. Oakland, Cal. 




24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 




womwi 



c^s^sa^^^am^. 






Licenses were issued to the following new automobile ouners 
in San Francisco and vicinity during the week ending July 22 : 

SDTRO, MARION, 806 Mm. Saw Bans Bide., S. P Cartercar 

VAN SICKLEN, F. W., 40 Spear St., S. F Chalmers 

MAUSER. CHAS., Haywsrds Res 

BARBIER, II. F., K.anvoud Rambler 

STANDARD < 'IT. CO., 1st and Market .St.. S F Overland 

BRENNER, G., 2286 Jackson St., S. F Hupp 

STEELE, F. •'.. Petaluma Bulck 

WALLS, c. B., Petaluma Buleh 

ANDERSON, DR. I: W., Stewart Hotel, s. F Packard 

DWYER. J. •.. 379 So. 8th Si.. .San Jose Maxwell 

wassim. .i. p.. Monticell ■. Maxwell 

CUNEO, W. J.. 686 Capp St, S. P White 

MAGGERT, H. \'.. -:•:•" Adeline Si., i Regal 

AUSTIN, • ;. W., 1018 Broidway, Oakland Regal 

BOHLS & CO., I1-. -':"> Fremont St.. s. F Mitchell 

NICKERSON, E. a.. 2731 Bancroft, Berkeli 

roUNG, iu;s. A., ii i Stewart, S. F Packard 

DUNCAN, GEO., 7.17 1st Ave., S. F Oakland 

HAYES. W. P.. San Rafael Bulck 

SURKHARDT, MRS. n. E., let and San Antonio, San Jose. .. .Kissel 

LUHMANN, II. W., R F. I' X". 6, Pax I. San Jose Rambler 

STANDARD on. CO., I'll Market St., s. F White Truck 

HILLEN. K. C, 3285 Garfield Av. > imeda Buick 

KOHLER & CHASE, mi O'Farrell St., s. F Mitchell 

martin. J.. 310 Sa SI s. F Chalmers 

LEEDOM. W, M., 1663 Van Ness Ave., s. F Stearns 

CORR1LA, G. & M. P., 308 Washington St.. S. F Overland 

BICKFORD, a. I... 652 - ' St., Oakland Regal 

O'CONNELL BROS., 6th and St James St£ 3 a Jose E-M-F. 

HOWDEN, ROB'T. 106] Webster St., Oakland Overland 

in NX. C. B., Burlingame Ford 

LAYST. W. AY.. L'li Whitney, San Jose Maxwell 

KENNIES, H -Ion St.. S. F Regal 

LEHRKE & SONS. la.. 627 Te) ee St., S. F Kllne-Kar 

LAINE. MRS. CARRIE, I a Marian 

Warwick. H. c, 180 Jessie St., s. P Peerless 

LELAND, w. L., .,ai palboa Blag.. S. F Peerless 

IMPERIAL, AUTO CO., 6 Valencia St., s. F Imperial 

DETWILER. A. K., Ii- S. F Cadillac 

JOHN F. SXoW D. •• C WORKS, 701 Qrovi St.. Oakland. .Kartkraft 

BEISTLE, WALTER, Santa Clara Brush 

ROBINSON, A. J., 1350 Hayes St, s. P Premlei 

O'BRIEN, C, 2d and Martha, San Jose - Haynes 

CENTER, HUGH, Race and Alameda, San Jose Haynes 

WLLMER. V. W., 1041 so. 1st Si , San Jose Reo 

FOX, MRS. SARAH. \ on* Hot E - I Detroit 

ZOLEZZI, L.. 434 So. 1st St., St lbs Haynes 

PRATT, C. F., S6 So. St! i St., San Jose Rao 

western hdwre. ,vi IKON CO., DSC, 120 9th St.. Oakland. .P. 11 

HARPER. H. T., 2S20 Vallejo St.. S. F Packard 

GLENDENNING, GEO, Santa I ara Marion 

WALKER, M H. Bellevue Hotel, s. F 

KERVIN, w. R.. 1JJ4 Hyde St. s. F Winton 

NASH. 11. I... San Rafael M 

JENKINS, W. II.. Van 711, St.. S. F S. Oaytoii 

MARISCALCO si., s. F Maxwell 

STAHL, II. I.. 310 York Ave., Vallejo In , 

smiti 00 3an St, s. F iiials,,,, 

LEHNHARDT, E., 1167 Broadway, Oakland White 

GOODYEAR tire & Ri BB1 i: CO 361 Golden Bate IlVi s p.. ..Bulck 

GETZ, Si iL., Chroi - i 

SAYMAN. A., 27-5 ivislmmon St.. Oakland Metz 

BETTENCOURT, -I M San Leandro Maxwell 

BELLING, W. E., : G u i St, s. F H Isoi 

BRYAN, U'il.. 1290 66th St., Oakland \ tocai 

PACIFIC TEL. & TEL. • '• • 168 I'll, St.. S. F Velie 

ROSENER, MARDS, 944 Lake si , s. F Studebaker 

si i. PAI 'Hi' CO -■ I Bldg., S. F 

REAMS. S. R.. R. I- l • an . »■ 

DANNENBA1 m E, & rnl.i.iTi HARVE1 illejo ••..aland 

KEITH, C. w. 2413 Eagle Ave., Alameda Ramblei 

dayis. ii. A, Pleasanton Ovi 

GREEN. E. C. 2S6 Haighl SI B I Olds 

ii BERG, K. . 82 So. Mailai St., Saa Jose Bulck 

CONNELL, J. E.. 252 Diamond SI S F Auburn 

DAIRY DELIVERY CO., 71550 19th St.. S. F Overland 

* * * 

With the dust of the Sierras thick on their sides, the two 
Buick pathfinding cars for the Lake Tahoe endurance run rolled 
into Oakland Tuesday evening, having covered the entire dis- 
tance from Tahoe Tavern over the new State highway to the 
Creek Route pier in the one day. This was the first time that 



this particular run had been completed in a single day's time, 
and consequently, besides doing credit to the machines that ac- 
complished the feat, it speaks well for the road conditions that 
must have been found. The Buicks carrying the pathfinding 
committee, in which members of the local press had been asked 
to serve, left San Francisco last Sunday with Fred Gross and 
Claude McGee at the wheels. The first day's run was to Au- 
burn, and better roads or more ideal touring weather could 
hardly be found. The heat that the tourists had expected to 
encounter through the Sacramento Valley did not materialize, 
but in its stead, a refreshing breeze kept the air at just a pleas- 
ant temperature. The roads all the way to Auburn are most ex- 
cellent. In fact, they are of the boulevard type but for a few- 
short stretches, which themselves, although somewhat rough in 
a comparative sense when the rest of the route has raised one's 
expectancy, are tar better than the average run of country roads. 
While hardly to be considered from the scenic point of view 
with the final climb through the jumble of Sierra peaks, this 
first day's run, nevertheless, has considerable to offer. The 
sweep of the Oakland boulevard along the foot of the Alameda 
County hills, the serpentine through Dublin Canyon, the run 
through Livermore Vdley, and then more hills to the great 
stretch of the San Joaquin and Sacramento Valleys, and finally 
the gradual climb of the Sierra foothills to Auburn, giving a 
foretaste of what is to follow on the morrow, combine in offer- 
ing the tourist a pleasing variety. The Stockton-Sacramento 
boulevard is unquestionably one of the best in the State, and 
speaks well for the enterprise of the San Joaquin and Sacra- 
mento Counties. Of equal quality is the new Ben Ali boulevard, 
just completed this season, which takes one from the Ben Ali 
Station, about five miles above Sacramento, to within ten or 
twelve miles of Auburn. 

After a night spent in Auburn, the pathfinders started at eight 
in the morning for the climb up the long grades that were even- 
tually to land them on the summit of the high Sierras. These 
grades were truly marked with a deal of engineering skill, for 
nowhere is the incline excessive, although an elevation of over 
7,000 feet is reached. From Auburn to Emigrant Gap the 
roads have been repaired under the supervision of Placer 
County, to which all credit is due for the excellent results ob- 
tained. At Emigrant Gap the new State highway begins, and 
continues to Truckee. This stretch of road most eloquently 
evidences the efficiency of the State Engineering Department. 
Scarcely more than a month ago it took a machine six days to 
negotiate this same piece of road. Now, however, one would 
scarcely realize that the grades had been affected at all by the 
winter's snow. The only indication of what the first car over 
the summit had to endure is found just the other side of the 
summit on a short stretch of grade which is almost completely 
shaded from the sun. Here the road-repairing crew has found 
it necessary to make a cut through a snow drift, and the road 
for a distance of a few hundred feet is flanked on either side by 
banks of snow some five or six feet high. At this spot the pas- 
sengers of the two path-finding cars took occasion to oppose 
each other in a spirited snow-battle, a rather novel experience 
for the latter days of July. This bit of road was the roughest 
found on the entire climb over the mountains, but even as it 
was, it could be negotiated with little difficulty. The repairing 
crew was working on it when the path-finders passed, and it 
has doubtless been entirely smoothed out by this time. The 
road-bed for the entire distance from Auburn to Tahoe Tavern 
has been cleared of rock, and is now in even better condition 
than when the endurance run was held over it last October. 
Several of the steeper pitches have been lessened, and, where 
previously somewhat narrow, the grade has been widened. At 
present there is scarcely a point on the entire run where two 
machines cannot pass with ease. 

The scenic beauty of this run over the Sierras, with their 
majestic peaks and deep, rock-lipped canyons, is beyond de- 
scriptive words, and can be appreciated only when seen. The 
rare mountain atmosphere gives an unusual sharpness to all 
color effects. At moderate altitude the road is flanked by fine 
pine and oak trees. Higher up, however, the shrubbery, 
crouching close to the ground, and the gnarled oaks, stunted in 
their growth, tell of repeated struggles with winter snow. At 
places, too, the road is drilled through walls of hardest granite. 

Added to its scenic attraction is that other offered by the 
route's historical association. It passes through the very heart 
of the old Bret Harte country, where Gold Run and Dutch Flat 



July 29, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



recall those stirring stories of the early mining days. Emi- 
grant Gap and Donner Lake are two other of the places passed 
which are most closely identified with the gold rush to Califor- 
nia and the early development of this State. 



Noises and the Auto Warning Signal. 

In view of the country-wide agitation on the subject of un- 
necessary street noises, and the attempt that is being made to 
define just what these are, the necessity of properly classifying 
automobile warning signals is apparent. It is generally held 
that the best way to arrive at a satisfactory conclusion in this 
regard is to apply the same rule to the warning signal that is 
applied to the speed at which the automobile may be driven — 
that is, regulation. 

It is impossible to deal justly with this problem on the basis 
of theory. The fact that the purpose of an automobile warning 
signal is to prevent accident means that consideration thereof 
must be of necessity the first step taken. In legislating, or dis- 
cussing the warning signal question, therefore, it cannot be 
justly forgotten that this is a matter of principle, and not of 
impulse. The following signed statement in this regard by 
Hudson Maxim, who is recognized as an international authority 
in the matter of sound, is of especial interest: 

"I am firmly convinced, from many years of practical experi- 
ence in automobiling, that the automobile must be equipped 
with a distinctive signaling device, capable of giving an effec- 
tive warning signal which must, of necessity, in order to be a 
warning signal, be a harsh and startling sound. Such a sig- 
naling device enables the chauffeur to avoid many serious ac- 
cidents, which would inevitably result from the employment 
of a device emitting a pleasant or musical sound. 

"Caution and skill on the part of the chauffeur in the choice 
of speed and in the use of his brakes are not alone sufficient to 
prevent collisions. He must be armed also with a strong, effec- 
tive warning signal. 

"The abolition of such warning devices on automobiles oper- 
ated in crowded city streets would certainly result in injury to 
numerous persons and the loss of many lives, with consequent 
damage suits brought against drivers and owners of automo- 
biles. 

"The automobilist who makes unnecessary use of his harsh 
sounding signal horn is as liable to punishment for misdemeanor 
as he would be were he to go through the streets shouting at the 
top of his voice. 

"The antiquated bulb horn is about as inefficient a signal- 
ing device as could be devised. If the chauffeur happens to 
become at all excited and attempts to make an unusually loud 
sound with it, the tongue generally closes, with the result that 
it makes no sound whatever." 

* * » 

Ever since the present management of the Thomas cars took 
hold of affairs at the Buffalo factory there has been something 
doing all the time. It was away back in February when E. P. 
Chalfant, F. R. Humpage, W. L. Gleason and J. J. Ramsey 
packed their grips and moved over from Detroit to Buffalo. 
These four men had been business associates for years. Oppor- 
tunity knocked at their doors and found them ready for the 
job. Other men who had worked with them followed, and the 
plans for the 1912 Thomas Six-Forty were under way. 

F. H. Trego and H. M. Jerome were selected as Chief and 
Assistant Engineers. Bill Birmingham was brought along as 
superintendent of the factory, and with George Fitzsimons as 
sales manager, the new organization soon got into its stride. 

In May, three experimenral cars were completed and put on 
the road for the strenuous Thomas test in the Alleghany Moun- 
tains. They did all they were asked to do in what was prob- 
ably the severest endurance trial ever given a motor car. By 
the end of June three more cars of the same design were com- 
pleted in order to show to the Thomas dealers. 

* * * 

The car that had the highest scores and won the most prizes 
in the Little Glidden tour in Iowa was a Cadillac touring car, 
driven by D. S. Kruidenier, the owner. This car had a perfect 
score in the technical examination, which is the real test of a 
car after a reliability run. Thus the Cadillac won the trophy 
for its class, and the sweepstakes prize, because it was the only 
car which showed perfect scores on the road and in the har.r.3 



of the technical committee. In addition to these, Mr. Kruide- 
i r also won the owners' prize, which was hung up for the 
most conspicuous performance of a car driven by an owner. 
Iiile this record was being made over Iowa roads, other 
C lillac cars were doing brilliant work in reliability runs in 
other parts of the v/orld. In the New Zealand reliability trials 
a Cadillac was the only car to make a non-stop run in the open 
class, and won first prize and a gold medal. In the private 
owners' division, another Cadillac was awarded a gold medal 
for having made a non-stop run. This car had been driven ' 
60,000 miles prior to entering the contest. Both were awarded 
perfect scores, and they were the only contestants fully 
equipped for touring. In the Tasmanian reliability trials, 
Cadillac cars were declared winners in their respective classes. 

James H. Schwabacher, of the Schwabacher-Frey Stationery 
Company, just returned from a trip to Lake Tahoe in his 
Chalmers "40" car, and states it was the most enjoyable trip 
he ever had, and that he covered the four hundred miles with- 
out a mishap of any kind. Mr. Schwabacher traveled through 
Europe in this same Chalmers car, negotiating some 25,000 
miles, and suggests that a good way for one to spend his sum- 
mer vacation is to buy a machine of the Chalmers type and 
take trips such as the one he just made to Lake Tahoe. 

* * * 

The Frank O. Renstrom Company is just in receipt of a let- 
ter from Dr. D. H. Leppo of Santa Rosa, who has just returned 
from a vacation in the mountains. The Leppo party made the 
trip in the Doctor's Kline-Kar, and state that they had a most 
enjoyable time. The trip was a hard one, but the machine did 
not have to undergo a single adjustment or repair. 

* * * 

Doctors Keel and Williams, two Middle-West physicians who 
are spending their vacation in a Cole "30," and driving across 
the continent, reached Sacramento on Saturday. There they 
will spend a few days before coming on to San Francisco, and, 
on this strenuous trip the doctors express themselves as more 
than pleased with the performance of the Cole "30." 

* * * 

Henry Lehrke & Sons recently purchased a 6-60 Kline Tour- 
ing car from the Frank O. Renstrom Company. Messrs. G. & A. 
Lehrke are contemplating an extended tour of Mendocino and 
Humboldt Counties in their new machine, within the next few 
weeks. 

* * * 

The two Buick pathfinding cars for the Lake Tahoe Endur- 
ance run used Monogram Oil on the trip, and to its lubricating 
credit, in large measure, is due their success in establishing a 
record for the return run of but little over thirteen hours actual 
running time from Tahoe Tavern to the Oakland mole. 

* * * 

Col. A. W. Bradbury, of the Pacific Motor Car Company, ac- 
companied by Mrs. Bradbury and a party of friends, drove to 
Del Monte in a six-cylinder Stevens-Duryea to spend the week- 
end. 

* * * 

Mr. Brinkmann, formerly manager of the Bosch Magneto 
Company's San Francisco branch, resigned his position with 
the company July 10th. 

* * * 

The Pacific Motor Car Company advises us of the delivery 
of a Stevens-Duryea six-cylinder touring car to the Auto Gas 
Engine Starter Company. 

» * * 

Miss Hilda Clough, of San Francisco, with a party of friends, 
motored from Los Angeles in her six-cylinder Stevens-Duryea 
to Del Monte, where, after a time, they will drive on to San 
Francisco. 

* * « 

Mr. H. E. Wright is doing a great deal of touring this season 
in his big six-cylinder Stevens-Duryea. Mr. Wright drove from 
San Francisco to Glenbrook, Nevada, and will tour Nevada be- 
fore returning to San Francisco. 

* * • 

The Pacific Motor Car Company has just delivered to Mr. H. 
C. Tibbitts. San Francisco, a six-cylinder Stevens-Duryea tour- 
ing car. 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 




Climbing a rough mountain toad while testing. 

The new Stearns-K night passing a tavern built in 1794. 

Testing the Stearns-K night in the Alleghanies. 

Driving from Cleveland, Ohio, to Pittsburg, Bedford Springs, 
Harrisburg and Gettysburg, Pa., thence to Cumberland, Md., 
and back to Cleveland, one of the new Stearns-Knight models, 
recently completed one of the most strenuous mountain runs 
ever attempted. During the three days the car covered over 
795 miles, 580 of which was mountain running. 

The trip was one of many made during the past year and a 
half by the Stearns experimental and production departments 
in testing out the new Stearns-Knight steam valve motor. From 
start to finish the car worked perfectly, despite the usage given 
the motor. 

Five men and four hundred pounds of luggage and camping 
materials made up the load. No attempt was made to break 
speed records — the object of the trip was to test and prove the 
car and engine in every conceivable way. 

Over eighteen miles an hour was averaged straight through 
the mountains, including the single stop for tires made on the 
entire trip. This one puncture was the only stop on the entire 
trip, aside from filling the gasoline tank, etc. 



SHOCK ABSORBERS THAT DO 
ABSORB SHOCKS 

Thvow away the straps that jerk the seat from tinder you. 




Martin "One- Way" Shock Absorbers 

Act Only When the Springs Recoil 

Not i spring stiffener that hampers the springs on their compres- 
sion movement. It's tin- easy riding you're after, without the ter- 
rific force of the recoil. 

Teddy Tetzlaff took a set of "two-way acting" shock absorbers 
off his Lozier and equipped it with Martins, which enabled him to 
hold a higher rate of speed at Santa Monica, establishing the 
American Road Race record of 73.27 miles an hour, as well as the 
26, 50, 75 and 100 mile records. Martins won the Los Anu< ■]• s- 
Phoenix road race, over i)S miles of the roughest desert country in 
the West. Tetzlaff and other drivers have adopted the "Martin" 
as they have done the wonderful, accurate Warner Autometer. 

Martin Shock Absorbers are sold on a guarantec-to-satlsfy basis, 
and may be returned within thirty days if they are not satisfactory. 

Halliwell Company 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS, 



36-38 Van Ness Ave. 



Phones: Market 6800, J 3619 



TIRES 

5,000 MILES 

There is one big feature about AJAX 
TIRES that make them different from 
every other tire: the service they 
render under all conditions. 

Not only are AJAX TIRES as strong 
and well made as any en the market 
and sold at no higher price — but they 
positively give 30 <$, more service. 

The user of AJAX TIRES is assured 
of long tire mileage, and absence from 
tire troubles — the kind of service 
every motorist wants and which AJAX 
TIRES are guaranteed to give. 

Hughson & Merton 

PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS 

544 VAN NESS AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO 
Los Angeles Portland Seattle 



July 29, 1911 



and California Advertiser 



27 



What is considered one of the biggest transactions that has 
occurred in the motor car industry for some time is the recent 
formation of the Willys-Garford Sales Company, which will 
act as a selling organization for Garford cars. 

Wide-spread surprise was caused when the announcement 
was made that John N. Willys, the energetic President of the 
Overland Company, h?d consummated a deal with Arthur L. 
Garford, President of the Garford Company, whereby Garford 
pleasure cars and commercial vehicles would be marketed by 
Willys-Overland dealers. The Willys-Garford Sales Company, 
the headquarters of which will be in Toledo, Ohio, has a capi- 
tal of $10,000, all stock being owned and controlled by John N. 
Willys and his Overland associates. Mr. Garford is not a stock- 
holder or an official in the new organization. The Willys- 
Overland Company and the Garford Company will remain sepa- 
rate and distinct entities, each conducting its manufacturing 
operations as in the past, the Willys-Garford Sales Company 
being absolutely a selling organization, pure and simple. 

* * * 

On June 9th, Bruce Emerson drove a Detroit Electric one-ton 
truck with a load of 1,200 pounds in addition to the weight of 
two men, from Washington, D. C, to Baltimore and return, a 
distance of 79 miles, on one charge, in 8 hours and 10 minutes. 
On the return the ampere hour meter showed the machine could 
have been driven several more miles before the charge was out. 
Although this is not the first time an electric has been driven 
from Washington to Baltimore and return on one charge, it is 
the first time the trip has been attempted by an electric truck. 
The roads were found in good shape, and during the greater 
portion of the way the car was driven at its maximum rate of 
speed, 12 miles an hour. In coasting down hill, at times it at- 
tained a speed of 35 miles an hour. From the time that Mr. 
Emerson left Washington until he arrived back in the city, 
shortly before 6 o'clock, he declares he did not experience the 
slightest trouble. 

* * * 

R. A. Chisholm, one of San Francisco's prominent contrac- 
tors, has just completed a six hundred mile trip through the 
Tahoe section and Nevada, in his Chalmers "30" car, and the 
only mishap he nad during the entire journey was the punctur- 
ing of a tire when he was at Livermore on his way home. From 
Tallac, Mr. Chisholm drove to Carson Valley, over the moun- 
tain through Carson to Reno, to Truckee, and to the Summit. 
Mr. Chisholm advises motorists who desire to go over the sum- 
mit to take all necessary equipment, as the snow is twelve feet 
deep and it will be fully a month before it is melted. From 
the summit he went to Auburn, encountering good roads on the 
way, and thence home. During the trip he averaged fourteen 
miles to a gallon of gasoline. 

* * * 

The amateur champion of America, Frank Hart, now ama- 
teur championship motorcyclist, by virtue of his fine perform- 
ances in winning 19 out of a possible 21 points in the national 
championship motorcycle events at Buffalo. July 14th and 15th, 
won the Bosch Magneto Company's handsome trophy and the 
title of Amateur Champion of America. In the two days of 
racing, Hart won practically every amateur event, including 
the one hour championship, during which time he rode 60 5 8 
miles, including one stop for gasoline and oil. This is excel- 
lent mileage, considering the condition of the Fort Erie Track, 
which is a one-mile dirt oval used almost exclusively for horse- 
racing. 

* • • 

The F. B. Stearns Company has announced that its latest 
model, the Steams-Knight, using the famous Knight type sleeve 
valve motor, will carry the Warner speedometer. Model K. as 
standard equipment. This is in addition to the top, windshield, 
electric generator lighting system, combination oil and electric 
side and tail lamps, electric tonneau lamp, Continental Q. D. ~ 
demountable rims, Klaxton horn, muffler cut-out, robe rail, foot V VllCfllliZirifi 
rest, trunk rack, etc. " 

* • • 



Splitdorf Magneto 

CONTINUES TO WIN ! 

The SPLITDORF equipped National won the 

150-mile Free-for-all event at Bakersfleld 

July 4, with the SPLITDORF equipped 

Mercer third. 

In the light car race the SPLITDORF equipped 

Baick won, the SPLITDORF equipped Ford 

finishing second. 

Again proving conclusively 

The Surpassing Quality of Splitdorf Ignition 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH 

520 VAN NESS AVE. 
San Francisco 




fDL,VA\BV.S 

V£^ECTRIC 

THE 
CAR SUPREME 



EXPERT AND EXCLUSIVE ELECTRIC GARAGING. 
1664-1556 VAN NESS AVENUE 



SPARKING BATTERIES 
Loaned. Charged and 
Overhauled. Expert 
Spark Coil and Magneto 
Repairing. 
Phone Franklin 1275 
San Francisco 



Guarantee Battery Co. 



630 Van Ness Ave. 

Phone Franklin 2772 

"jExtoC" BATTERIES 

Batteries Charged and 

Overhauled 

Automobile Wiring 

Electric Accessories 

Elect robola Head and 

Side-Lights 

Coil Repairing 



162 5 Pacific Ave. 

PHONES: 
Franklin 1510 C 4760 

High Grade 

ELECTRIC 
VEHICLE 
GARAGE 

Expert Exclusive 

Electrical Vehicle Charging 

and Repairing 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft, and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States. Canada, and Europe 

AETNA INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD 

PACIFIC BRANCH— 514 California Street. San Francisco 



Mr. W. D. Newerf left .July 5th for the East to purchase new 
lines of goods tor his San Francisco and Los Angeles store:. 
Mr. Newerf is making a visit to the different factories which he 
represents, and expects to bring back several new lines of au- 
tomobile accessories w^ich have never been shown on the Coast 
before. 



PEART & ELKTNGTON 



Phon* Mirk«t 6*70. 



43 Van Nsss Avenui. 



Francises, Cat. 



FOR SALE. — Autocar Runabout, with top. lamps and generator, in good 
condition. Price. $150. Apply 21 Sutter street. 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 




Wheelbase 118 inches 
Horse Power 40 
Tires 34 x 4 inches 
Price $1600 
F. 0. B. Toledo 




A Town and Country Car 

How many times have you grazed at one of these striking cars as it noiselessly swept by and argued with yourself that 
it must be one of those high priced machines that cost well up in the four figures? 

You probably did not know at the time that your eager eyes were riveted on the famous Overland Model 52, the price 
of which is but Si 600.00. You probably do not realize now that a car of such rare beauty, rich design and mechanical 
perfection can be had at such a remarkably low figure. The Overland Company can produce such exceptional value for 
they are the largest individual motor car manufacturers in the world. 

This car is equipped with a powerful *'40"— has the fashionable fore-doors, with door handles and shifting levers 
inside, giving the machine that clean cut. well groomed appearance. 

In every sense this Overland is a town and country car. One to take country jaunts and lone tours in— one that is 
large and r corny enough to pack in a good sized party— a car that is built for country service as well as for social service in the city 



The man who owns this Overland eliminates the necessity of getting several machines. 
in your city. Write us today for one of our handsome books. 



Look up the Overland dealer 



THE WILLYS-OVERLAND COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE J. W. LEAVITT COMPANY 

Pacific Coast Distributors 
PORTLAND 



TOLEDO, OHIO 



SEATTLE 



THE REASON: 



good business men everywhere 
endorse durable dayton trucks 



DESIGN : Original, masterful and always attractive 

MATERIALS : Endorsed and used by the world's greatest builders 

CONSTRUCTION : DURABLE DAYTON, and stands supreme 

PRICE : Better quality and greater tonnage for less 

GUARANTEE : We are originators of the continuous service guarantee 




Three ton Model K chassis 83300 f. o. b. Dayton. Ohio 
DURABLE DAYTON TRUCKS made in three sizes 1 1-2, 3, 5 ton-30, 45, 60 horse-power 

DUFFEY BROS. MOTOR TRUCK CO. 

1133-35 Market Street, San Francisco 









July 29. 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



Two more splendid records went to the credit of the Stearns 
in Seattle, Washington, this week, when A. C. Stevens, of that 
city, driving a Stearns Toy Tonneau Runabout, won decisively 
in the $3,u00-$5,0u0 class, defeating the Lozier, Packard, 
American Special and two Wintons. Later in the afternoon, 
the same car and driver scored another win, when in the feature 
event of the day, the free-for-all, they defeated a splendid field 
of cars, including the National, Lozier, two Stoddard-Daytons, 
American Special, Packard, and a number of other cars. 

The latest sensation in automobiling in the Pacific Northwest 
is that of bear hunting by automobile. George Wright, a drug- 
gist of Vancouver, Washington, recently purchased a Buick 
"30" touring car from the Portland branch of the Howard Au- 
tomobile Company, and accompanied by his friends, C. J. Moss 
and Thomas Short, left their homes in Vancouver for a bear 
hunt in the mountains north of Washougal. The three men 
and the six bear dogs owned by Mr. Wright, together with their 
camp outfit, occupied the car which was driven to Bear Bridge 
in the mountain fastnesses twenty miles north of Washougal. 
The autoists had scarcely established their camp before the 
dogs took up the trail of a bear which they succeeded in treeing 
within the short space of twenty minutes. Bruin was quickly 
despatched and proved to be of the brown species and weighed 
four hundred pounds. Some interesting photographs were taken 
of the dead bear and the machine. The hunt was soon resumed, 
and after a tramp of about four miles behind the dogs the auto- 
ists succeeded in despatching a small black bear weighing 185 
pounds, which the dogs had treed after a short chase. 

* * * 

Covering the seven-eighths of a mile course on Potlatch Hill, 
Seattle, Wash., in 1 minute, 9 4-5 seconds, an "Everitt 30" won 
victory in its class. The contest was held July 17th. The 
achievement of the Everitt in defeating other well-known cars 
of approximate horsepower is made the more notable by rea- 
son of the fact that since last November the car has done more 
than 11,000 miles in livery or "hack" service in and about 
Seattle. In the free-for-all, the Everitt was 4 2-5 seconds be- 
hind the winning car; and in this event competed with cars of 
twice its power. 

Potlatch Hill is famous in the Northwest as one of the most 
difficult climbs west of the Rockies. It is particularly danger- 
ous, and fine and skillful driving is required, because a steep 
precipice, several hundred feet high, flanks one side of the 
roadway; and there is a very sharp angle in the grade. The 
hill is famed among Northwestern motorists because few cars 
in the West, even the best and most powerful, are able to make 
the grade without going into second and even low gear. 

« * * 

Mrs. D. W. McElligott, wife of D. W. McElligott, of the 
Warner Instrument Co., has left for an extended tour in a big 
six-cylinder car with a party of friends. They will tour the 
entire southern part of the State. Mrs. McElligott, who is one 
of the best amateur photographers in the State, has taken two 
of the latest model cameras with her, and expects to return with 
a fine collection of road photos. 

* * * 

Mr. P. S. Cole, salesman of the Pioneer Automobile Com- 
pany, left here last week for a visit to the Chalmers factory at 
Detroit. This will be Mr. Cole's first visit to the factory since 
he has been selling Chalmers cars, and he intends spending 
several days there learning how Chalmers cars are made. Mr. 
Cole will also visit New York and several other Eastern cities, 

acquainting himself with automobile conditions. 

* * * 

Del Monte Motoring Parties. 

Lawrence Pickering and John McMullin of the Bulletin staff 
drove over to Del Monte in their machine from Santa Cruz for 
the week-end. 

Mr. J. T. Garner, of Los Angeles, has gone up to Del Monte 
for some golfing. He is accompanied by Mrs. Garner and her 
daughter, Miss Janette. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Alexander and Miss Alexander, prominent 
Watsonville residents, were among the week's arrivals at Del 
Monte. 

Mr. George Denis motored up in his car from the South last 
week for a few days at Del Monte. Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Per- 
kins, Dwight Whiting and George Whiting also drove up from 
the South. 




A WOMAN'S taste is judged by the 
car she rides in. Her indi- 
viduality and breeding are evi- 
denced in its Style and appointments. 

The Detroit Electric combines that 
dignity with grace, and Style without 
display which reflects the woman of 
tastes at once fastidious and fashionable. 




The models for 1911 vary in style and 
design, but are alike in stability and 
grace. The upholstering has been planned 
to suit a variety of tastes— in leather de 
luxe, broadcloth, hand-buffed satins; in 
English whipcords and in imported 
goatskin. 

THE DETROIT ELECTRIC is equipped 
with reStful. resilient cushions — an ap- 
peal to the woman whose nerves need 
relaxing after a social Strain. 

With the use of Edison Batteries there 
is no danger; no delay: no walk to the 
nearest garage for help. 



Call, write or telephone 
demonstration. 



for 



Reliance Automobile Co. 

342-352 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 



Look for This Sign 
on leading Garages 




You cannot know what 
a good tire is until you 
try a MICHELIN pro- 
perly inflated. 

MICHELIN TIRE 
COMPANY 

308-314 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco 

Phone Market 800 



GOODRICH 
TIRES 



The Tough White 
Tread is not affect- 
ed by extremely hot 
temperature or 
blistering sands. 

THE B. F. GOODRICH 
CO., of California 

.141 Market Street, San Francisco 



JONES 

SPEEDOMETERS 



Accurate and 
Reliable 

544 Van Ness Ave. 
San Francisco. Cal. 



GOODYEAR 

NO RIM CUT 

TIRES 



Factory Branch 

THE GOODYEAR TIRE AND 

RUBBER CO. 

361-363 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 



HOWARD 

AUTOMOBILE 

COMPANY 



Distributors for Pacific Coast 
BUICK. and OLDSMOB1LES 



523-533 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco. Cat. 



Phone: Market 1535 and 1536 
Home J 2313 



MONOGRAM 
OIL 



Louis Disbrow used Monogram Oil 
when he made his world's record at 
the recent Pablo Beach Races in 
Florida with his Pope-Hartford car. 

This adds another to MONOGRAM'S 
long list of achievements. Make 
the expert's choice your choice. 



AUTO TOP 

MANUFACTURING 

COMPANY 



AutQ Tops, Seat Covers, Lamp 
Covers, Etc. 

LOUIS J. CARL 

425-431 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



AUTO 

COMMERCIAL 

PHOTO CO. 



AUTOMOBILE PHOTOGRAPHS 

A SPECIALTY 

568 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 



EXPERT 

AUTOMOBILE 

PAINTING 



P. J. KRUG 
425-431 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco 

Woodworking, Blacksmithine 

and every known repair for 

the automobile 

All Work Guaranteed 



KEENAN BROS. 



Machinists and Engineers 

Automobile Repairing a Specialty 

350 Golden Gate Avenue, bet. Hyde 

and Laikln Streets 
Phones: Franklin 6823. Home J 2012 



PANHARD 
OIL 



FREE FROM CARBON 
L. H. & B. I. BILL 

543 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco. Cal. 



THE MARION 



The Thousand Man Car 
As Quiet as a Mouse 

Thos. O. Heydenfeldt 
Distributor 

540 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco. Cal. 



HARTFORD 

SHOCK 
ABSORBERS 



Makes All Roads Smooth Roads 

CHANSLOR & LYONS MOTOR 

SUPPLY CO. 



501 



Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 



McTARNAHAN 
VULCANIZING 
AND TIRE CO. 



Compare Our Prices and 
Bargains 

630 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco 



MOHRIG 
BROS. 



New Things For The Motorist 

and the Best 

542 Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco, Cal. 



LEO GILLIG 



Auto Tops, Upholstering. Seat Covers. 
Etc. Automobile Painting, Varnish- 
ing, Blacks m (thing. Woodworking 
and Body Making. Repairing in all 
Its branches. First Class Work. 
Reasonable Rates. Fire Proof Build- 
ing. 3}i-J Grove St., near Franklin 
St.. San Francisco. Phones: Park 
1323, Home S 3328. 



REMY 
MAGNETO 



REMY ELECTRIC CO. 

170 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



DIAMOND 
TIRES 



Give Greatest Milage 

THE DIAMOND RUBBER CO. 

of New York 

C. E. Mathewson, Pacific Coast Mgr. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



DORIAN 

REMOUNTABLE 

RIMS 



ARE THE BEST 



W. D. NEWERF RUBBER CO. 
Distributors 



535 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC 

AUTOMOBILE 

EXCHANGE 



The Largest Automobile Repair Shop 
In the West 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

465 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco. Cal. 

CORREJA CARS 



July 29, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 

The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 
SAN MATEO. — San Mateo Garage (fire proof), 350 B street. 'Phone 
Mateo 404. Morton & Beer. Props. Open day and night. Expert automo- 
bile repairing, supplies, battery charging, high-grade gasoline and oils. 
Electric vehicle charging. 

NORTH OF BELMONT. — Cypress Lodge. First-class mixed drinks. 
Bring your lunch baskets and enjoy our little forest. Special attention to 
motor parties. CHAS. P. HOWKE, Prop. 

REDWOOD CITY.— REDWOOD CITY GARAGE, 701 Mound St. Miller 
Paulsen. Prop. Vulcanizing, gasoline and oils. Complete machine shop. 
Repairs and all work guaranteed. Tel. Black 293. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
PALO ALTO. — Palo Alto. Garage, the only first-class fire-proof garage 
in Palo Alto. 443 Emmerson street (one and a half blocks from depot). 
Expert automobile mechanics. High-grade oils, gasoline and sundries. 
Phone P. A. 333. 

SANTA CLARA.— SANTA CLARA GARAGE. C. F. Pait; E. C. Molitor. 
Home of the Marion. Autos for hire. Gasoline and oil, and all kinds of 
sundries and repairs. Phone: S. C. 93. 1049-51 Washington St., Santa 
Clara. Cal. Always ready. 

SAN JOSE. — Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St James Sts. 

SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street The best French 
dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

SAN JOSE.— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE. Market and St. James 

street. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 

ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 

service. Rambler, Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. (See under Stockton.) 

GILROY. — Central Hotel, A. C. Richardson, Prop. Headquarters for au- 
tomobilists. Bar in connection. Newly furnished throughout. Telephone 
Main 861. 

GILROY.— FOWLER'S GARAGES (one on North Main street; the other 
near S. P. Depot.) Phones Main 463 and Main 1093. Rent cars at all hours. 
Tires and Sundries in stock; gasoline, oil, repairing, lathe work, vul- 
canizing. Open day and night. 

SANTA CRUZ. — Bull's Fire-proof Garage. 269 Pacific avenue. 5 and 7 
passenger autos for hire. Auto sundries and repairing. Phone 269. 

MONTEREY COUNTY. 
SALINAS.— COOPER'S GARAGE. Phillips & Rossi. Props. Phone Main 
56. No. 320 Main street. Open day and night. Expert repairing. Supplies. 
Gasoline and oils. Two rent cars. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 
PASO ROBLES.— Pioneer Garage, fireproof. W. C. Henderson, prop.; 
agents for Bulck and Maxwell. Five and seven -passenger cars for hire. 
Expert repairing. Open day and night. High-grade gasoline and oils. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO.— CALIFORNIA GARAGE. A. Luchessa. Proprie- 
tor. Dealer m Automobiles and Bicycles. Repairs and supplies. Every- 
thing complete. Building fire-proof. 879-881 Higuera St.. San Luis 
Obispo, Col. Phone 789 R. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 
SANTA MARIA.— SANTA MARIA GARAGE. W. L. Donnelly. Prop. 
Phones. Main 1861; Home 41. General automobile work; gasoline, oil, 
sundries, tires, etc. All work guaranteed. Night phone Sunset Main 340. 

LOS OLIVOS.— MATTEI'S TAVERN. Felix Mattel. Prop. Finest hunt- 
ing and fishing In season. Headquarters for sportsmen and automobile 
parties. Mountain trout served at meals during season. 

SANTA BARBARA.— MISSION GARAGE. 1221-23 State St., near Arling- 
ton Hotel. E. G. Hayward, Prop. The finest Are proof garage in Southern 
California. Automobile supplies, repair shop. Open day and night 
Phones, Home 2243; Pacific 191. Rent and touring cars. 

VENTURA.— MERCER'S GARAGE (fire proof.) W. E. Mercer. Prop. 
Open day and night. Phones Main 17 and Home 7. Expert repairing, oils, 
gasoline and sundries. Rent and touring cars. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL.— WHITE OARAGE (fire proof) Eighth and 
Olive streets. Phones Mai hostelry for 

the care and maintenance of automobiles. Open day and night Experi- 
enced employees. Pits, workbenches, etc., for free use of tourists. Gaso- 
line and supplies. 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 
STOCKTON.— WALLACE Bros.' GARAGE. 30 S. Sutter Street Moat 
• nvenlent location. Best of service. Large stock sundries. Rambler, 
"akland and Hupmobile agencies. Phone Ma in 287. (See San Jose.) 

SONOMA COUNTY. 
PETALUMA.— PETALUMA GARAGE, Sparks & Murphy, Proprietors 

■-'uccessois to McNour Garage.) General machine work. Supplies re- 
i Miring and auto livery; lubricating oils and gasoline. First-class ac- 

< "tnmodatlons for ladies. Corner Third and C streets. Tel. Petaluma 3 

< '.ilifornla. 

SANTA ROSA.— HOUTS AUTO CO., Mendocino Avenue, one-half block 
north of Court Hcuse. Expert automobile repairing, supplies, tires, oils 
and gasoline. Opt,n day and night. Telephone 627. Agents Overland, 
.Stoddard-Dayton. Kissel-Kar. 

LAKE COUNTY. 
LAKEPORT.— LAKEVTEW HOTEL, leading and best-appointed hotel 
in town. Headquarters for automobile touring parties and commercial 
men. Phone Main 1. Geo. Beebe, Prop., Lakeport, Cal. See him — that's all. 

LAKEPORT.— LAKEPORT GARAGE. Vulcanizing, batteries charged, 
gasoline and lubricants. First-class machine work. One block from 
Postofflce. F. E. Watkins, Prop. Phone Main 521. 



FISK 

TIRES 



"THE STANDARD 

OF Q.UAUTY" 

Made to fit 
all Style rims 

For Sale by All Dealers 



Firestone 

TIRES AND DEMOUNTABLE RIMS 

THE FIRESTONE TIRE AND RUBBER CO. 
Cor. Van Ness and Fulton San Francisco 






Motor Cars 



The Thomas B. Jeffery Company of California, 121-123 Valencia Street, San Francisco 



GASOLINE 

SAFETY 

APPLIANCE 

CO. 



We will equip your automobile with 
« ^afety Device which is screwed Into 
the filling hole of the gasoline tank, 
and guarantee no explosion will take 
place, even though you happen to drop 
a lighted match Into the tank. 

349 Van Ness Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



SIMPLEX MOTOR CARS 

SIMPLEX PACIFIC COAST AGENCY 

J. N. BURGE. Manager 

124-126 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 



San Francisco 



Los Angeles 



Fresno 



Seattle 



Portland 



Spokane 



Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co., Inc. 



AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 
501-509 GOLDEN GATE 



Pacific Coast Agents HARTFORD TIRES 
AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



Champion Wind Shield Manufacturing Company 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

"a^acturerso. GLASS FRONTS FOR AUTOMOBILES 

QUALITY STRENGTH SIMPLICITY 

Absolutely Guaranteed 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 29, 1911. 



BANKING 



Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits $11,060,796.92 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10,170,490.90 

Total Resources 43,774,997.72 



I. W. Hellman, Jr.. 

F. L. Lipman 

James K. Wilson . . 
Frank B. King ... 



Isaias W. Hellman, President. 

.Vice-President W. McGavin Assistant Cashier 

.Vice-President E. L. Jacobs Assistant Cashier 

.Vice-President V. H. RossettI ...Assistant Cashier 

Cashier C. L. Davis Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 



Isaias W. Hellman 
C. de Guigne 
Leon Sloss 
Percy T. Morgan 
P. W. Van Sicklen 
Hartland Law 

Customers of this 
dent banking. New 



I. W. Hellman, Jr. 
William Sprouie 
Wm. Haas 
Wm. F. Herrin 
John C. Kirkpatrick 



James L. Flood 
Henry Rosenfeld 
J. Henry Meyei 
Charles J. Deering 
James K. Wilson 
F. L. Lipman 



bank are offered every facility consistent with pru- 
accounts are invited. SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO 

SIR EDMUND WALKER C. V. O.. LL. D.. D. C. L. 
President 



ALEXANDER LAIRD 



General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 

Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 8,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently Issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are is- 
sued in denominations of 

$10, $20, $50, $100, and $200 

and the exact amount payable in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated on the face of each cheque, while in other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Mannger 

450 California Street corner Leldesdorff 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings (The German Bank) Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

reserve and Contingent Funds 1,605,792.68 

Employees' Pension Fund 113.473.47 

Deposits June 30, 1911 44,567,705.83 

Total Assets 47,173,498.51 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post Office, or Express Co.'s Money 
Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours — 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m.. except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock m., and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock p. m. 
for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; 
Second Vice-President and Manager, George Tourny; Third Vice-Presi- 
dent. .J. "W. Van Bergen; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. 
William Herrmann; Secretary, A. H. Muller; Assistant Secretaries, G. J. O, 
Folte and Wm. D. Newhouse; Goodfellow. Eells & Orrick, General Attor- 
neys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, George Tourny, J. 
W. Van Bergen, Ign. Steinhart. I. N. Walter, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. 
*Kruse and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH — 2572 Mission Street, between 21st and 22d streets. 
For receipt and payment of deposits only. C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH — 132 Clement street, between 5th and 
6th avenues. For receipt and payment of deposits only. W. C. Heyer, 
Manager. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

N. W. COR. OF SUTTER AND SANSOME STS. 

Paid Up Capital $4,000,000.00 

Reserve and Undivided Profits 1,700.000.00 

Deposits 23,600,000.00 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10,300,000.00 

SIg. Greenebaum, President. 
H. Fieishhacker, Vice-Pres. & Mgr. A. Hochstein Asst. Cashier 



Jos. Friedlander Vice-President 

C. F. Hunt Vice-President 

R. Altschul Cashier 

A. L. Langerman Secretary 



C. R. Parker Asst Cashier 

Wm. H. High Asst. Cashier 

H. Choynskl Asst. Cashier 

G. R. Rurdlck Asst. Cashier 



Issues Travellers' Letters of Credit, available in all parts of the world; 
buys and sells Foreign Exchange, and Issues drafts and cable transfers. 
Accounts of Banks, Bankers, Corporations, Firms, and Individuals 
Invited. SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



ri 



UBBER STAMi 



Stencils.Seals.Signs&Etc. 



560 MARKET ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 




All Eyes Upon 
Castro and Zelaya. 



For the time being, the Balkan 
States will have to retire from the 
centre of the stage and look on 
while the two deposed and banished 
Latin-American ex-Presidents, Castro of Venezuela, and Zelaya 
of Nicaragua, play their sketch. Both of these worthies have 
escaped the vigilance of a half dozen wide-awake nations, and 
are now preparing to start a civil war in their respective coun- 
tries. But revolutions are nothing new or strange in Latin- 
America, but in the case of Castro there is grave danger of in- 
ternational complications, for if he persists in fighting for the 
Presidency, Germany, France and England would not feel like 
keeping hands off because of the Monroe doctrine. The finan- 
cial interests of their subjects are too great to be left unpro- 
tected if Castro is in power with his well-known hostility to the 
nations mentioned, and to the United States. On the other hand, 
during the presidency, on more than one occasion he took 
refuge behind the Monroe and Drago declarations, and suc- 
ceeded in keeping England, Germany and France from invading 
his country or in any way retaliating for his country's perfidy. 
It is no doubt true, as he says, that he has been "shadowed" by 
United States secret service men at every turn since his au 
revoir as he stepped aboard of the ship that was to bear him 
abroad, that he might consult with European physicians con- 
cerning a certain ailment of which he claimed to be afflicted, 
but all that ailed him was that he would be condemned to death 
by a court martial "packed" for that purpose. Three times in 
the last twenty years the United States has protected Venez- 
uela from invasion and spoilation, once by England, once by 
Germany and once by France by hoisting the flag of the Mon- 
roe doctrine and calling a halt. Castro has always believed 
that the United States would not fail to send its army and navy 
against any foreign power that might feel inclined to force his 
country to play fair and make its promises good; and yet Cas- 
tro, as President of Venezuela, as a private citizen of that coun- 
try, or as a refugee from Venezuelan justice, has never missed 
an opportunity to discredit the United States with his own peo- 
ple, or with the Latin States, or with the nations of Europe. In 
1895 Castro was known by his country as the boldest and most 
successful cattle thief in Venezuela, but by 1903 he was a 
powerful political leader and revolutionist, and his conduct be- 
came so murderous during the next few years that but for the 
fear of discrediting the Monroe principle, the Washington Gov- 
ernment would have shut its eyes to the demonstration England, 
France, Germany and the Netherlands were making, or prepar- 
ing to make, in Venezuelan waters and on Venezuelan land. 
But the United States, because of its policy to defend the prin- 
ciple of the Monroe doctrine, President Roosevelt, following the 
example of President Cleveland, stopped the hostile demonstra- 
tion at the moment England and Italy were ready to bombard 
Venezuelan port? and land marines. Thus again the United 
States saved Castro from something worse than the humiliation 
of defeat for his country, but instead of being grateful to the 
Washington Government, Castro concentrated his enmity on 
American citizens who were engaged in business enterprises in 
Venezuela under concessions before granted by the Venezuelan 
Government, and judgments aggregating millions of dollars 
were rendered against many of them by the Supreme Court at 
the direction of Castro. That the once banished and deposed 
President intends to inaugurate a civil war to regain the presi- 
dency, there is no doubt, for he has already declared such to 
be his purpose, and so long as he feels that the Monroe princi- 
ple is standing ready to protect his country against European 
interference with his policies, he is likely to get the United 
States into a deal of trouble. It would be hard to guess what 
will be the outcome of Zelaya's return to Nicaragua, but unless 
he is speedily caught and shot by the authorities, a bloody 
revolution may be looked for in the near future. It is known 
that he and Castro were much together while they were refu- 
gees in Europe, and it is believed they concocted plans for 



July 29, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



33 



the federation of the Central American States and several of 
the more northern States of South America. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



The Moroccan muddle is still the 
Of General Interest. overshadowing international com- 
plication, so far as Europe is con- 
cerned; not that any nation in interest is making extraordinary 
preparations for possible eventualities, but it is realized in all 
the capitals that the situation is one of fire and tinder in close 
proximity. 

All is quiet in the Balkan States, but the general situation is 
not unlike that in Turkey, except that the Mahommedans in Al- 
bania are beginning to take sides with their Christian country- 
men. 

The Die Zunkunft, of Berlin, calls the attention of the pan- 
German associations of the importance of the Portuguese colo- 
nies in Africa to Germany's expansion policy, and makes the 
startling announcement that a secret treaty exists between Ger- 
many and Great Britain to ultimately partition the colonies re- 
ferred to. 

There is a well-organized plan for the restoration of the Por- 
tuguese monarchy. Without protest from the Madrid Govern- 
ment, Portuguese troops are concentrating on the border to 
make war on the republic in the interest of the old monarchy. 
Portuguese in Brazil have sent a fund of $450,000 to aid in re- 
storing the monarchy. 

The Spanish Government is keeping close watch on the politi- 
cal movements of France. The belief prevails in Madrid that 
France is approaching a revolution, and that Spain should pre- 
pare to occupy Morocco. 

Constantinople is all ablaze because rifles and ammunition 
have been captured in Albania bearing the stamp of the 
national ordnance department of Montenegro, and the Sultan 
says this is proof positive that the Montenegrans are, by Gov- 
ernment aid and sanction, aiding the Albanian rebels, but so 
long as they have the sympathy of Italy and Austria it is not 
likely that anything serious will come of the charge against 
Montenegro. 

France, Germany and Japan have expressed a desire for a 
treaty with the United States covering practically all the points 
of the Anglo American arbitration pact. 



Dr. Deimel's unsurpassed underwear is growing in favor 

every day, and for many excellent reasons. It is pleasant to 
the skin, durable, sanitary in every respect and possesses the 
merit of not remaining damp and chilly when the wearer per- 
spires. It is adapted to every kind of weather, and suitable for 
climatic changes of temperature as well as to more equable 
climates. Measurements are taken at the Deimel linen mesh 
underwear store, 176 Sutter street, which insure good fits, which 
every fastidious and sensible man or woman desires. These 
measurements, being kept at the store, underwear may be or- 
dered by mail when the customer is out of town. 



J. Spaulding & Co., carpet beaters, are the pioneer steam 

machine carpet beaters in San Francisco. They make a specialty 
of relaying carpets, and give special attention to carpet dyeing. 
The office and works are located at 353-357 Tehama street. 
Telephones Douglas 3084 and Home J 2347. Immediate re- 
sponse to 'phone calls. 



MISS MERRIMAN'S SCHOOL 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL. FOR CURLS 
Primary, Grammar and High School. Oakland Public School Course 
of Study followed and State text-books used. Thorough preparation 
for College. Fall term begins July 11, 19U. 

624 El Dorado Avenue, Oakland 



Drew's Coaching School 

WEST POINT, ANNAPOLIS, ARMY 

College Preparatory. Teachers' Examinations. Civil Ser\ i*-e 
PAY EVENING 

91R Van Ness, San Francisco Franklin 



IRVING INSTITUTE 



1922 Franklin Street 
Pnone Franklin 3 1 I i? 
BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
32d year: all departments: terms reasonable. 
Now open for pupila. MISS ELLA M. PINKHAM 



THE HAMLIN SCHOOL 

A HIGH CLASS BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

Comprising a French School for Little Children, I'm. 
nedlate, High School and Post Graduate Departments, Hon 
Economics, Drawing, Painting and elocution. 

Accredited by University of California, by Leland Stanford Junior 
University and by Eastern Colleges. 

Courses in Singing, Instrumental Music (piano, violin, organ, harp, 
llute, etc.). Theory and Composition, Harmony, Sight Reading, Musi- 
cal Dictation, Choral and Orchestral Practice, etc. 

School re-opens Monday, August 7th. 



MISS SARAH D. HAMLIN, A. M., 



2230 Pacific Avenue, San Francisco. 



Phone West 546. 



MANZANITA HALL 

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA. 
A healthful home school for boys — thorough, efficient, growing, 
progressive. Location adjacent to Stanford University makes pos- 
sible a school life of unusual advantages and privileges. First 
Semester opens August 29, 1911. 
For catalogue and specific information, address 
W. A. SHEDD, Head Master. 



A. W. Bes\ 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1628 Bush Street 



Life Classes 
Day and Nlg-ht 



Illustrating; 
Sketching; 
Painting- 



Miss Harker's School PA ^o A ^° 

Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year begins August 15th. 
Catalogue upon application. 



INSTITUT BERTHELOT 

Ideally situated at 34 Rue Ribera. Paris. Mme. Leon Berthelot, 
Principal. Exceptional advantages for American girls desiring to 
complete their education in France. Superior facilities for thorough 
instruction In 

LANGUAGES, ART AND MUSIC. 
Beautiful surroundings, perfect equipment. For catalogue and ref- 
erences, address School Department, Literary Digest, also 

MR. THOS. WHITTAKER, Bible House, New York City. 



The Von Meyerinck School of Music 

Will be open during the Summer for Special Teachers' Courses for the study of 
the German Lied and French Repertoire 
COMPLETE VOCAL EDUCATION. 
Sight reading, musical history, dramatic action, piano, classes In 
German. French and Italian. Specially coached accompanists. STU- 
DIO RECITALS. 818 Grove St. Phones Market 1069; S. 1069. 



BOONE'S UNIVERSITY SCHOOL 

FOR BOYS BERKELEY 

Begins its thirtieth year August 9th. Accredited 

to Universities of California and Stanford, and five 
Eastern universities. For catalogue apply 

P. R. BOONE. MT29 Dur.nl A.enue. Berkeley. Cal. 



MISS HEAD'S SCHOOL 
2538 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal. 
Boarding and day school: college preparation; accredited to college; 
24th year. August 15. 1911. 

MARY E. WILSON. M. L.. Principal. 



SNELL SEMINARY 
2721 Charming Way, Berkeley. 
Boarding and Day School for girls. Beautiful location. Outdoor 
life. Accredited to L'niversily of California, Stanford, Wellesley, 
Mills and other collet reran opens August 9th. 

'.' A SXEI.L POfLSOX, Frin-'ip..:. 



STSTUMITTJ NO MORE SclMtlfie Talking will cure you. 

O 1 /VTO.jni-'IY Hundreds h»ve been cured under my 

instructions. Why Not You 3 \ v -ilars. 

M. I. HATFIELD >.6j GROVE STREET. OAKLAND. CAL. 



POPULAR HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS. 




Fitch Mountain Tavern 

NOW OPEN 



Three hours from San Francisco, on Russian river. Two miles 
of fine boating and bathing: livery and auto; hunting and fishing; 
dancing; good music; raise our berries, fruit, etc.; big fireplace; 
no bar. One and one-half miles from Healdsburg; 'bus meets 
trains. $3 a day, $12 to $18 per week. Special rates to families. 
Trout hatchery In connection. 

A. M. EWING, Healdsburg 

Headers when communicating with this resort will please mention 
the News Letter. 



CASA DEL REY 

SANTA CRUZ CAL. 

300-Room Fireproof Hotel. 

Large and well-appointed 
Grill Room facing the 
Beach. 

Everything new and first-class. 

AN UP-TO-DATE AND MODERN HOTEL 



Anderson Springs 

The springs that did the business in Lake County last year. Now 
open. The greatest resort for health and pleasure; the only natural 
mineral steam baths in Lake County. Natural hot sulphur and 
Iron Baths. Board — $10 to $14 per week. No extra charge for 
baths. How to reach the Springs — Take Oakland ferry at 7:40 
a. m., or S. P. train to Calistoga, arrive 11:30 for lunch; Spiers 
stage to springs; arrive at Anderson Springs at 4 p. m., distance 
21 miles. Fare, $7 round trip from San Francisco. Address all com- 
munications to MISS ROSE ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Mld- 
dletown, Lake County, Cal. 

NOTE. — Best route for autos Is via steamer to Vallejo, thence 
through Napa, Calistoga and Mlddletown. Perfect roads all the way. 



Make LAKE COUNTY by the Scenic Route 

The most comfortable way to make Lake County Is by Wm. Spier's 
stage line over the best mountain road in Cal. Grand scenery; easy 
carriages; careful drivers; round trip from San Francisco to Harbin, 
Anderson and Mira Vista. $7; to Adams, Selglers; Bonanza, Ho- 
bergs. Howard. Astorg, Spiers and Glenbrook. $9. Stages leave 
Calistoga 11:30 a. m., Sundays excepted. Half hour for lunch at 
Calistoga. Fifty pounds baggage allowed. Automobiles furnished 
when desired. Tickets on sale at Southern Pacific Office. 



Locate your family and enjoy week-end visits at 

Hotel Del Monte 

Pacific Grove Hotel Pebble Beach Lodge Rancho Del Monte 

All under the same maoigement and every gueat entitled to all Del Monte privileges 
and attractions, including GOLFING. MOTORING. TENNIS. BATHING. FISHING, 
ARCHERY and every outdoor spon. Take Del Monte Express coin* Friday. Saturday 
^nd Sunday, leaving San Francisco 8:05 a. m. or 2 p. m., arriving Del Monte 11:50 a. m. 
or 5:43 p. m . 

H. R. WARNER, Manager 



PARA1SO 

HOT SPRINGS 



Now's the Time to Visit 
California's Real Paradise 



Weather and scenery unsurpassed. Only 4 hours 
from San Francisco. Wonderful natural hot soda 
and sulphur; guaranteed for rheumatism, liver, kid- 
ney and all stomach troubles. New garage. Expert 
masseurs. Rates $12 to $16, including baths. 

Round trip $6.35, including auto. Roads perfect, 
autos already running daily. 

Leave Third and Townsend 8:05 A. M. First and 
Broadway, Oakland, 7:17 A. M. 

Booklets Peck-Judah; Bryan's 149 Montgomery Street or 



H. H. McGOWAN, Proprietor and Manager 

MONTEREY COUNTY 



The ANCHORAGE 

The Most Beautiful Spot In the Santa Cruz Mountains, 
for health and pleasure. First-class table, cottages, tents, tennis, 
croquet, dancing, fishing, swimming, etc.; 50 acres redwood, pine 
and madrone; altitude 1900 feet; rates $9 and $11. Meets trains by 
appointment at Alma Station, S. P.; round trip from San Francisco, 
$2.50. Address 

CLAUDE C. MOORE, Patchin, Santa Clara Co. 
Tel. Alma 57. 



BEACH HILL INN 



SANTA CRUZ. 



NOW OPEN. 



Popular family resort overlooking beach. Address: 

MISS A. PORTER. Santa Cruz. Cal. Phone Santa Cruz 238. 



HOWARD SPRINGS 

LAKE COUNTY. 42 MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Llthla for kidneys; hot Iron bath. 110 degrees, for rheumatism. The 
waters of the Hot Magnesia Spring have a wonderful record in the 
cure of stomach trouble. $12 to $18 per week. J. W. LAYMANCE, 
Prop., Howard Springs, Lake County. 



TENTS and FLAGS 

Why not buy your FLAGS from people who make them and save the Middle Man's 

profit. We have a large stock of FLAGS to select from and are convinced that our 

prices are the lowest. 

WEEKS-HOWE-EMERSON COMPANY 
51 Market Street Sin Francisco, Cal. 



July 29, 1911. 



POPULAR HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS. 



35 




THEt- QUEEN OF LAKE COUNTY RESORTS 

Highland Springs 

OPEN THE YEAR ROUND.. New and strictly first-class man- 
agement. Information and booklets regarding Highland Springs 
may be obtained at the Peck-Judah Free Information Bureau, 789 
Market street. For particulars, address W. H. MARSHALL, 
Proprietor, Highland Springs, Lake County, Cal. 



TALLAC and 
BROCKWAY 



Lake Tahoe 



The scenic resorts that have made 
Lake Tahoe famous. Open June 1st, 
under same management as in past 
years. Fishing season opens June 
1st; June fishing always best. 

LAWRENCE & COMSTOCK 
Tallac, Cal. and Brockway, Cal. 



A delightful home place but 
a short ride from San 
Francisco 

THE PENINSULA 

San Mateo California 

A 30 minute ride out of the 
fog and winds of the great 
city. 

Rates on application JAS. H. DOOLITTLE, Manager 



LAKE COUNTY AUTOMOBILE 
TRANSPORTATION GO. 

Passengers Carried by AUTOMOBILE and STAGES from PIETA 
to HIGHLAND SPRINGS, t.AKEFORT. KELSEYVILLE. SODA 
BAY. BARTLETT SPRINGS ami UPPER LAKE. Fine mountain 
road. Time for lunch at Pleta. Charges on automobiles extra in 
addition to regular one-way stage fare to Highland Springs. $1.50; 
Lakeport. $£: Kelseyville. $'-'. Tickets on sale at office Northwest- 
ern Pacific R. R. Co.. Ferry Bldg.. San Francisco, or S74 Market St. 
or address this office at Lakeport. Cal. 



Hotel del Coronado 

CORONADO BEACH 

CALIFORNIA 



Motto: "BEST OF EVERYTHING" 
Most Delightful Climate on Earth 



AMERICAN PLAN 

Summer Rates— $3.50 per day and upward 



Power boats from the hotel meet passengers from the north on 
the arrival of the Pacific Coast S. S. Company steamers. Golf, 
Tennis, Polo and other outdoor sports every day In the year. New 
700-foot ocean pier, for fishing. Boating and bathing are the very 
best. Send for booklet to MORGAN ROSS, Manager, Coronado 
Beach, Cal., or see H. F. NORCROSS, Agent, 334 So. Spring St., 
Los Angeles. Tel. A 6789; Main 3917. 




The favorite resort for 
tourists, sight seers, 
health and pleasure- 
seekers. A greater 
variety of mineral 
waters than In any 
other place In Amer- 
ica. The only natural 
mineral, steam and 
hammam bath, having 
great curative quali- 
ties. We positively 
cure rheumatism and 
stomach trouble. The 
hotel and bath houses have been thoroughly renovated and put In 
excellent shape for this season. Our table will be supplied with the 
best the market affords. The road from Cloverdale has been 
widened and put In splendid order for staging and automobiles. AH 
kinds of amusements, including dancing, every evening. Round- 
trip ticket good for six months via Cloverdale, $8. Good hunting 
and fishing. Rates. $2.50 to $3 per day. $14 to $16 per week. Child- 
ren from $7 to $9 per week. Special rates for families and long- 
termers. For further information, call on Peck-Judah Information 
Bureau. 789 Market street, or address R. H. CURRY, Proprietor, 
The Geysers, Cal. 



HARBIN SPRINGS 



NEW MANAGEMENT: NEWLY FURNISHED THROUGHOUT; 
NEW SERVICE. EXCELLENT TABLE. Our own garden, orchard 
and dairy. Famous hot and cold curative mineral waters free to 
guests. Masseur. Roger Cornell. Trout fishing; deer hunting; gym- 
nasium, livery, drives, trails, automobile trips, hotel, cottages, tents. 
Room, board and baths, J12 per week and up. Inquire at S. P. Of- 
fices: Examiner. 74 Geary St.: Peck-Judah's. 789 Market street; or 
BOOTH. CARR & BOOTH. Proprietors, Harbin Springs. Lake Co. 



SEIGLER 



HOT SPRINGS. Lake County. Natural hot baths for rheumatism, 
stomach trouble, malaria, etc. Swimming pond, baths free. $10 to 
$14 a week. Automobile livery. MISS M. SPAULDING. Seigler. 
Lake County, Cal. Information PECK-JUDAH CO., 789 Market 
street. San Francisco. 




POPULAR HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS. 



July 29, 1911. 



Butler — Is it your will to ride, m'lord ? M' Lord — Nay, 

'tis me wont. — Harvard Lampoon. 

"Are you going to join the new Progressive party?" "I 

don't have to. I belong to the winners." — Baltimore American. 

"It is said that impetuous people have black eyes." 

"Yes; and if they don't have them, they are apt to get them." — 
New York Mail. 

May — I wonder how Cholly manages to keep that wide- 
brimmed straw hat on in a wind like this ! Fay — Vacuum pres- 
sure. — Judge's Library. 

Gladys — The manager at the Frivolity selected twenty 

chorus girls in twenty minutes. Torry — My word! Isn't he 
quick at figures? — Variety Life. 

Teacher — Tommy, what is the feminine of the masculine 

"stag?" Tommy (whose mother is a society leader) — After- 
noon tea, ma'am. — Wisconsin Sphinx. 

Mamma — Johnny, I shall have to tell your father what a 

naughty boy you have been. Johnny — I reckon dad's right 
when he says a woman can't keep a thing to herself. — Ex. 

Mr. Millyuns (engaging valet) — I warn you that fre- 
quently I am exceedingly ill-tempered and gruff. Valet (cheer- 
fully) — That's alright, sir— so am I. — Sacred Heart Review. 

Crabshaw — If you insist on this new gown, I'll have to 

get it on credit. Mrs. Crabshaw — As long as it's going to be 
charged, dear, I may ?.s well get a more expensive one. — Life. 

The Chicago woman was on the witness stand. "Are you 

married or unmarried?" thundered the counsel for the defense. 
"Unmarried, four times," replied the witness, unblushingly. — 
Philadelphia Record. 

"I never judge a woman by her clothes," observed Bil- 

kins. "No," put in Mrs. B., sarcastically, "a man who gets to 
as many burlesque shows as you do wouldn't." — Milwaukee 
News. 

"Bridget," said Mrs. Grouchy, "I don't like the looks of 

that man who called on you last night." "Well, well," replied 
Bridget, "ain't it funny, ma'am? He said the same about you." 
—Catholic Standard and Times. 

Some probable investors were being shown over a build- 
ing estate in the country. "Come this way, gentlemen," the 
agent said, "on the rising ground, and you can see how the land 
lies." "Or the land agent," quietly replied one of the party. — 
fudge. 

"I read yesterday that Colonel Tamale, of the insurrec- 

tos, was shot in the back." "I was afraid that would happen 
to him. I read a statement in the newspaper the other day 
which said, 'Colonel Tamale back to the front.' " — Houston 
Post. 

Captain Hardress Lioyd, polo player, was talking in 

New York about the cessation of flogging at the English public 
school of Eton. "I am glad," he said, "that flogging is now 
done away with. Eton boys used to suffer a good deal from 
the birch. There was one Eton master in the '70's who flogged 
so severely that his death, when he came to die, was announced 
in the papers among the shipping news. They announced it 
under the head 'Loss of a Whaler.' " — New York Tribune. 



Dr. Agnew, rectal diseases exclusively. 

Francisco. 



821 Market street, San 



Hotel BEN LOMOND 

AND COTTAGES 

At Ben Lomond, Santa Cruz County, Cal. Beautifully located 
on the San Lorenzo river; finest of trout fishing, boating, etc.; only 
9 miles from beach, Santa Cruz. First-class accommodations, elec- 
tric-lighted rooms, buths attached. Terms, $2.50 per day. $14 
to $16 per week. Special rates to families. Fares — Sunday, round 
trip, $2.50; Saturday to Monday, $3; good to October 31, $3.50. For 
further particulars send for booklet or apply Peck-Judah Co., 789 
Market street. San Francisco. Take train 8:10 a. m., 3:15 p. m., 
3d and Townsend streets; 8:27 a. m.. 2:27 p. m.. Oakland pier. 

CHATFIELD & KASPAREK, Props. 



HOTEL BON AIR 



SPECIAL SATURDAY NIGHT DINNER 



6 TO 8 O'CLOCK 



Ready for guests under new management. 
Fifty minutes from San Francisco. 



M. A. SMYTHE. Lessee and Manager. 
Larkspur P. 0., ESCALLE, Marin County Phone: San Rafael 2431 




Hotel 
Belleclaire 



BROADWAY 
at 77th ST. 



SUBWAY 
79th Street 



i^^rfr^^ New York City 

HEADQUARTERS FOR CALIFORNIANS 

Thoroughly Modern and Fireproof 
FAMILY— TRANSIENT HOTEL 



Rates: with bath $2.50 per day up 

ELMER F. WOODBURY, Prop. 
Formerly of the Maryland, Pasadena Hotel St. Mark, Oakland 



Hotel Westminster 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. Fourth and Main Sts. 

American Plan Reopened. 

Rates per day, $2.50, rooms without bath 
Rooms with bath, $3, $3.50 and $4. 

European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up. 
With bath $1.50 and up. 

F. O. JOHNSON. Proprietor 



Hotel Sacramento 

SACRAMENTO, CALA. 

Elegant new fire-proof construction. Service as perfect as 
expert management can produce. 

ALBERT BETTENS. Proprietor. 



HOTEL de REDWOOD 

W THE HEART OF THE REDWOODS TWO 
AND ONE-HALF MILES FROM LAUREL 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS 

P.O. Address WRIGHTS. R. F. D., CAL. Telephone $8 to $12 per week 

J. E. SEROY. Lessee ind Manager Meet parties it train on notification 





NtaVf&jyaUDVElt 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coaet. 




VOL. LXXXII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, August 5, 1911 



Ni. 5 



Th» SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel, Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal.. Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where Information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 

London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements, or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not latir than Thursday morning. 



Put an administration banner above the door of the she- 
bang if you want to keep that liquor license. 

Dalton says he'll return from San Quentin a clean man. 

He will be a "cleaned" man by the time he has paid his law- 
yers. 

Another Southern city has gone dry. It is Charlotte, 

N. C, and the dryness relates to its water supply, which has 
practically vanished. 

"Walk into my beauty parlor," said the sleek professor, 

"and have the complexion that God gave you made to look 
like an old tan shoe." 

Wear any kind of a button to suit your fancy, your job 

or your necessities, but remember that the button can't tell what 
it sees when it is alone with you in the voting booth. 

The "beauty doctors," whose tribe drove poor May Ilg 

to death, are advised to organize a McCarthy campaign club in 
a hurry or get ready for a visit from the police. 

A fashionable Colorado girl slips a gold anklet into 

place and then has to have it filed off. There seems to be an 
anatomical puzzle in this item of smart set intelligence. 

After all his learned arguing on behalf of his pet and 

appointee, Wilde, Emperor Johnson decides to let him be ex- 
tradited. It is the autocrat's privilege to reverse his august self. 

Chicago is to have a soul hospital for the treatment of 

sinners. Eminent psychologers will sort out the applicants 
carefully so as to protect the plain sinner from the malignant 
and contagious cases. 

Dr. Wiley made the star mistake of his troubled career 

when he turned up the vice-president as a short-weight canner. 
Ever since then, "Sunny Jim" has been making warm weather 
for the unfortunate Wiley. 

"What is beer?" is the question which Doctor Wiley's 

department of the Government is trying to answer. The best 
evidence we can think of on the spur of the moment is to be 
found at any real, live, Sunday picnic. 

A wealthy San Franciscan risks his life to save three 

pounds of imported dog. The reason, however, is made plain 
by the statement that Re had promised the pup to his wife. We 
be an uxorious lot, we San Francisco males. 

John D. Rockefeller is related to have made the admis- 
sion that his wealth w?s in intolerable burden to him. There 
are something more than ninety millions of his fellow country- 
men who are willing to help him pack the load. 



A New York psj'chologist who has no fear of present or 

future punishment, says that the suffragette is a sexless thing. 
Perhaps, but how about the cradle-filling performances of 
which the votes-f or-women contingent is so proud ? 

One of the parties to a French affaire d'honneur being in 

jail, his place upon the bloodless field of Gallic chivalry was 
taken by a substitute who submitted to having his arm scratched 
with a sword point. French honor is more amusing than French 
humor. 

Rockefeller Institute surgeons announce that they have 

succeeded in transplanting vital tissue and organs from one 
animal to another. It is not a bad guess that before long the 
Oil King will have a new stomach, and will be able to eat at 
least one square meal per day. 

And now President David Starr Jordan of Stanford Uni- 
versity is lending himself to a crusade against tobacco as well 
as all kinds of alcoholic beverages. From the campus comes 
a ghostly echo as of a dead-and-gone student singing "Oh, who 
will smoke my meerschaum pipe?" 

Socialist Berger of Wisconsin has asked his fellow Con- 
gressmen to provide a $4 a week pension for every man and 
woman over sixty years of age. On that theory we shall all be 
working for the Government soon, and the Government will be 
supporting us all, with everybody in the bread line. 

The Coronation, the foreign war scare and political trou- 
bles at home have brought King George to the point of exhaus- 
tion, and they are bracing him up with oxygen. He has not 
the staying qualities of his illustrious sire, who did not let little 
matters like these disturb his enjoyment of the good things of 
life. 

Dalton, the disgraced Assessor of Alameda County, has 

read the law, the prophets and the newspapers to such purpose 
that, having been convicted, he begins to take his striped medi- 
cine without waiting on courts and technicalities. Thus the law's 
delays are curing themselves while the wise men search for 
remedies. 

On the same day that the new State Board of Control 

rips open a scandal in the State Printer's office, a member of 
the board of rippers is sued for the price of a suit of clothes. 
It's certainly a funny world, and the Johnson brand of "re- 
form," warranted free from benzoate of soda, is the most amus- 
ing on the market. 

Evolution may be alright when applied to the descent of 

man from monkeys, and the laws governing origin of species as 
discovered by Darwin in eons to come may evolve a chief of 
police who can comprehend the difference between a noon-time 
meeting of the Y. M. C. A. and an active, full-fledged gambling 
hell, but in the meantime, let us assume a little decency if we 
have it not, and quit advertising our cherished vices to the 
world. San Francisco's reputation for ungodliness may be 
safely trusted to endure with one-tenth part of the effort at 
present made by its daily newspapers. 




EjDITORJMj comment 



As usual, it cost a life to get public 
"Beauty Doctors." opinion and official energy roused 

to action against a commercialized 
evil. The charlatans and frauds operating as "beauty doctors" 
have long been known as such, but it was not until poor, morbid 
May Ilg went to her death that any serious attention was paici 
to them. 

Now and then some "beauty doctor's" habits or domestic af- 
fairs have lifted the lid on this phase of city life, and have re- 
leased a stench and revealed a condition of visible rottenness, 
but it seemed to be largely the concern of the "beauty shop" 
people, and the rest of the public did not care much. Now it is 
shown that these swindlers, working without any sort of regu- 
lation, have been imposing cruelly and shamefully upon women 
and girls, taking their money in return for no good done or for 
positive harm. 

There is a pathetic side to it — the side that exposes the plain 
woman seeking to make herself beautiful, which means seeking 
the admiration and attention that fall to her more fortunate sis- 
ters. Too often the "beauty doctor" has taken away her money, 
and with it any chance or hope she might have had for comeli- 
ness. Some may say that women should be content to live as 
they were made, and are well punished if, in their search for 
artificial pulchritude, they lose both money and what looks 
they possess. That is a hard and unfeeling opinion. The gods 
who made woman implanted in her heart the desire to be beau- 
tiful, just as they put into the souls of all mankind the deathless 
desire to behold beauty. 

The best way to get at the "beauty doctors" is to put them 
under rigid medical and police supervision and control. Their 
preparations and their methods should be passed upon with as 
much scientific exactness and with as much severity as the drugs 
and methods of any medical practitioner. The rogues and pre- 
tenders among them who merely use the "beauty shop" as head- 
quarters for other and less respectable business should be 
scourged out of the city altogether. Those who really operate 
upon complexions should be compelled to do it with just re- 
gard for the patient's health and with some knowledge of the 
properties of their remedies. 

JBT 
No feature of the composite site so 
happily chosen for the exposition 
seems to appeal more strongly to the 
popular imagination than that of the 
great boulevard system whereby the several parts of the site 
are to be made one. It appears to be the public idea and desire 
that this system shall at the same time bring together parts of 
the city heretofore separated by distance in some degree, but 
chiefly by topography. This, probably, is the idea and the de- 
sire of the exposition directors. 

Except for a casual and remote approach at the foot of Van 
Ness avenue, and for the comparatively private Presidio road 
running to a point above Fort Winfield Scott, the bay side of 
San Francisco is to be seen in nearby comfort and cleanliness 
only from the water. It is one of the best scenic assets of a 
city eminently picturesque in natural setting. The exposition 
boulevards will make it available and useful at last. That alone 
is a. permanent gain sufficient to justify the selection of a site 
in other respects less desirable. 

The boulevard part of the exposition plan will make it a 
world's fair much more interesting to the motorist and to the 
motor industry than any ever held, here or abroad. The com- 
modious and expeditious way to see the San Francisco exposi- 




San Francisco's 
New Boulevard. 



tion will be by automobile. That way visitors will have a maxi- 
mum of sight-seeing at a minimum of fatigue. That way they 
will get the most and the best of the view aside from the spec- 
tacles and attractions of the great show itself. 

In 1915 the question with the motorist coming from the in- 
terior or from the East will not be what touring he can do aside 
from the exposition to justify bringing along his car. He will 
realize that his own car will make him independent of rail 
facilities and indifferent to the weariness that goes with look- 
ing over an exposition, no matter how compact. Undoubtedly 
there will be every inducement on the part of the exposition 
managers and through private enterprise to encourage the bring- 
ing of motor cars to the fair. The motor owning visitor will be 
a distinct factor in the transportation side of the show as a pos- 
sible investor, and he will also be worthy of the attention of 
the interior. Good roads will unfailingly lure him out into the 
State, just as the exposition boulevards will induce him to use 
his own conveyance for the journey of delight along the bay and 
ocean shore and through the grounds. 

But there will be no limitation of the Boulevard system to the 
use and pleasure of the motor-owning few. The opportunities 
it affords will call for a great improvement upon existing local 
conditions as to hired motor vehicles. The rent service will be 
worked out and perfected so as to offer much better accommo- 
dations at much more attractive figures; the taxi facilities will 
be enormously improved and increased, and the auto-bus will 
be given a better chance than it has ever had. 

as- 
set it down to the credit of Mayor 
Some Facts and Figures. McCarthy that he is at least wise 
enough not to let the Hetch-Hetchy 
job go any further without registering into the official record 
some kind of a protest. No San Francisco journal of standing, 
except the News Letter, has had the hardihood to object to the 
spilling of public money on this uncertain project, so the con- 
clusion forces itself that the Mayor or his campaign managers 
do sometimes acknowledge the logic printed in these pages. 

At this week's meeting of the Board of Supervisors, the usual 
attempt was made to hand over to Ham Hall $652,000 of city 
coin for the Cherry Creek lands and rights deemed by the City 
Engineer necessary to the Hetch-Hetchy supply. — lands and 
rights now effectually tied up in court by the filing of suit 
against the vendors to the city. Hall and his crowd even offered 
to put $50,000 in escrow to protect the city against loss— $50,000 
to guarantee the title to property selling at $652,000! No won- 
der the Mayor gagged at this proposition. Ham Hall's outfit 
has already handled $400,000 of public money, and it may ulti- 
mately get enough more to make it run above a cool million. 
What the city will eventually and ultimately get for this con- 
sideration is not a question offering much occasion for munici- 
pal thanksgiving. 

At the same session of the board the City Attorney was 
finally allowed the $15,000 he asked to fix up the city's Hetch 
Hetchy cases for the army engineers now at work looking into 
the whole question of our Sierra needs and the possible sources. 
This money, as the News Letter has already pointed out, is 
supposed to go for the accumulation and preparation of data 
that are or ought to be in the files of Engineer Manson, and that 
could be made ready in a short time by any competent deputy. 

Still further, the board authorized another appropriation that 
must be charged up to Hetch-Hetchy — $36,000 to "investigate 
various sources of water supply for San Francisco," this in ac- 
cordance with the order of the Department of the Interior. How 



August 5, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



much chance is there that this "investigation" will turn up any- 
thing unfavorable to Hetch-Hetchy or actually hurtful to Sprinp, 
Valley? How much chance is there that it will reveal any of 
the obvious advantages of the Sierra Blue Lakes proposition, 
the cheapest, quickest, purest and surest source yet offered to 
the city ? 

Examination of the Auditor's accounts with relation to the 
Hetch-Hetchy myth shows some totals that should stagger the 
taxpayers. Up to June of this year, the Phelan-Hall-Manson 
proposition had already cost the city in money the sum of $454,- 
218.49. Of this amount the modest City Attorney had drawn 
for expenses $1,000, while the busy City Engineer had got his 
hands into the cash box for expenses aggregating $24,267.68. 
This week's appropriations add to the sum $51,000, and the be- 
ginning of the end is not yet in sight. 

All this, bear in mind, is preliminary expense. It brings the 
city no vested rights, gives it no assurance that it will ever have 
a drop of water from the Tuolumne source, or own anything 
therein. It is not surprising that the agents of Spring Valley 
tell that monopoly's customers that water will never be cheaper 
than it is in San Francisco, and may be much more costly. It 
is a fine outlook for the municipality. 



The Next Mayor. 



Four years of McCarthy or four 
years of Rolph — four years of class 
government, or four years of repre- 
sentative popular government ? 

The citizens of San Francisco will answer these questions 
soon at the polls — they may answer them fully and finally at 
the primary on September 26th. It will help them to the right 
conclusion if they observe the manner in which McCarthy and 
Rolph prepare themselves for the issue. 

McCarthy puts himself up for the office. He chases it with 
every weapon and device and means known to the bad old kind 
of politics. Nobody but McCarthy asked him to run. The man 
seeks the office. Rolph might have been Mayor now in McCar- 
thy's place if he had listened to the united voice of his fellow- 
townsmen two years ago urging him to stand for nomination. 
He is a candidate now only after the most powerful pressure has 
been put upon him by all classes of a community that has en- 
dured two years of a Government that has done nothing tangible 
but politics. In Rolph's case, the office seeks the man. He 
makes no alliances with the vice and crime of the town, misuses 
no trust, persuades nobody with promises of jobs, threatens no- 
body with loss of privilege or license. His candidacy is orderly, 
decent, self-respecting. There is no class in it. The man who 
has made up his mind to vote for Rolph has done so because of 
what Rolph stands for rather than what Rolph is. 

And yet if it came to matching deed with deed, performance 
with performance, McCarthy the official would have to give 
place to Rolph the private citizen. McCarthy has promised 
much, has had all the Dower to do much, and has done — nothing. 
That is, he has done nothing that is creditable to his own admin- 
istration. He got a good and competent man back out of private 
life to rehabilitate the police department, and then pitched him 
out on the shabbiest and most hypocritical of pleas because he 
would not do McCarthy politics and help cover up the rascalities 
of the McCarthy administration. 

Having declared himself for regulation of the city's unavoid- 
able evils, he has capitalized them for political purposes, and 
once more, through his affiliations and acts, the city's name is a 
by-word and a hissing among decent men and decent communi- 
ties. 

All the time Rolph, the citizen, has been in the thick of every 
good fight for the advancement of his city's interests. Rolph's 
name is written large and high in every great public movement 
that has accomplished anything toward the development and 



betterment of the town, and he has never asked anything of it — 
he does not ask anything now. He would vastly prefer to go on 
attending to his own business, giving freely of his surplus time 
and surplus energy to private activities for the public good than 
to assume the duties and responsibilities of the office that seeks 
him. 

There is a reason why McCarthy wants the office. There is 
a reason why the thoughtful and observant citizenship of the 
town wants Rolph to have the office. Look at the two men, their 
methods, their performances, their affiliations, and you will 
see those reasons. 

W 
The reorganization committee of the 
California Safe Deposit. California Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company is being hampered by un- 
warranted reports. Whether the efforts succeed or not, there is 
absolutely no question in the minds of those who know the facts 
that W. J. Bartnett has been faithful and untiring in his efforts 
to reorganize the bank. Those who accuse him of bad faith 
either do not know the facts or are so unreliable as not to merit 
serious attention. No responsible person who has been con- 
nected with this movement can have failed to learn and appre- 
ciate Bartnett's unceasing efforts in its behalf or the tremendous 
amount of good work which he has done. 

The reorganization was put forward and is still being ad- 
vanced by W. J. Bartnett and the better element of both de- 
positors and stockholders in the best of faith. 

The Depositors' Association is only one of a number of strong 
associations of depositors, and the depositors' associations were 
represented in the reorganization committee. 

Early in this year the reorganization work reached a point 
where the conditions imposed by the Eastern bankers had been 
fulfilled. Their counsel, Rathbone, submitted to them a volumi- 
nous written report, concluding with his advice that the condi- 
tions imposed had been substantially complied with and that 
the matter was in shape to conclude. Final conferences then 
took place between Wilson and Bartnett and the bankers, with 
the view of closing the transaction and reopening the bank. 

At that time, however, all the Gould stocks began to develop 
weakness in the market, and Western Pacific, which had for the 
preceding year maintained steadily a price around $25 per 
share, fell below $20. The bankers then said that since the 
Western Pacific stock (41,500 shares) held by the Safe Deposit 
Company represented one-half the assets for which $2,000,000 
in new capital was being paid, and since they were taking it 
over at $25 per share, they wished it to be made secure at that 
figure in order that the new bank might not be speculating in 
uncertain securities, and in order that it might be sure of its 
ability to liquidate the time payments promised depositors un- 
der the reorganization plan. 

The Reorganization Committee is doing everything possible 
to save to the depositors all moneys involved by rehabilitating 
the bank. This result can only be achieved by allowing the 
committee ample time and opportunity to place before outside 
capital a fair and square business proposition. 

3B- 
Perhaps the most popular feature 
All Want Civic Centers, of the adopted plan for the Pan- 
ama-Pacific Exposition is the idea 
of a civic center. Artistic grouping of public buildings of 
striking architecture, beauty and commodious appointment, will 
not only reflect the progressive spirit of the city's citizenship, 
but will add greatly to the ethical and esthetic quality of the 
great metropolis of the Pacific Coast, and what is even more, 
such a civic center as contemplated will add immensely to the 
attractive and tangible assets of the municipality. A central 
edifice surrounded by supplementary public buildings of pro- 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 5, 1911. 



portions and beauty in harmony with the prospective increase 
in area and population and wealth of San Francisco would 
form a municipal center whose attractiveness and influence 
would reach to the four quarters of the globe. 

It matters but little whether San Francisco has set .the pace 
or not, but it is comforting to know that more than one munici- 
pality has concluded that the San Francisco way is the normal 
way of doing things in American cities. That is to say, beau- 
tification and public convenience should be the first considera- 
tion when making public improvements. Cleveland, O., has 
already partially completed a civic center, and New York City 
has an architect at work drawing plans for a similar public im- 
provement, taking the City Hall, which is not only a magnifi- 
cent building, architecturally, but is situated in an attractive 
park, as the basic point and supplementing it by constructing 
many other buildings, including a magnificent structure for a 
"down-town" Postoffice, the whole to give the city attractions 
which even skyscrapers fifty or more stories high cannot give, 
for artistically grouped buildings of pleasing design suggest a 
quality of refinement very unlike the inspiration that is born 
of piles of cold concrete and steel even if they do scrape the 
clouds with their stately heads. Of course, the esthetic and 
ethical lesson a civic center teaches depends upon harmonious 
grouping of the buildings, and to what extent the public will 
be benefited by them. But the people of San Francisco and of 
California have no reason to expect otherwise than that the 
Civic Center at Van Ness avenue and Market street will be 
among the most attractive and substantial of the great variety 
of interesting and educational factors that shall go to make the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition the most generous and elaborate 
collections of the handiwork of mechanical genius, science and 
art that the world has ever seen. 

JBT 

Seattle, like San Francisco and 
"Burning the Hammer." nearly all cities and communities, is 

cursed by the presence and loud 
mouths, in the vernacular of the West more particularly, of 
what are called "knockers." They are generally men in whose 
opinion the public never does the right thing. In the rebuild- 
ing of San Francisco, these fault-finders criticised some of the 
new buildings because they were too high ; others because they 
looked "squatty," and all of them represented an extravagant 
expenditure of money; they could never be made to pay even 
a small interest on the outlay, and in any event they would 
exert a bad influence on the country. In fact, nothing was be- 
ing done with business intelligence, and the end of it would be 
the poor house for city and people. This class of the city's 
inhabitants were rightly called "knockers," for they delighted 
in disparaging every effort of the energetic citizens to further 
the welfare and well-being of San Francisco. 

It seems that Seattle had altogether too many "knockers" 
for the good of the city, and to rebuke them in a way that was 
likely to silence their vicious tongues an anti-knockers' club 
was organized, and a program agreed upon, but one perform- 
ance seems to have been all that was necessary to cure the 
"knocking" habit, and do it in an educational way. The club 
was composed of several hundred of the first business men 
of the city. One evening they quietly formed themselves into 
marching order, and headed by a brass band playing a funeral 
march, the procession solemnly wound its way to a large vacant 
place where a roaring fire was burning in a wide and deep pit. 
A wagon drawn by four horses moved rapidly to the front, 
when willing hands seized an immense hammer, weighing 600 
pounds, and cast it in the fiery pit. By this time more than 
100,000 people had "joined in" to see what the odd perform- 
ance meant, but it required only a short address to explain to 



the people that the burning hammer was a symbol of the tool 
that enemies of Seattle used to "knock" the city and the State 
of Washington. The witty speaker concluded his short remarks 
by saying that it was in the heart of public sentiment to cast 
every "hammerer" into the little lake of fire that they might be 
cleansed from the evil of "knocking" other people's business. 

■3S- 

Chicago has adopted a principle of 
Is a City a Sovereign ? municipal Government, which is up- 
held by the Supreme Court of Illi- 
nois, that other city Governments might inaugurate to their 
good. In a way, it is Roosevelt's theory of national, state and 
community Government, and its meaning is, that in the absence 
of a law specifically prohibiting a contemplated policy, the 
Government may assume that the thing may be done, provided, 
however, the people want it done that way. Some time ago 
the Mayor of Chicago and his legal staff could find no act of 
Congress or of the State Legislature directly prohibiting the 
controlling of street and elevated railways by the city, and upon 
the theory that what the law does not prohibit may be done, if 
done by the municipality in the interests of the people, and as- 
suming that the city's municipal power was sovereign, the au- 
thorities went ahead and forced the public utilities to give 
the public a square deal in service, fares and accommodations. 
The railroads protested and denied the right of the city to exer- 
cise a supervisory control over them. But the people backed 
the city Government, and the roads yielded without a legal 
battle. 

A few days ago the people backed the Mayor in his demand 
that the gas company furnish gas at 70 cents a thousand feet. 
An ordinance was passed to that effect, but the people de- 
manded that it should be effective at 70 cents for not more than 
five years, after which the maximum rate should be 68 cents. 
Of course the gas company rushed off to the courts for an in- 
junction restraining the enforcement of the ordinance. The 
argument of the city was that there being no national or State 
law against such legislation by the city of Chicago, and as the 
municipal power of the city was sovereign, and that as the 
people of Chicago demanded such an ordinance, no Federal or 
State court had authority to rule otherwise, unless it assumed 
the right to make a ruling to destroy Chicago's sovereign right 
in the premises and confer sovereignty upon the gas and street 
railroad companies. The Supreme Court recognized Chicago's 
sovereignty and right to regulate the street railroads and fix a 
maximum price for gas. This is the first time in the history of 
municipal Governments in this country that in the absence of 
laws to the contrary a city might exercise her sovereign right 
to do her own law-making. 



-f 




7//lll\# 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 



314 SACRAMENTO STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 






fcX TOWN CRIER 




To obtain the great and powerful truths that have 

rounded out civilization, the work and genius o£ no one man 
sufficed any more than the solved problems of energy and in- 
finity, until fitted one into another, sufficed for more than a 
hint to the complete whole. The entire drift of science and 
history of progress teaches the same lesson, and to no branch of 
science do these broad principles apply more than to politics. 
If in recognition and furtherance of this principle, Mr. McCar- 
thy demands from each integral part of the municipal machine 
a contribution to the general fund proportionate to the best that 
is in it, and that best comes from the breeches pocket, is the 
great man to be chided therefor ? 

By strict attention to business — his own and other peo- 
ple's — Mr. Manker, of Illinois, within a very short period suc- 
ceeded in becoming a bank president, an inventor and a thief. 
But not a criminal. We have his word for that. Mr. Manker 
expected to make sufficient from his invention to repay his 
depositors, and would have done so had not the invention gone 
back on him. The invention is the criminal. But Mr. Manker 
is in jail, and all the kind things being said of him by sympa- 
thetic reporters will not get him out again. I am sorry for Mr. 
Manker, for he did not intend to do wrong — he just did it. 

A professional wit, permanently employed to assault 

the readers of a local paper, throws this at them: "Go to the 
postage stamps, consider their ways of sticking together, and 
be wise." This is an aphorism of a very high order. Some 
people, to be sure, may have a belief that postage stamps are 
not at all improved by their "ways of sticking together," but 
for their benefit I proffer the information that this gentleman's 
sayings are not always to be pursued with seriousness, as the 
blinding, phosphorescent gleam of their wit not infrequently has 
the effect of completely concealing their wisdom. 

To Subscriber. — That some sequential good should crop 

out where unintended is one of the mysteries of a Divine Provi- 
dence. The honesty, independence and cleanliness of a journal 
is its vitality, and the destruction of these qualities marks the 
downfall of its usefulness. The confidence of the public once 
lost is as difficult of recovery as the credit of a broken bank; 
once the drafts of the public upon its pages are dishonored by 
falsehood, it may afterward serve as a convenience, but never 
as a necessity. 

Life insurance, like religion and some other good things, 

has to be urged upon humanity before it is appreciated and em- 
braced. They are acquired tastes. No one is born into the world 
with a yearning for them, but when understood, no one can get 
too much. For this reason it is a good thing that the supply 
is practically inexhaustible. The priest and the insurance agent 
are doing good work for the Lord's people. If their pay is not 
very big now, let us hope that their recompense will be all that 
can be desired in the hereafter. 



"The good citizen in a community," states a contempor- 
ary, "can materially assist in maintaining good practices if he 
will come to realize how much it is his duty to do so." This is 
true, but good citizenship is about the most inert force that is 
known. Good citizenship seems to assume that, to retain its 
reputation for goodness it must emulate the state of being 
ascribed to the "good Indian." Good citizenship will not arouse 
itself even in its own defense, and continues to permit flagrant 
violations of the law, although if it would really arouse itself, 
it has the power to control the situation and to produce the ideal 
conditions of which the good citizen seems content to dream, 
but for which he will not put forth concerted effort. He's a 
joke to his evil-minded enemies, and is their easy victim. The 
real trouble with him, it is to be feared, is that he is both selfish 
and lazy. 

A contemporary says that he favors "the abandonment 

of offensive personalities in journalism, but what will become 
of writers of the 'Town Crier' stamp?" As the clumsy, slow- 
moving ox-cart of our daddies is a harmless vehicle compared 
with the up-to-date automobile, and seldom hurts anybody, so 
the heavy, lumbering wit of my contemporary, contrasted with 
intelligent criticism, shows up without capacity for mischief 
and makes no wound. The Town Crier has never been reduced 
to a poverty of resource 'hat would invite the employment of 
offensive personalities. The poor satisfaction of this mean ex- 
pedient is resigned to those of his opponents whose choice of 
weapons favors the meat-axe in preference to the rapier. 

1 am tempted to remind those responsible for present 

conditions tha* it is a vital sin not to provide our growing city 
with water and pipes and hydrants to avert that awful calamity, 
a general conflagration. We have the men and the appliances, 
but they must have an abundant supply of water and all hy- 
drants necessary. No one can imagine the strain upon the fire 
department and its chief when the alarm is from a quarter illy 
provided in these respects. If, on the top of this, a second 
alarm is turned in from a similar locality, the burden is dou- 
bled. The problem to them is hard enough with every resource 
and perfection of appliance; to tie their hands by omitting any 
detail is rank foolishness. 

Everything looks well for 1915. Even the kickers are 

falling into line that an unbroken front may be presented. The 
duty of the hour is present to everybody. The appropriate time 
is at hand. Such as do not see the importance of united action 
should be treated as ghouls of the battlefield who thrive by the 
spoliation of the dead and wounded. There should be no dis- 
tinction or size or financial ability. All are interested in the 
common welfare, and the press, in performance of a duty to the 
public that supports it, should turn its every energy against such 
as cannot see the path so clearly pointed out by the logic of 
events. 



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Sir Wilfrid Laurie, the Premier of Canada, upon whom reci- 
procity now depends, is the man of the hour. Having a speak- 
ing acquaintance with the gentleman, and to show how different 
politicians can be, we will endeavor to describe him for the 
benefit of the readers of tnis page. If you stood he and Teddy 
Roosevelt on either end of a plank, they would properly enough 
represent the two most opposite poles of temperament, method 
and manner. The Canadian would make the better showing. 
Always immaculately garbed, suave and subtle to his finger- 
tips, handsome as men are rarely handsome, and of a personal- 
ity significant even in the slightest movement of his hand, it 
would be impossible not to pause to regard him. And should 
he commence to speak, it would be even more impossible not to 
listen; for he is a veritable silver-tongued master of oratory, 
and his language has at cnce the grace of old France and the 
fine virility and reserve of the North. He never shouts, never 
tries to be theatrical, for in himself he is more significant. His 
speeches are the sword play of a master. His is a fine edge, 
and his intuition is as far and sure as that of a woman. It is 
his art to move against the most vulnerable point and win. 
Never for an instant does his mastery bray. He prefers to do 
things easily and gracefully, and usually accomplishes them in 
that manner, while his adversary is still waving his hands; but 
he has the fire to do them anyway. His reserve forces, indeed, 
are something that no enemy yet has been able to bring out 
fully. At the very bottom of him he might be a devil or a god. 
He is the imperturbable sort, who would always smile in the 
face of the loudest mob. Even in England they call him "the 
aristocrat." It is a compliment to his personality and manners. 
His ideas are democratic. He is the Beau Brummell, the Ches- 
terfield, and the Gladstone of Canada all in one. And there is 
not a Canadian who is not, in his heart, proud of him. 
V B S 

Goddard and the Girl ! It seems too bad about Goddard and 
the Girl. It also seems too bad about Goddard's wife. All 
three, it would appear, acted sincerely. Between Goddard and 
the Girl it was a case of love; between Goddard and his wife 
a case of companionship. Companionship is alright till the 
real thing comes along. Most affinity cases are another sort of 
companionship. But in the instance of Goddard and the Girl it 
was different. They gave up everything for each other. In 
fine, they furnished the proofs, and, outside of fancy and in- 
fatuation, there is such a thing as real iove left in the world. It 
will require a few generations less commercial than the present 
to revive it generally in this country, but it still exists in in- 
stances and between certain pairs. Goddard and the Girl were 
such a pair; the pity ot it being that Goddard's wife was such 
a fine woman. Perhaps she was too fine. She did what no 
other woman in a thousand would have had the strength to do. 
She undertook to make a friend of the Girl and teach her the 
error of her ways. But no one has yet been able to teach the 
heart in its finest revealments anything yet. The Girl wanted 
to do as Mrs. Goddard would have had her done, but she clung 
to Goddard. Mrs. Goddard was obliged to call in the law. The 
law separated Goddard and the Girl, and the law will likewise 
get Mrs. Goddard a divorce. She is strong enough not to be 
hurt. But the Girl is hurt, extremely. 
B S 5 

San Quentin is a world all to itself. It is possessed of a psy- 
chology stranger and of greater interest, undoubtedly, than that 
furnished by any other human conglomeration of its numbers in 
the State. Ranging all the way from brutality to genius, every- 



thing is enclosed there, and all beholding each other. It breaks 
hearts, and it becomes a home. It crushes ambition to the 
ground with every hope and dream that pertains to the soul, 
and, in other cases, it furnishes rest from the world and self- 
effacement. Its heartbeats and its emotions are countless, its 
tragedies fill the atmosphere; but in spite of every favorable 
condition, souls stili live there — aye, and dream. The capacity 
of human nature is infinite. Its resources go below Hell and 
above Heaven, and such, too, its hopes. Over in the big prison, 
Abe Ruef teaches Sunday-school. The other day the doors 
opened to admit Dalton of Oakland. Knowing each other, it 
was only natural that, in meeting, the two should endeavor to 
show nonchalance and courage. This is what was actually said : 

"Dalton," tendered Ruef, "you are invited to attend my Sun- 
day-school class." 

"Thanks," responded Dalton, almost merrily. "But how could 

I hope to reach Heaven through such a Ruef?" 
S "S 5 
James Rolph, Jr., will formally open his campaign for Mayor 
at a mass meeting at the Globe Theatre, in the heart of the Mis- 
sion district, on the night of August the twelfth. From that 
time till the last ballot is cast, he will be an extremely busy 
man. He is not making his own campaign so much, however, 
as others are making it for him. Before it is finished, it will 
have become an avalanche. He has become a Fair necessity. 
Though it is his intention, he scarcely needs to make a fight of 
it. The present Mayor, on his part, has been desperately work- 
ing for re-election for months. The blatant mistakes he has 
made only show how poor a diplomat he is, and that in spite of 
his cunning. He might fool a few men, but he was never meant 
to fool many. Nor will he fool them on election day. His big 
stick is a dummy. He really fears everything, and in his own 
way, whatever that proves to be, will fight to the last round of 
ammunition. Can anything be dirtier than politics dragged in 
the mud. Rolph, however, intends that his campaign shall be 
above board in every respect, and it will be. With regard to 
his opponent, he had only the following to say. C. F. Mark- 




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August 5, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



with had remarked to him that he thought he was slow in bo- 
ginning election work, as McCarthy had opened his campaign 
long ago. 

"Let us hope that it will remain open," replied Rolph. 
5 5 » 

What is fame, asks the wise man, and the bell-boy replies. It 
happened so at the St. Francis Hotel, where most everything 
happens. And, talking of happenings, who can forget Raymond 
Duncan, who would act for real money and live musically, ac- 
cording to the ethics of ancient Greece. Only when Duncan 
was here, he did not quite make a living at it. He is coming 
to try again. But this time he has sent his special envoy ahead, 
and the envoy is registered at the St. Francis Hotel. His name 
is George Papageorge — which is certainly quite a name, by 
George!— and his business is to boost. Among others, he has 
letters to Jack London, who wrote some things, and also made 
a reputation plagiarizing. Anyway, he is supposed to be fam- 
ous, and firmly believes he is. But bell-boys have to be tipped 
to a thing. This one didn't know Raymond Duncan either, who 
believes that every mother should begin with him by teaching 
her offspring the A B C's of his faith. But mothers of the 
land are apparently very careless. This is what the envoy said 
to the beil-boy, and the bell-boy said to the envoy. 

"Can you tell me where Jack London lives?" asked the lat- 
ter. "I am a disciple of the great Raymond Duncan, and I have 
a letter to London." 

"I know where London is," replied the lad, "but not Jack. 
"A letter will travel to London by the mail." 

The envoy smiled pityingly. "It is Jack London, the author, 
I mean." 

The boy scratched his head. "I don't seem to be able to 
place him," he said, "but he may be staying on Third street." 

"He wrote 'The Call of the Wild,' " supplied the envoy. "He 
was once a tramp, but he is now a great writer." 

But the bell-boy had had enough. "Oh, go on," he said. 
"If he wrote any 'call of the wild' he must have been a bell-boy. 
I suppose you are going to act it for him." 

» S 5 

In Judge Shortall's court, the other morning, a man was 
brought before the magistrate to answer to the charge of drun- 
kenness and vagrancy. Said the policeman : 

"Sure, your Honor, he was tryin' to clane up Kearny street 
with himself as a mop. An' whin I asked him why he didn't go 
home, he said he was so busy tryin' to make the town go dry 
he didn't have time. Sez I to meself : 'He's one of thim danger- 
ous anarchists,' and locked him up." 

The Judge turned to the prisoner before him. "What,'' said 
he, "is your name?" 

"John Jones," answered the man. 

"And where," asked the Judge, "do you live?" 

Jones looked his di?gust. "Where do I live?" he repeated; 
"why, I don't live — hie — anywhere in p'ticular. I'm a traveler. 
Never stay — hie — very long in any place. Why, Judge. I've 
traveled from pole to pole — hie " 

But here the Judge rudely interrupted. 

"What," asked he, "is your occupation?" 

"Lineman," answered the prisoner. And they do say he got 
thirty days foi making josh init the Judge. 



Milk Chocolates a^e "Perfection in confection." Take 

HER a box; she will appreciate your good taste in selecting 
Milk Chocolates. To be had at any of Geo. Haas & Sons' four 
candy stores. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Pears' 

Pears' is essentially 
a toilet soap. A soap 
good for clothes won't 
benefit face and hands. 
Don't use laundry soap 
for toilet oi bath. That 
is, if yo? i value clear 
skin. 

Pears' is pure soap 
and matchless for the 
complexion. 

Sold in town and village 



Schwabacher-Frey 
Stationery Co. 

NOW OPEN 

In their new and commodious quarters, 

541-543 MARKET STREET 

Opposite Sansome 




H. BETTE 



Ladies Tailor 



and 

Habit Maker 

IMPORTER OF FINE NOVELTIES 

Fall Importations and Styles just received 
270 SUTTER STREET Opposite White Home 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 5, 1911. 



Tkg jBastt=M®inrn<Bdls Vkntt A lM@w 



Thursday being the day set apart by immemorial custom to 
the rest and recreation of the mind, Mr. and Mrs. Just-Married 
were wont to make that evening one of such mild festivity as 
came within their conception of the term "bat" by dining at 
one of those places lumped under the dark designation of 
"Bohemian." However, the subterranean character of these 
banquets was slightly mitigated by the fact that Mrs. Just- 
Married — who was new to the house-keeping idea — insisted 
that they should be paid for frcm the weekly sum known as 
"the housekeeping money," a proceeding well calculated to put 
a check on any tendency toward undue extravagance. 

Indeed, Mrs. Just-Married was so very new that when her 
maid came to her early one Thursday afternoon with a tale un- 
derstood by her mistress to concern the last struggles of a dying 
grandmother, and which, incidentally, furnished the peg on 
which was bung a request for two weeks' wages in advance, the 
money was paid; but the countenance which greeted Mr. Just- 
Married on his home-coming was chastened to the point of pen- 
siveness. 

"No, we can't go to Guigan's," was her reply to his sugges- 
tion concerning a place to dine; "we can't afford to; I had to 
pay two weeks in advance to la belle Helene," such being the 
title by which her employers designated their maid, partly be- 
cause her own name was unpronounceable and partly, according 
to the Just-Married, "because she was as ugly as a hedge- 
fence." 

"Two weeks!" that gentleman exclaimed; "two weeks? 

Nancy, you are the original " Then, as Mrs. Just-Married 

reached for her pocket-handkerchief: "Oh, of course, dear, I 
only mean that you were too easily deceived and too kind- 
hearted — far too kind-hearted. What was the principle of rea- 
soning on which she based this extortion?" 

"She said her grandmother was dying — at least I think she 
said 'grandmother' — anyhow she needed the money," answered 
the wife, flourishing the now discovered handkerchief in an an- 
ticipatory manner. Then brightening: "But listen, Jack, she 
was telling me something awfully interesting while she hooked 
me up the back to go to market — I understood her, for I made 
her repeat it six times, so I should be sure to get it right. It 
was about a perfectly wonderful Hungarian orchestra in the 
East-side, where they have music and a fine dinner, mind you, 
with a glass of wine thrown in, for,"- — dramatically Mrs. Just- 
Married paused before the significant words, "35 cents." 

"Ump," Mr. Just-Married grunted skeptically, "and you be- 
lieve that?" 

"Of course I do; what reason would she have for telling me a 
lie ?" Then as her husband's grunts changed to open merriment, 
she continued hopefully: "Anyhow, perhaps we might discover 
some delicious little place like the Diggses did — don't you re- 
member the Italian place they took us to where the spaghetti 
was made with rancid butter? They always boast about its be- 
ing their 'discovery.' Besides, dear, this place is so cheap that 
it would be easier for you — because you've got to pay for the 
dinner to-night ; I gave every cent I had to la belle Helene. Do 
you really mind very much?" 

It is to be inferred he didn't, for they went. 

"It's perfectly fascinating," Mrs. Just-Married declared, af- 
ter the proprietor had bowed them to a seat in a manner 
"the quintessence of dignity and fatness," according to her 
husband. "Quite terribly delightful. Just look at the violin- 
ist! Isn't he just like a romance?" 

"No," rejoined her husband, gloomily; "he seems to me more 
like a tragedy — for other people." 

The lady pouted. "Well, I think he's romantic," she insisted. 
"Really, it seems to me the most absolutely Bohemian of all 
the places we have tried." 

"Nancy, you should devote your leisure time to the pursuit 
of geography, and learn that what you miscall Bohemia is 
merely the noise made by the silly idiots," casting a baleful 
glance toward the far corner of the room, "who delight to con- 
sume the ordinary bad food of commerce if doctored with the 
paprika of the wily proprietor's native Hungary. I say, what 
is the matter!" for his wife had suddenly grasped him by the 
arm. 



"Look down at the end table," she gasped. "The one in the 
far corner!" 

"Where the people are making such a beastly racket?" 

His wife nodded energetically. "That's the one. You see 
the girl whose back is toward us ? Well, it's our belle Helene !" 

"By Jove, I believe it is! But how the dickens could you tell 
her?" 

"How? How?" Mrs. Just-Married repeated scornfully. "Why, 
she has on my very best ba^ette — the one I wanted to wear to- 
night my own self, only I couldn't find it anywhere." 

"It's la belle Helene, sure enough," assented her husband, 
"though personally I can't swear to the barette. I say, which 
one of the others should you pick as the winner of the dying 
grandmother stakes?" 

But his wife paid no heed. "She's told me a most frightful 
lie," she moaned, more in sorrow than in anger. "Now I'll have 
to discharge her — and she made such good lyonnaise potatoes." 

"She is turning around!" said his wife in an agonized whisper 
— lean your head over to me so she can't see you." 

But it was too late — la belle Helene in turning to speak to 
some one sitting behind her, had caught sight of her employers. 



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and California Advertiser 



Then followed a few seconds apparently devoted to somewhat 
heated argument with her three companions, the Just-Marrieds 
plainly being the subject. Suddenly she rose and came quickly 
toward them, beaming like a full moon. 

"You lik' dis?" was her cordial greeting as she swept a pro- 
prietary glance about the restaurant, meanwhile taking rather 
than receiving two limp hands and shaking them vigorously; 
"one fine place, no ?" Then before either could reply, she rushed 
back to her former place, presently returning, this time accom- 
panied by the younger man, to whom she spoke earnestly in her 
native tongue. As they reached the table he addressed the Just- 
Marrieds in fairly good English. 

"My friend she says she can't speak enough of your language 
to tell you she and me will be married soon, and she asks that 
you do her the honor to drink with her and me — yes?" He 
beckoned the waiter and gave him an order in Hungarian, then, 
turning again to the Just-Marrieds, who sat in a silence of stupe- 
faction : "We will be married in one month an she go right on 
working just the same," he assured them with the conviction of 
one who states an accepted fact. 

As Mrs. Just-Married glanced at the prospective bride, she 
found her offering willing confirmation. "Ya, ya, I go on work- 
in' ; sure, yes !" she declared. 

Luckily the wine arrived at this moment, so the listeners were 
spared a reply. As the health of the happy pair was drunk 
amid suitable felicitations from Mr. Just-Married, he charitably 
refrained from even glancing at his wife. But at the close of 
the ceremony he heard a little gasp at his side as la belle 
Helene, drawing from her bosom a corpulent roll of bills, sum- 
moned the waiter with a lordly gesture. 

"For Heaven's sake, get me out before I burst out laughing," 
Mrs. Just-Married murmured weakly, and, warned by her shak- 
ing voice, her husband obliged. 

The formal farewells were at length ended and the Just-Mar- 
rieds, having been escorted to the door by no less a personage 
than the proprietor himself, faced each other in the street. 

"Don't, don't," his wife pleaded. "It was too awful! Think 
of eating dinner with your cook! And, Jack, do you realize 
that la belle Helene not only paid for the wine we drank, but 
for our dinners as well? How could you let her?" 

"How could I let her? Well, I like that! Why. the waiter 
refused to even touch the money I offered him — said 'the lady' 
had settled it all ! Anyhow, wasn't it our money she was paying 
'em with? We ought to get something out of those two weeks 
you paid in advance, for do you suppose she has the most re- 
mote intention of ever coming back?" 

"No," Mrs. Just-Married admitted. 

It is the ending of this little tale that proves anew that truth 
is, indeed, stranger than fiction. In the wee sma' hours of the 
following morning, Mrs. Just-Married heard sounds that caused 
her to arouse her husband with the shaking whisper: "Jack! 
Burglars! Some one is trying our front door!" 

"That's nonsense," he mumbled in reply. "No, I mean it's 
Guigan's Welsh rabbit; go to sleep again." 

"I hear them — it's burglars," his wife insisted in a tense 
voice. "Listen!" 

For an instant they strained their ears; then the front door 
was cautiously unlatched and closed while heavy footsteps, 
which their owner vainly endeavored to render stealthy, crept 
down the hall, mingled with the husky humming of a Hungarian 
rhapsody. 

For another second or two the Just-Marrieds stared at each 
other in silence ere she muttered in a voice of awe : 

"It's not Welsh rabbit— it's la belle Helene!"— N. Y. Press. 



It is a long cry from the precincts of Holyrood Palace in 

1742 to one of the most recently completed thoroughfares of 
the London County Council. Owing to increased business, the 
proprietors of the famous "White Horse" Whisky are about 
to remove from their present London offices in High Holborn to 
Kingsway House, Kingsway. 



He — You know, my dear, X is an unknown quantity. 

She — I know it is. I've never seen one since I married you. — 
Baltimore American. 



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dish a feast, use 




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John Duncan*s Sons, Agents, New York. 



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Hi A. F. COSGROVE 

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239 POWELL STREET 



THE LATEST STYLES IN 

Choice Woolens 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO., Merchant Tailors 
108-110 Sutler Street French Biok Bide. 



Phone Franklin 6322 Home Phone C 2563 

ELECTRICIANS 

MOTOR EXPERTS 
Wiring Supplies Installations Repairs 

DOUAT & FENTON 



136 EDDY STREET 



San Francisco 



The Italian-Swiss Colony wines, although California's 

choicest product, cost no more than others. For sale every- 
where. 



Murphy Grant & Company 

■Wholesale Dry Goods Furnishing Goods 

Notions 'White Goods Laces 

N. E. corner Buth and Sansome Streeta, San Francisco. 

YOU KNOW 

SAPOLIO 

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CLEANS. SCOURS. POLISHES— Work. Without Wa.te 



!° San Francisco News Letter August 5, 1911. 



Couple Rest With Pleasure 

BY INCLUDING THE 



NEW ORLEANS -NEW YORK 

Steamship Line 



Between New Orleans and New York in the routing of your ticket East. 
Costs less than an all-rail route and affords an interesting and delightful 

diversion on your trip. 



RATES: 

First-class rail to New Orleans and 
First Cabin steamer to New York $ 77.75 

Round Trip 145.50 

One way Rail, one way Steamer be- 
tween New Orleans and New York 70.00 
Second-class Rail and second 
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Rates include meals and berth while on steamer 



WRITE OR ASK ANY AGENT FOR DETAILS 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

TICKET OFFICES: 

Flood Building Palace Hotel 

32 Powell Street 
Market Street Ferry Depot Third and Townsend Streets Depot 

Broadway and 13th Street, Oakland 






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Henry E. Humphrey, as "Ghost," in "Scrooge," at the Or- 
pheum next week. 

The Orpheum. 

By all odds the best show which has been seen at the Or- 
pheum for many weeks is holding the boards this week, and it 
seems that the vaudeville public knows intuitively when such is 
the case, as seats seem to be at a premium. The only blot on 
an otherwise excellent performance is an English importation 
consisting of five people who style themselves "The Dandies." 
Somebody made a gross misrepresentation when they said these 
people have a good act. If such acts can pass muster in Eng- 
land, then their vaudeville standard must be low indeed. One 
of the men is a fair singer, but that about lets them out. They 
are happily first on the program, hence quickly wiped off the 
slate, and thereafter all is high class entertainment. Fay, Two 
Coleys and Fay, are a quartet who do some rather good black- 
face stunts, a melange of singing and dancing interspersed with 
some witty sayings. The act is altogether refreshing, and after 
the fizzle which precedes it, is received with no little enthu- 
siasm. 

William H. Thompson, the distinguished American character 
actor, who has been on the Orpheum circuit for some years, this 
season brings back with him a new act entitled "The Wise 
Rabbi." Mr. Thompson, who does the role of the Rabbi, gives 
one of the most effective character portrayals I have seen in 
many years, and perhaps in this character he does the best work 
I have ever seen him in. The story, which has to do with the 
persecution of the Jews in Russia, is, if anything, a little too 
high class for the average Orpheum audience, but for the per- 
son who can understand and appreciate fine acting, Mr. Thomp- 
son in this patt is a pleasure and a delight. The detail and many 
characteristics with which he invests the role is really remark- 



able. It is a wonderful study, and but confirms the opinion I 
have always held of Mr. Thompson as being our foremost 
American character actor. Mr. Dietrichstein, the author and 
actor, has written a story which is pathetic and powerful. It 
is a vaudeville gem of the first water. The supporting company 
is unusually good. Horace Wright and Reine Dietrich, who 
follow, are both good singers, the one a splendid tenor and the 
other a high soprano. They mix up grand opera and ballads, 
so everybody gets what they desire. They work conscientiously 
and with plenty of zest and spirit. 

An unusually cleverly designed act is that of Dan Burke 
and his seven girl assistants. Burke is one of the old school of 
dancers, and is not exactly a young man, but he certainly does 
show marvelous agility and terpsichorean ability for one of his 
years. His girls are all clever dancers and sing fairly well, and 
the setting is very pretty. The act is very good, and earns lots 
of applause. M. Nederveld presents his trained simian in an 
exhibition of animal intelligence. The monkey is really clever, 
but I am not over-enthusiastic about such acts, though the av- 
erage theatre-goer seems to enjoy these kind of stunds. I can 
always see the cruel jerking the poor animal receives whenever 
it is desired that it shall do one of the tricks which constitute 
the act. 

Leipzig, who dubs himself "The Royal Conjuror," is easily 
the cleverest card manipulator who has ever appeared in this 
city. The big things in this line which the old Herman did are 
nothing to the almost inexplicable tricks which this clever chap 
does for you, and which simply cannot be fathomed. He has an 
easy style about him, which makes his work look so easy. As 
stated, his work in this particular line has never been excelled 
in this city. The big head-line act of the week follows. It is 
a pantomimic affair entitled "The Darling of Paris," and pre- 
sents a fair-sized company, headed by Mile. Mina Minar. The 
latter, on the evening I attended, had a case of ptomaine poison- 
ing, and was not able to do her Apache dance. She managed to 
get through the regular part of the story without difficulty. The 
musical accompanimen f is strikingly effective, and in keeping. 
Pantomime is something of which the foreign schools of dra- 
matic art know a great deal more than in this country. It is a 
wonderful asset for any actor, and we can learn much from 
these exhibitions, which are always vastly entertaining. The 
setting used for this act is magnificent, the finest seen at the 
Orpheum for some time. Do not miss the bill this week. 



ARTS AND CRAFTS 
HOMES 

I have built in Lake street, overlooking the Presidio, op- 
posite Seventeenth avenue, two homes that I desire to 
sell. They arc an arts and craftsman's ideal. The handi- 
craft in them is perfect to the last detail. One is English 
Gothic and the other is largely Dutch and Colonial. 

The houses contain cabinet makers' work, conveniences 
and luxuries that are usually obtained only in very expen- 
sive residences. 

In addition, there is a formal garden in front of each, 
and a superb outlook on the Presidio, Straits and Golden 
Gate. 

The houses must be seen to be appreciated. 

J. J. O'BRIEN, Owner 

On premises daily and Sunday, or may be seen at home 
address, 3735 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 5, 1911. 



"Pierre of the Plains" at the Alcazar. 

Richard Bennett, who is the particular shining light at pres- 
ent at the Alcazar, should have opened in this play in place of 
the melodramatic "Arsene Lupin," which held the boards last 
week, and which afforded the star no opportunity to show his 
true worth. As the half-breed Pierre, the work of Bennett has 
never been excelled at this theatre. When the play was done 
before at the Alcazar, I did not have the chance to v/itness it. I 
had heard good reports from the East of the fine work of Edgar 
Selwyn in the role, who adapted the play for himself from Gil- 
bert Parker's stories, "Pierre and His People." Bennett, by his 
work in this character, establishes himself as a character actor 
of note, his performance at times rising almost to positive great- 
ness. I take it that Bennett is pre-eminently a character actor, 
and I trust that my belief is correct, for herein I can see a big 
future for the gentleman. To all intents and purposes he ap- 
pears to be a free-thinker, so far as his art is concerned, fol- 
lowing no traditions but his own good common sense and judg- 
ment, based on years of experience in his work. He makes the 
half-breed a real human character, with the instinct and feeling 
of the white man, and the traits and characteristics of the In- 
dian. Your sympathy goes out to him, and you are hoping 
that circumstances will develop so as to allow him the happi- 
ness of the girl he loves so unselfishly. This half-breed is a 
man who thinks and philosophises. He knows the pain and the 
joy of living. This is made apparent when in one scene he ut- 
ters the sentiment: "What is life? A little happiness, a little 
pain — to-dav sunshine, to-morrow — nothing." The world has 
buffeted him and treated him harshly, yet his hand is against no 
one except those who outrage the law. He is misunderstood 
and maligned. He is looked upon with loathing and contempt. 
Yet his nature is as gentle as a child's, but when aroused, the 
sleeping and dormant Indian in him asserts itself. It is the abil- 
ity of Bennett to make these characteristics so evident which is 
the distinguishing feature of his almost flawless performance. 
You like the man for his big heart and his kindness and gentle- 
ness to women. You like him because he is not understood by 
the world, and you also like him because from your viewpoint 
as an auditor he is always fighting for the right. 

In my limited gallery of big Alcazar portraits which I treas- 
ure, the Pierre of Bennett will have a conspicuous place. Now 
I am anxious to see more of him, and am anticipating some- 
thing out of the ordinary when next week he is to do the hero 
of Shaw's briiiiant satire. "Arms and the Man." Reports have 
reached me from time to time that in Los Angeles, where Ben- 
nett has played extended engagements, he is a tremendous fav- 
orite, and that in the Southern city he is regarded as an actor of 
brilliant attainments. I was skeptical, and last week I was 
again skeptical, but this week all these doubts have been 
brushed aside, as bv his work in this play alone Bennett raises 
himself to a pinnacle of near-greatness. I am sorry that I can- 
not see him again in the role, and sorry that the play will not 
run a second week. The play has cumulative interest which at 
times borders on the sensational. At times the sentiment may 
be a little tar-fetched, as for instance when the heroine, who 
loves the Sergeant of the Mounted Police, offers to go with 
Pierre wherever he chooses, to show her gratitude for what the 
half-breed has done for her, but Pierre chokes back his half- 
uttered sob of happiness, and realizes that all this is only 
gratitude on the part of the girl, and that she loves another. 
The plea of the girl is theatrical and sounds unnatural, but this 
is but an incident, as the story runs along with splendid coher- 
ence and invariably considerable rationalism and logic and 
reason. 

The climaxes are effective and highly dramatic, and are col- 
ored with the stining life of the Canadian frontier. Mable 
Morrison has the only female role in the play. I like her much 
better this week. She has greater opportunities, and she plays 
the part as if she liked it. Once or twice she struck a false note 
which jarred, but on the whole, her work was consistent and 
very satisfactory. She still has much to learn, particularly as 
to poise and repression, and the value and special significance 
of many of her speeches. Roy Clements, who has been doing 
small parts since his stay at the Alcazar, is given his first real 
opportunity, and as Jap Durkin, he achieves a splendid suc- 
cess. Whether it is his cleverness, or whether it simply hap- 
pened that the role seemed to specially fit him, remains to be 
seen, but as it is, his performance is virile and rings true. His 



sensational fall at his death is a remarkable piece of work. Good 
boy, Clements. 

I really liked Bennison as the rugged father. Every charac- 
ter he touches with his fine understanding of his art he illumin- 
ates. Once in a while he does not exactly strike it, but the con- 
scientious endeavor is there. Roy Neill also had his first real 
chance, and he made good. As the impulsive and hot-headed 
youth who killed a man because he spoke slightingly of his sis- 
ter, he is in the picture at all times, and when you think of the 
many duties ISfeill has as stage manager, you want to allow him 
still more credit. It was fins work. Wesner is not so much in 
the foreground this week, his character being the only comedy 
part in the play, and not a great one at that. Wesner does all 
that could be expected with the role. Sosso was satisfactory 
as Father Coraine, being dignified and natural. Charles Gunn 
as Sergeant Tom Redding, was splendid. He looked manly and 
handsome. Gunn seems to improve steadily, and if he will 
only work for more light and shade in his work, his qualities 
will show to even greater advantage. Walter Belasco, as the 
Indian, with a remarkable make-up, gave one of his great 
"bits." Some day Belasco will have his opportunity at the Al- 
cazar. There are several smaller roles which are all well done. 
The settings are truly fine. The performance on the whole 
strikes a high average. I wish everybody in this city who loves 
good acting could see Bennett and his associates. A trip to 
the Alcazar this week can be considered as a theatrical treat. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

"Arms and the Man," with which Richard Bennett's third 
week at the Alcazar will be opened next Monday evening, was 
written by Bernard Shaw, smasher of popular myths. Merci- 
lessly satirizing militarism and hero-worship, it aptly proves the 
aptness of James Huneker's description of Shaw, "Jester to the 
cosmos and the most serious man on the planet." Included in 
the Alcazar cast are Richard Bennett as Captain Bluntschli, 
Burt Wesner as Paul Petkoff, Louis Bennison as Sergius Sara- 
noff, Charles Gunn as the steward, Mable Morrison as Raina 
Petkoff, Adele Belgarde as her mother, and Viola Leach as the 
serving maid. 

* * * 

The Columbia Theatre will offer next Monday night the most 
important premiere that has been scheduled in San Francisco 
for five years. Henry Miller, who ends a really phenomenally 
successful engagement in "The Havoc" this week, will remain 
in San Francisco next week to present for the first time on any 



Columbia Theatre 

Gottlob, Marx & Co., Managers. 



Corner Geary and Mason Sts. 
Phones Franklin 150. 
Home C 5783. 



ginning Monday night, August 7th. Six nights, roatii a Wedm 

day and Saturday. HENRI .Ml LLER will present for the Brsl time 
the new play, 

THE END OF THE BRIDGE, 
By Florence Lincoln, 
Sunday night, August ISth— THE GIRL IN THE TAXI. 

Nevi Omheum, o-futm sueet. 

J.VVIA/ \yi yiliXJlAjlllj Bet. Stockton and Powell. 
Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre in America. 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

THE STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE. 
AMELIA STONE and AHMAND kai.isz. presenting the operetta. 
"Mon Amour;" "SCTIOOGE." Tom Terries' Adaptation of Charles 
Dickens' "A Christmas Carol;" ORIGINAL FOUH LONDONS; LOU 

ANGER; :.\< E WRIGHT and RENE DIETRICH; THE UAN- 

DIES; M. NEDERVELD'S SIMIAN JOCKEY; NEW DAYLIGHT 
MOTION PICTURES. Last week, "THE DARLING OF PARIS," 
Featuring Mile. Mina Minar. 

Bvening prices, 10c :'5c, 50c. 7Se. Box seals, si. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays), 10e., 26c, 50e. Phones Douglas 7°<: 
Home C 1570. 



Alcazar Theatre 



Sutter and Stelner Streets. 
Phones— West 1400. Home S. 4242. 



Y\v.--k fomm.'neinq Mnn<i:r .-\ ■ niiiLc, August 7th, the eminent Ameri- 
can actor. RICHARD BEWKTT, aided by Mable Morrison ami Hi. 
Alcazar players, In 

ARMS AND THE MAN. 

George Bernard Shaw's delicious comedy-satire on mtlltarl 

Prices — Night, 25c. to $1: matinee. 25c. to 50c. Matinee Saturday 

and Sunday. 

Seats on sale at box-office and Emporium. 



TRINITY SCHOOL 

Accredited to the Universities 

Studies will be resumed August 1, 1911 
848 Stanyan St.. San Francisco LEON H. ROGER. B. S.. Principal 






August 5, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



stage a new play entitled "The End of the Bridge." Althou; : 

the play is to be given only in San Francisco this year, and will 

then be stored in New York until the beginning of next season, 

the actor-manager, as he has always done in this city, will give 

his new dramatic offering a superb production, and has engaged 

a special cast of players in New York to appear here for the 

eight performances of the play. 

* * * 

The Orpheum bill for next week will have as its headline at- 
traction Amelia Stone and Armand Kalisz in a little operetta 
called "Mon Amour." 

A special feature of the new programme will be "Scrooge," 
as played with success in Great Britain for the last five years. 
Mr. Willis Clark, who plays "Scrooge," was a member of the 
late Sir Henry Irving's renowned company. Miss Maude Les- 
lie, who plays Mrs. Cratchit, supported Sir Beerbohm Tree in 
several big productions. 

The Original Four Londons, champions of the air, will be 
seen in their daring and finished casting act. They are the 
only artists in their line who succeed in performing the loop 
the loop somersault from one caster to another. This is only 
one of the feats in an exhibition that abounds in sensational 
and thrilling incidents. 

Lou Anger, the German soldier, will deliver his famous mono- 
logue about the trials and tribulations of those who engage in 
battle. Much new material has been introduced into it, and 
great enjoyment can safely be anticipated. 

Next week will be the last of Horace Wright and Rene Die- 
trich; the Dandies and M. Nederveld's Simian Jockey. It will 
also conclude the engagement of "The Darling of Paris." 



AN UNWARRANTED ATTACK. 

Governor Johnson is at the front again, and is apparently en- 
deavoring to advertise himself. This time the State Board of 
Examiners, who are at the Governor's beck and call, are mak- 
ing unnecessary trouble for the paper and ink houses of San 
Francisco who are supplying the State Printing Office. The 
firms of Zellerbach & Sons, Geo. D. Graham and H. S. Crocker 
are reputable business concerns, and are altogether too highly 
connected to allow themselves to be involved in any such trans- 
action as is being charged against them. The charge that Super- 
intendent Shannon purchased ink for four years ahead proves 
now to be untrue. The order of the State Board of Control, 
directing W. W. Shannon, State Printer, not to use any of the 
paper or inks covered by claims investigated at the instance of 
Governor Johnson, was met on Wednesday by a declaration 
from Shannon that he had just enough of the old stock of ink 
left to run the State printing presses for three or four days. 

The Zellerbach Paper Company have had contracts for State 
Text Book paper on competitive bids for some years. It has 
never furnished any paper except after the award by the State 
Board of Examiners and the written order of the State Printer. 
Some years it has furnished more and some years less than the 
amount that the State Printer has certified to the Board of Ex- 
aminers as the "probable" amount that would be required. 

The award always provided that they should furnish the 
same in quantities "more or less as ordered" by the Superin- 
tendent of State Printing. In the year 1906-7 the amount fur- 
nished was less than the award. In the year 1907-8 the amount 
furnished was twice the amount of the award. In the year 
1908-9 the amount furnished was 100 tons in excess of the 
award. In the year 1910 the amount furnished was less than 
the award. In the year 1910-11 the amount furnished was in 
excess of the award. 

The same rules have existed with the ink houses, and if the 
State Printer found it necessary to carry a certain amount of 
paper or ink in stock, there is no reason why he should not or- 
der it, and absolutely no reason why Zellerbach & Son and 
Geo. D. Graham should not have the privilege of bidding for 
and furnishing the same. 

Business concerns of San Francisco have had enough trouble 
since the year 1906, and have experienced the result of "out- 
side knocking" from business rivals without having to endure 
an attack from State politicians who evidently are already in 
the field working up C3ses here and there that will inure to 
their benefit when the votes are counted at the next State elec- 
tion. The San Francisco News Letter has had large business 
transactions with these firms for upward of a quarter o: 
tury, and feels positively certain that the charges are ur. 



PUBLIC 
^WARNING- 



IN-AS-MUCH as the public 
is frequently defrauded by 
unprincipled dealers, and 
gulled by lying advertisements 
into exchanging GOOD 
MONEY for BAD PIANOS 
under the impression that they 
are purchasing the famous 
"FISCHER" Pianos: 

BE IT KNOWN UNTO ALL 

U The name of the makers of this celebrated piano 
is spelt "F I S C_H E R" and not "FISHER." 

If On all GENUINE "FISCHER" Pianos the name 
is CAST into the METAL FRAME of each piano. 

If The SOLE agents authorized by "J. & C. 
FISCHER" (the builders of the "FISCHER" Piano) 
to sell their pianos, are : 



JIB & CI 

PIANOS 
AND PLAYER -PIANOS 

26 O'FARRELL STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

And at 412 TWELFTH ST., OAKLAND 
ALo at PORTLAND. SEATTLE and SPOKANE 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 5, 1911. 





0&ETX 



The recent revelations concerning the practices of so-called 
beauty specialists show that society least of all is victimized 
by the unlicensed dermatologists. From an authoritative source 
I have learned that the lists of patients of these pseudo-spec- 
ialists were carefully scanned by the detectives searching for 
Miss Ilg, and one searcher was impressed by the fact that not 
a single accredited society name was on any of the lists. 

We are constantly informed via the Sunday supplements that 
society women in search of the peach bloom are skinned and 
baked and frozen and paraffined, but never before in San Fran- 
cisco have we realized how these "beauty pages" play havoc 
with women, and play right back into the hands of the "beauty 
specialists." Girls read of the processes by which famous 
society and professional women improve on nature and combat 
the ravages of Time, and they evidently accept most of this 
fiction as the truth, and wistfully envy the glorious, opportuni- 
ties of the wealthy. Here is made-to-order material for a beauty 
parlor, for sooner or later some of these deluded readers will 
wander that way just to see how much it really does cost, and 
the consequences in one recent case were too heavy to bear, and 
it cost a lovely young life. 

As a matter of fact, society women of this generation know 
that beauty is not skin deep. Of course, they all fluff their 
faces with powder, and most of them make a few passes with 
the pink rabbit's foot just tor luck; and some of them put a 
few golden highlights on brown hair, or discipline gray hair, 
but they none of them are as gullible as the uninformed might 
believe. The society woman has wealth, as a rule, or at least 
a competency, and among other things, that brings expert medi- 
cal advice for herself and her children. She worships beauty, 
perhaps, but she knows that it cannot be acquired by lotions 
applied to the skin, and dangerous tampering with externals. 
The diet, bath, breathing, exercise and general hygiene for 
the child is intelligently supervised, and the mother herself 
counteracts the effects of the social whirl on her system by the 
correctives of a summer spent in healthful outdoor exercise. 

The other Sunday a minister stood up in the pulpit and pro- 
claimed that society women were responsible for this danger- 
ous quest of beauty, which allows so many "beauty parlors" 
to thrive. But if there is one class of women who do not put 
themselves into the hands of quacks, it is the women of the 
smart set. A little investigation on the part of the minister 
would have convinced him that it is usually the working girl, 
befuddled by newspaper accounts of the artificial creation of 
beauty, who is the victim as long as the quack can touch her 
pocket nerve. 

They were discussing this thing at the Burlingame Country 
Ciub the other day. The girls had just come in from the golf 
links, and were refreshing themselves with iced tea. "Why, 
mother was just saying that she doesn't know what this genera- 
lion is coming to," laughed one girl. "She says that we don't 
hold a complexion sacred any more, and she fusses so about my 
freckles, but I tell her they'll all disappear in town this winter, 
and cold creams and things like that would only make the skin 
a better target tor the sun anyway." 

"Of course," agreed the others, and one girl supplemented 
the verdict with : "Oh, who cares about pink and white com- 
plexions nowadays, anyway? I'd rather put up a good, stiff 
game than a delicate complexion." 

And that's the spirit of the society age. 
3 Si S 

An interesting engagement announcement of the week con- 
firms the rumor that Miss Anna Weller had found Cupid's arrow 
tipped by a brass button, and Lieutenant Earl Shipp, U. S. N., 
is the dashing young officer who has won this charming young 
daughter of California. In this particular case, it is not stretch- 
ing a figure of speech, for Miss Weller does belong to a family 
with roots that spread so deep in the history of California that 
it is impossible to tell where personal history leaves off and 
State history begins. Her grandfather was the late John Weller, 



PALACE HOTEL 

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who was a United States Senator from California in the '60's 
when war rode postilion with the nation. Later he was United 
States Minister to Mexico. Miss Weller's maternal grandmother 
is Mrs. John McMullin, one of the notable grande dames in 
San Francisco, and a dominant personality in the smart set for 
many decades 

Miss Weller's parents, Judge and Mrs. Charles Weller, an- 
nounced the engagement at a dinner party in their Pacific 
avenue home, the other night, and already engagement gifts 
are pouring in, for it is not to be a protracted engagement. Lieu- 
tenant Shipp ha? been appointed an instructor at Annapolis, a 
position much to the liking of the young couple, so the wedding 
will be celebrated early next month. Unfortunately, the groom- 
elect is not in town to share in the pre-marriage festivities and 
preparations, but instead is on duty on his ship at Bremerton, 
with the torpedo flotilla. Miss Weller's cousin, Miss Eliza Mc- 
Mullin, who made her debut at the same time at a handsome re- 
ception given by their grandmother, Mrs. John McMullin, will 
be maid of honor at the wedding. Rumor has it that Miss Mc- 
Mullin, herself, will, before many moons, take a leading role 
in such a ceremony. Most of the engagement rumors that have 
been playing hide-and-seek have been brought to the post. Miss 
Janet Klink, like her most intimate friend, Miss Lolita Burling, 
has confessed to a permanent interest in the navy. Mr. and 
Mrs. George T. Klink have announced that Miss Janet will be- 
come the bride of Lieutenant Robert Irvine, who is an officer 
on the Yorktown, which news only confirms a rumor that has 
long been considered accredited to the Court of Veracity. 
& a © 

But in the case of the Campbell family, Rumor was so busy 
performing cardiac tricks on the Princess David Kawananakoa 
that it permitted her sister, Miss Beatrice, to spell out almost 
the last letter of a romance before the public was taken into the 
confidence of a syllable. Miss Beatrice Campbell spent the 
greater part of last winter with the Princess David, and the 
stunning Hawaiian beauties with Mrs. Malcolm Henry made a 
trio that riveted attention everywhere. Somehow, Miss Beatrice 
was not so scrupulously lorgnetted by the match-makers, and 
as a result, there were not so many unscrupulous predictions 
about her matrimonial intentions. The gossips engaged Prin- 
cess David and Mrs. Henry to this, that and the other eligible, 
and each rumor in turn had its cap thrown over the windmills. 




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August 5, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



Possibly Miss Beatrice escaped because all the time she really 
was engaged to George Beckley, of the Beckley family thai i 
so intimately connected with Hawaiian industry and finance. 

The marriage was solemnized on Monday of this week at St. 
Mary's Cathedral, over three hundred guests witnessing the 
ceremony. The bride was given away by her step-father, Col. 
Parker, and she made a beautiful and unusual picture 
bridal robes. Her dress was a rich combination of lace and 
satin and embroidery, and like all conventional bridal gowns 
was fashioned with a train that gave a regal significance to the 
costume. But instead of a wedding veil, this bride chose to 
wear a huge white picture hat that was a shower of white para- 
dise aigrettes. The bride's sister, Mrs. Robert Shingle, and the 
bridesmaids, Miss Mary Osborne, of Fresno, and Miss Mariana 
Pond, of Berkeley, likewise wore large be-plumed hats, and lent 
a pretty touch of color to the picture with pink and blue gowns. 
The young couple plan to spend most of their time right here in 
San Francisco, where they both have many friends, the bride 
having gone to a fashionable school across the bay and the 
groom to Stanford. 

(6 © <B 

A number of San Franciscans are planning trips to Honolulu, 
the first contingent to leave including the Henry Foster Dut- 
tons and their guest, Mrs. Worthington Ames. Before her mar- 
riage, Mrs. Ames visited in the islands en route to the Orient, 
and she has always expressed a desire to return. The Duttons 
have made many jaunts to the Southern Seas, and are enthusias- 
tic about having Mrs. Ames along on this quest of tropical de- 
lights. John Lawson, of Burlingame, gave a picnic dinner in 
the woods near Menlo the evening before the ship set sail, and 
though it was called a picnic dinner, all the approved accessor- 
ies of an indoor entertainment were furnished in addition to the 
delight of a wooded dining room. The souvenirs created a great 
deal of mirth and were significant of possible adventures on sea 
and land. All of the dinner guests and many more friends were 
down at the steamer to speed happily this merry trio on their 
way, which will not lead into this harbor again for two months. 
© ffi © 

Miss C. J. Flood, with her brother's children, Miss Mary 
Emma Flood and Master James Flood, are spending a few 
weeks at Del Monte, giing by the way of Santa Barbara. 

Mrs. A. J. P. Payson, of San Mateo, went down in her motor 
car to Del Monte for the week end. Miss Phelan and her 
friends, Miss Dillon, of San Francisco, and Miss Sullivan. o{ 
Paris, also spent a delightful two days at Del Monte. 
© © © 

Captain A. Burmingham and wife are spending a few weeks 
at Paraiso Hot Springs. 



"A good turkev dinner and mince pie," said a well- 
known aiter-dinner orator, "always put us in a lethargic mood 
— makes us feel, in fact, like the natives of Nola Chucky. In 
Nola Chucky one day I said to a man: 'What is the principal 
occupation of this town?' 'Wall, boss," the man answered, 
yawning, 'in winter they mostly sets on the east side of the 
house and toilers the sun around to the west, and in summer 
they sets on the west side and follows the shade around to the 
east.' " — Washington Shir. 



She — I'm afraid. Tom, dear, you will find me a mine of 

faults. He — Darling, it shall be the sweetest labor of my life 
to correct them. She (flaring up) — Indeed, you shan't. — Bos- 
ton Transcript. 



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SOCIAL-PERSOML ITEMS 




Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear In the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 
KLIXK-IRYINE. — Mr. and Mrs. George T. Klink have announced the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Janet, to Lieutenant Robert L. Irvine, 
U. S. N. 

Island, announce the engagement of their daughter, Adelaide Chris- 
Island, announces the engagement of their daughter. Adelaide Chris- 
tine, to Charles A. Court Beadon of Devonshire. England. 

WEDDINGS. 

OAMrnELL-BECICLEY.— The wedding of Miss Beatrice Campbell, sis- 
ter of Princess David Kawananakoa, and George Beckley. of Hono- 
lulu, took place Tuesday afternoon, August 1st. at St. Mary's Cathed- 
ral «-n Van Ness avenue. 

CHAPMAN-FOSS. — The wedding of Miss Dorothy Chapman and Benja- 
min S. Foss, of Boston, will take place on August 23d at < 
Cathedral, which will be followed by a wedding breakfast at Century 
iinii. 

CLrFF-JANSS.— Miss Florence Cluff will be married to Dr. Edwin Janss 

on September 14th at the Fairmont 
FAV-CRITTENDEX.— The wedding of Miss Estelle Fay and Lieutenant 

Kirby Barnes Crittenden, (J. S. X., will take place August 80th at tin- 
Fay home, S34 Grove street. 
METER-DRAY. — The marriage of Miss Anita Meyer ami Dr. Franklin 

Dray will tali.- place on August 10th, ;it the- home Of Captain and Mrs. 

H. L. E. Meyer on Pacific avenue. 
OCHELTREE-A VERY. —The wedding of Miss Margaret Ocheltrce and 

Lieutenant Ray Longfellow Avery, U. S. A., took place on Tuesday at 

St John's Church. Berkeley. 

HOUSE PARTIES. 

BEAVER. — Miss Isabel Beaver entertained a week-end house party at the 
Beaver home at Inverness. 

JOHXSOX. — Mr. and Mrs. Jack Johnson have been entertaining at a ser- 
ies of informal house parties in Mill Valley. 

McNEAR. — Mr. and Mrs. Seward MeXear had a large ln>use party of 
young people over the week-end at their place near San Rafael. 

PHELPS. — Mrs. Timothy Guy Phelps has lieen entt-rtainlng Bev< 
at her San Carlos home this week. 

SHARON. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Sharon entertained a group of young 
people over the week-end at their Menlo home, where they have been 
giving a series of house parties. 

LUNCHEONS. 
BELKNAP. — Mrs. Charles ii. Belknap entertained at one of the luncheon 

parti* s of tin- week at her new home in West <_'lay Park. 
DAVENPORT. — Miss Eleanor Davenport gave a luncheon on Wednesday 

at her home on Pacini- avenue in honor of Mrs, Georgi Crothere 

(Elizabeth Mills.) 
FARRISH. — Dr. and Mrs. John B. Farrish, of Denver, entertained about 

a dozen of their friends at a pretty luncheon at the St. Francis re- 
cently. 
HILBORX.— Mrs. Louis A. Hilborn was hostess :tt a lnm lieon reel lltlj 

at Sausalito. 
PECK. — Orrin Feck was host at a delightful luncheon recently at the 

Bohemian Club. 

TEAS. 

BALDWIN. — Mis. Lloyd Baldwin entertained at an Informal tea given 
recently at her home in Lyon street. 

HOLDEX.— Missr s Octavla and Mlllicent Holden were hostesses at a 
pretty tea recently. 

MANX.— Mrs. lioi Kentfleld. p] . suffrage tea given 

recently at her country home. 

MILLER.— Mrs. Harriet Miller 'entertained at a tea on Tuesday afternoon 
in honor of Miss Rebecca Kruttschnitt, who Is visiting at Earlton 
Lodge, Santa Barbara. 

PAYNE. — Mrs. Abney Payne entertained at tea recently at her Presidio 
home in compliment to Miss Lucille Cates, fiancee of Lieutenant 
Francis P. Hardaway, U. S. A. 

WfTHROW. — The Misses Marie and Helen Wlthrow entertained charm- 
ingly at the Palace on Wednesday, having a number of out-of-town 
friends at tea. 

DINNERS. 

DOE. — Mrs. Eleanor Doe entertained at a handsome dinner Monday even- 
ing at her cottage nt Santa Barbara. 

STEVENSON. — Lieutenant and Mrs. H. W. Stevenson gave a dinner at 
their attractive quarters at the Presidio recently. 

THEATRE PARTIES. 

BTjAIR. — Mrs. Samuel Blair entertained at a theatre party recently in 
honor of Mr. and Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran, who leave soon for Paris 
to spend the winter. 

RECEPTIONS. 

WITHROW. — Miss Marie Wilhrow was hostess at an interesting recep- 
tion recently at her studio on Pine street In honor of Bernard Wilson. 



CARDS. 

WESTERFELD.— Mrs. H. William Westerfeld entertained at a large 
bridge party at her California street home Tuesday. 

DANCES. 

McLAUGHLIN, — Major and Mrs. McLaughlin gave a dance recently at 
Fort McDowell, for which they invited sixty guests, including several 
from the Presidio. 

MOTORING. 

BF/AYER. — Mr. and Mrs. Fred Beaver, Miss Isabel and Miss Miriam 

Beaver and Miss Dora Winn left Thursday on a motor trip to Lake 

Tahoe, where they will spend two weeks. 
BOM LES. — Mr. and Mrs. Philip Bowles have been touring Lake County in 

their automobile. 
POLLIS. — Mr. and Mrs. James Foilis motored to Santa Cruz recently with 

Miss Ethel Tompkins as their guest. 
GRAY. — Captain and Mr-?. Harry Nathaniel Gray have been making an 

auto trip through the northern part of the State. 
HAMILTON.— Mr. and Mrs. William B. Hamilton have returned from a 

m r lour of Southern California 

LEAVITT. — Rev. Bradford Leavltt and family have returned from Cata- 

Una Island and an automobile trip through the Southern part of the 

Sta t< 

TAYLOR.— Mr. ami Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor have returned from a 
motor tour of Lake County, and will leave shortly for Lake Tahoe. 

BODGERS.— Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rodgers and Mrs. M. L. Nokes are enjoy- 
ing a motor tour of Southern California. 

WARREN.— Dr. H. C. Warren has returned from a motor trip through 
Hi- southern part of the State. 

ARRIVALS. 

ALLEX.— Mrs. I ». H. Allen, Miss Edith Allen and Harry F. Allen have re- 
turned to town after ft trip of three weeks In the Yosemite. 

BLAIR.— Mis.^ Jennie Blair has returned from a trip through Lake 
County. 

BLAND.— Mr. and Mrs. John R. Bland, of Baltimore, are visiting in San 
Francisco and are at the St. Fran< is. 

BRESSE. — Mrs. Eugene Bresse and her daughter, Miss Metha McMahon, 
have returned after an absence of a year or more in Europe, and are 
r< cefvlng a cordial greeting from their friends. 

BREWER. — Rev. an-J Mis. William A. Brewer and. their sons. Whei i 

and William, are at their Hillsborough home again, after spending 
BeveraJ months at Santa Barbara. 

BUCK. — Judge and Mrs. <;< orge If. Buck have returned from their vaca- 
tion at Bartlett Springs, and are at their Redwood City home. 

CAJLLEAU. — Mme. Armand Callleau has returned from a visit to Port- 
land. 

CASTLE. — Mrs. F. L. Castle and Arthur Castle have returned from Eu- 
rope, and are residing at the Keystone Apartments. 

'*i nr-i;BROUGH.— Miss Edith Chesebrough has returned from a trip 
through Northern California as th< j guest of Mr. and Mrs. Victor 
Marowitz. 

CUNNINGHAM. — Mr. and Mrs. George Lortng Cunningham have returned 
from their ranch at Saratoga. 

DRYBEN. — Mr, and Mrs, George H. s. Dryden and their son, Joseph B. 
Dryden, have returned from a trip through Lake County. 

DOSCM. — Arno Dosch has arrived to visit Mrs. DOSCh, who has been at 
the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Sperry, near Alta. Mr. 
and Mrs. Doseh will go East In September. 

i'i.i m »d. — James L. Flood has returned to his residence in Menlo Park, 
from Paso Robles, much Improved in health. 



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j"i""-»^-" 



GRANT AVENUE AT POST STREET 



August 5, 1911. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



FRY. Mrs. Douglas Pry has returned to the ho 

and Mrs. Walter MacGavln, after ;i pleasant visit in Ro 
UELLMAN.— Miss Amy Hell man of Los Angeles ta visiting ■ 

Mrs. S. Ehrman and Mrs. E, s. Heller In Menlo Park. 
HUNTER.— Mr. and Mrs, B. R. Hunter, of New York, who i 

e West, are guests at the Palace 
JOitTJlFETE. — Miss Virginia Jolliffe has returned from Santa 

where she wont lust month with Mrs. Worthlngrton Ames, 
KEENEY.— Miss innvs ECeeney has returned from a delightful vis 

Mies Ysubel Chase at 'Stag's Leap," the country home of Mr. and 

Mrs. Horace Blanchard Chase. 
LAWSON, — John Lawson, who went to London to witness the ooron n. 

has returned to his home in Burlingame after an absence ol threi 

months. 
MARTKL. — Miss Adele Martel has returned to town after a visit with Mr. 

and Mrs. Clarence Martin Mann at their home in Ross, 
MASTEN. — Mrs. Joseph M. Masten and her two daughters are bach in 

town, after summering- at Del Monte for many weeks, 
McCABE. — Mrs. M. J. McCabe, who has been visiting friends at Santa Bar- 
bara, has returned to her home on Pacific avenue. 
McCORMICK. — Mrs. E. O. McCormlck and Miss Louise MeCormiek have 

returned from Paso Robles. where they have spent several weeks. 
McNEAR. — Mrs. George McNear and Miss Elizabeth McNear Iiave returned 

from the Orient. 
MERRILL. — Mr. and Mrs. George A. Merrill have returned to Redwood 

City from their vacation in the mountains neai Soledad, 
NEWHALL. — Mrs. William Mayo Newhall and her daughter, Mrs. Athol 

McBean. are back from Santa Barbara. 
MOKBI/AND. — Rev. Wm. Moreland and Mrs. Moreland Iiave come to San 

Francisco for several months, and have taken the George A. Moore 

house on Broadway. 
NIXON. — Burt Nixon, son of Senator Nixon of Nevada, is a guest at the 

Palace, having come from Reno for the wedding of Miss Beatrice 

Campbell and George Beckley. 
OXNARL). — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Oxnard and Mr. and Mrs. Horace Blan- 
chard Chase have returned from a visit to Castle Crag Farm. 
PETERS. — Miss Anna Peters, who has been visiting relatives in Mon- 
terey, returned to the Fairmont Wednesday. 
PORTER. — Dr. and Mrs. Langley Porter have been visiting relatives in 

Canada, but are again at their residence on Commonwealth avenue. 
SHEA. — Mrs. James Shea and her niece, Miss Kathleen Farrell, have re- 
turned from Del Monte and the southern part of the State, where 

they made a visit of several weeks. 
SCOTT. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Scott have returned from Paso Robles, 

where they have been spending a brief vacation. 
SKI , BRIDGE. — Dr. and Mrs. Grant Selfridge have returned to their i 

in this city, after several weeks' outing at Lake Tahoe. 
SHIELS. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Shiels have returned after ail extended 

visit in the southern part of the State, 
SULLIVAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Sullivan and Miss Gladys Sullivan 

are home again after over a year spent in traveling over Kunin 
TIBBITTS.— Mr. and Mrs. Robert Tlbbltta have returned Crom Europe, 

and expect to spend the rest of the summer taking motor trips over 

the State. 
TOUCHARD. — Miss Alberta Touchard has arrived from the East, and is 

at the Fairmont with Mrs \. N. Burke and Miss Burke 

TURNER. — Mrs. Thomas R. Turner and Harold Turner have retu I to 

their San Mateo home from a trip to Klamath Spiini 
WALKER. — Mr. and Mrs. Clarenoi H. Walker, who havi been pa sing 

their honeymoon in the Hawaiian islands, have returned and are the 

guests of the bride's parents in San Mateo. 
WASHBTJRNE. — Mis. Frederick Washburne ha* returned aftei a visit 

with Mrs. Carlton C. Crane and he* daughter, Miss Helen Crai 

the Hotel Vendome in San JOfiH 

WILSON. — J. C. Wilson has returned from a trip i<> New York, and re- 
joined his family, who are spendln I the CluflE \ \ 
Menlo Park. 

WOOD. Mrs, Seabury Wood. Miss Vclda Wood. Miss Lola u i 
Master Sealed ■>- Wood, havi lusl returned from Tahoe Tavt»i n 
Tahoe. 

EANE.- Miss Bessie Zane has returned from a \isii to SI Helena, where 
she has been the sues! of Mr. and Mrs. de la Toui 

DEPARTURES. 

ANDREWS, M iss Mabel Vndrews leaves to-day t"i Dresden, G 
to meet Dr. Raymond Ru s to ahe will be married on In 

rivaJ 

feoWLES. — Miss Amy Bowles La Sag Harbor, Main., win- re 

sin- will be the guest for the remainder of the summer of Mi 

Mrs. Frank Havens 

BLANCHARD. -Mrs, m. E Blanchard and 

to Paris, after a sojourn In Londo ntertaimil hy 

fi lends. 
CHIPM ax ,- i>i . .in : I Chlpman lefl 

Germany, Miss Etna 

I [i iBl i. "• i i md Mis. H t' C irn, Ji i fnlt d Stal s \ 

tiding tluir honeymoon al Luke Tahoe, but will sail 

for the Philippe 
DEERJNG.— Mr. and Mrs 

week. 

ON Mr. and Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton and Mrs v 
B sailed on Wednesday fbr Honolulu, to be 
weeks. 

kkyvix- Mrs Isaac Erwtn has gow t«> Detroit for a visit with 
before Joining Captain Brwtn at his new station at Fort Leav< 

HAMMOND. -Mrs Richard Hammond and heT 

bom, Sunday for Colorado Springs, where they wl 

i al V, eekS. 

HODKEP 

gon. 



JENNINGS. 

and from Santa Barb , D, C. 

KRTJTTSt IHNITT Mi. and M 

children a re en po Ifexh o. 

PRTNGLE Mi mi. i Mi Bull i home 

at Bu ind have gone to Lake T i 

tfaj lor, i . s \ Naylor ha\ e 

sailed for H lulu where Lieutenant Naylor will < tloned for 

the riexi I ■■ 
POPE Me and Mrs, George Pop< have - to Tahoe Cor a late summer 

■ mi ing;, and w in m i i foi eve: b I da ■■ ■■ 

SCHWERIN. — Mr. and Mrs, Reml P 

bara, where they will make a visit, of a fortntghl or more. 
SPRECKELS.— Mrs. John D, Spreckels, Jr., md Mi Sand P rman In 

tend sailing for the i irlenl on tho LSth, 
STERN.— Mrs. Sigmund Stern has lefl Menlo Park, and gone to Tahoe 

for a few weeks. 
WATERMAN. — Douglas Wat. rman, fiance of .\iiss Mary Page Dutton, 

has left for Panama. 
WHITE. — Mr. and Mrs. Launce White will leave shortlj for Europe. They 

will visit Mr. While's relatives in Kent, England. 
WINSLOW. — Miss Ruth Winslow left recently u>v Santa Barbara, where 
i she will remain until September, 

INTIMATIONS. 
ALEXANDER. — Miss Harriett Alexander returned several days ago from 

a visit to her aunt, Mrs. Mountford Wilson, fti Burlingame, 
BLACK. — Mr. and Mrs. H. Spencer Black have opened their country home 

at Lake Tahoe. 
BOURN. — Miss Ida Bourn, who is spending the summer at the Bourn 

ranch, near St. Helena, spent several days of last week In town. 
BRADLEY. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Bradley of this city are visiting 

in Alaska, and will remain several weeks. 
BROOKS. — Colonel ana Mrs. J. C. W. Brooks are entertaining Mrs, 1.1 

Fontaine of Maine at then home at the Presidio 
CAROLAN. — Mr. and Mrs. M. Francis Carolan, who have been abroad for 

more than a year, Will return in the early fall. 
COLLIER. — Miss Sara Collier will be the guest of Mrs, E, J. McCutchen, 

at Lake Tahoe this month. 
COOPER. — Judge and Mrs. J. A. Cooper, with theh daughter, Miss Ethel 

Cooper, have been making a brief stay on thi McCl 1, where thej 

have been entertained by their friends. 
CROCKER.— Mr. and Mrs. William II. Crocker and the Misses Ethel I 

Helen Crocker are in New York en route to this city, 
CROCKETT. — Mrs. Joseph B. Crock tl ha: been ent< rtaining -Mrs. Russell 

Wilson at her Burlingame inane. 
DARGIE.— Mrs. William B. Dargle is in Honolulu for a visit with friends 

there 
DE PUB. — Miss Elva de Pue, Miss Dorothy Van Sicklen and Miss Frances 

Martin are guests at the home of Miss Agnes Tillman at Aptos, 
DE SABLA. — Mr. and Mrs. Eugene de Sabla, with Miss Vera and Miss 

Leontine de Sabla, have left London and are spending several weeks 

at Carlsbad. 
DREXEL.— Joseph Drexel, oi Philadelphia, who is & guest at the St, 

Francis, la being entertained bj friends al Burlingame. 
EYRE. — Miss Mary Eyre, who returned i the Orlenl with Mr. and Vtrs 

Charles Baldwin, has i n entertaining everal friends this week, 

among them being Miss bMith Chesebrough. 
FLOOD.- Mis panted bj her niece, Miss Mary Emma 

Flood,